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The Canadian Arctic, sociocultural change

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2661
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):484-491
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
so much increasingly de- pends. Department of Local Government Department of Public Works Department of Welfare and Social Services Department of Justice Department of Lands and Forests This recommendation was strongly en- dorsed by the Legislative Council in its aug- mented form, during
  1 document  
Author
Williamson, R.G
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):484-491
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Community health workers
Demography
Health services
Native self-determination
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 120.
Documents

67-09-The Canadian Arctic, Sociocultural Change.pdf

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The Barrow Studies: An Alaskan's perspective

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2682
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 1989; 2(3):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
differentiation of the scientific merits of his research from the political naivete of his group as well as the political, social, and ethical uproar that ensued as a result of this naivete when the data was released. I certainly would agree that the baseline data that Fou Iks gathered was valid as a core sample
  1 document  
Author
Wolf, AS
Author Affiliation
Langdon Clinic (Anchorage)
Source
American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 1989; 2(3):35-40
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
435007
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acculturation
Barrow
Methodology
Michigan Alcohol Screening Test
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Social Change
Social Problems - statistics & numerical data
Social Values
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2360.
Documents

ab8f81c0e2bd90e2f012c6632f6d885d5dd0.pdf

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Maintaining public health into the 21st century: the impact of poverty, privatization, and politics

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2833
Source
Pages 19-22 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, United States, l 994. are all based on income. Data on wealth distri- bution show an even more alarming increase in the gap between rich and poor. Recent data re- leased by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, adjusted for infla- tion, demonstrated that the richest 10% of
  1 document  
Author
Sidel, V.W.
Author Affiliation
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY
Source
Pages 19-22 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Child health
Poverty
Public Health
Public Policy
Documents
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Ethical issues in community health research: implications for First Nations and circumpolar indigenous peoples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2836
Source
Pages 33-37 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
community. 7 Discussion at the lnuvik meeting centered on the problem of mov- ing between the individual and community lev- els in applying basic ethical constructs such as autonomy, beneficence, and justice. Autonomy is a fundamental concept in the ethical analysis of research at both the individual
  1 document  
Author
Kaufert, J.M.
Kaufert, P.L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences and Northern Health Reserch Unit, University of Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 33-37 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Ethics
First Nations
Indigenous peoples
Informed consent
Research relationships
Abstract
Current changes in research relationships include a re-examination of the ethical contracts made between researchers, individuals, and Aboriginal communities. New guidelines for research have been written by First Nations and circumpolar indigenous peoples' organizations. This paper discusses these guidelines, using case examples to illustrate the ethical, methodological, and political problems in the conduct of community-based health research.
Documents
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Organizational justice and disability pension from all-causes, depression and musculoskeletal diseases: A Finnish cohort study of public sector employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286340
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2016 Sep 01;42(5):395-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2016
Author
Anne Juvani
Tuula Oksanen
Marianna Virtanen
Marko Elovainio
Paula Salo
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2016 Sep 01;42(5):395-404
Date
Sep-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - etiology - psychology
Disabled Persons
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology - psychology
Pensions
Public Sector
Registries
Risk factors
Social Justice
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Work-related stress has been linked to increased risk of disability pensioning, but the association between perceived justice of managerial behavior and decision-making processes at the workplace (ie, organizational justice) and risk of disability pensioning remains unknown. We examined the associations of organizational justice and its relational and procedural components with all-cause and diagnosis-specific disability pensions with repeated measures of justice.
Data from 24 895 employees responding to repeated surveys on organizational justice in 2000-2002 and 2004 were linked to the records of a national register for disability pensions from 2005-2011. Associations of long-term organizational justice (average score from two surveys) with disability pensions were studied with Cox proportional hazard regression adjusted for demographics, socioeconomic status, baseline health and health risk behavior, stratified by sex.
During a mean follow-up of 6.4 years, 1658 (7%) employees were granted disability pension (282 due to depression; 816 due to musculoskeletal diseases). Higher organizational justice was associated with a lower risk of disability pensioning [hazard ratio (HR) per one-unit increase in 5-point justice scale 0.87 (95% CI 0.81-0.94)]. For disability pension due to depression and musculoskeletal diseases, the corresponding HR were 0.77 (95% CI 0.65-0.91) and 0.87 (95% CI 0.79-0.97), respectively. Adjustment for job strain and effort-reward imbalance attenuated the HR by 20-80%.
Supervisors` fair treatment of employees and fair decision-making in the organizations are associated with a decreased risk of disability pensioning from all-causes, depression and musculoskeletal diseases. These associations may be attributable to a wider range of favorable work characteristics.
PubMed ID
27501162 View in PubMed
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Systematic review of health disparities for cardiovascular diseases and associated factors among American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259384
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e80973
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rebecca Newlin Hutchinson
Sonya Shin
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e80973
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Social Justice
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations experience significant health disparities compared to non-Hispanic white populations. Cardiovascular disease and related risk factors are increasingly recognized as growing indicators of global health disparities. However, comparative reports on disparities among this constellation of diseases for AI/AN populations have not been systematically reviewed.
We performed a literature review on the prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; and associated morbidity and mortality among AI/AN.
A total of 203 articles were reviewed, of which 31 met study criteria for inclusion. Searches were performed on PUBMED, MEDLINE, the CDC MMWR, and the Indian Health Services.
Published literature that were published within the last fifteen years and provided direct comparisons between AI/AN to non-AI/AN populations were included.
We abstracted data on study design, data source, AI/AN population, comparison group, and. outcome measures. A descriptive synthesis of primary findings is included.
Rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome are clearly higher for AI/AN populations. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia differences are more equivocal. Our analysis also revealed that there are likely regional and gender differences in the degree of disparities observed.
Studies using BRFSS telephone surveys administered in English may underestimate disparities. Many AI/AN do not have telephones and/or speak English. Regional variability makes national surveys difficult to interpret. Finally, studies using self-reported data may not be accurate.
Profound health disparities in cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors for AI/AN populations persist, perhaps due to low socioeconomic status and access to quality healthcare. Successful programs will address social determinants and increase healthcare access. Community-based outreach to bring health services to the most vulnerable may also be very helpful in this effort.
N/A.
Notes
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Cites: Ethn Dis. 2008 Autumn;18(4):450-719157249
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Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;14(9):696-70415380801
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Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2008 Sep;22(9):608-1618496555
Cites: Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1131-4118720374
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Cites: Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1197-20111988590
PubMed ID
24454685 View in PubMed
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Indigenous youth participatory action research: re-visioning social justice for social work with indigenous youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105197
Source
Soc Work. 2013 Oct;58(4):314-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Katie Johnston-Goodstar
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA. john1906@umn.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2013 Oct;58(4):314-20
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cultural Diversity
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Social Justice
Social Values
Social Work - methods
United States
Abstract
The NASW Code of Ethics identifies social justice as one of six foundational values of the social work profession. Indigenous communities have long questioned the authenticity of this commitment and rightly so, given the historical activities of social work and social workers. Still, the commitment persists as an inspiration for an imperfect, yet determined, profession. This article presents a theoretical discussion of questions pertinent for social justice in social work practice in Native American communities: Whose definition of social justice should prevail in work with and in Indigenous communities? What can a revisioning of social justice mean to the development of Native communities and for Native youths in particular? What methods or processes of social work are most appropriate for this social justice work? This article presents a case for the practice of youth participatory action research as one method to work for social justice in Native communities.
PubMed ID
24450018 View in PubMed
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Transforming health care in Alaska: 2010 report / 2010-2014 strategic plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289422
Source
Anchorage: Alaska Health Care Commission. 1 v.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
also contracted with the Institute for Social & Economic Research to study potential impacts of the impending changes to Alaska’s health care system and Alaska’s economy. This report documents what the Commission has learned. Our greatest concern is the continuing escalation in health care
  1 document  
Source
Anchorage: Alaska Health Care Commission. 1 v.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
12910611
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Medical care
Health Services Accessibility
Notes
ALASKA RA447.A4A43 2011
Documents

TransformingHealthCareInAlaska2010.pdf

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Sami lifestyle and health : epidemiological studies from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295942
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2012
factors and lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity has been suggested as an explanation (10, 18). Regarding health care services and social security systems, Sami and non- Sami inhabitants of Sweden are treated equally. Looking at problem areas overrepresented among, or specific for
  1 document  
Author
Nilsson, Lena Maria
Source
Umea Universitet, Dean of Medical Faculty. Medical dissertation, New series no 1475. 78 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1806673
Keywords
Sami
Traditional diet
Traditional lifestyle
Cohort
Mortality
Cancer
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
The aim of this PhD thesis was to expand the current knowledge of “traditional Sami” diet and lifestyle, and to test aspects of the Sami diet and lifestyle, specifically dietary pattern, macronutrient distribution and coffee consumption, in population-based epidemiological studies of mortality and incident cardiovascular disease and cancer in a general population...
Notes
ISBN 978-91-7459-359-4
Documents
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Income-related inequality in utilization of health services in Denmark: evidence from Funen County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80564
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(5):462-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Gundgaard Jens
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Health Economics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(5):462-71
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Interviews
Male
Registries
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: To examine income-related inequity in utilization of healthcare services in Denmark. METHODS: A health survey of 2,915 respondents in Funen County interviewed in 2000 and 2001 on health status and socioeconomic and sociodemographic characteristics was merged with various computerized registers including inpatient stays, ambulatory visits, contacts in the primary healthcare sector, and prescription medicine. The index of horizontal inequity was used to estimate the degree of horizontal inequity in utilization of healthcare services across income groups, using the indirect method of standardization to control for age, gender, and self-assessed health as a proxy for need. The standardization method rests on the assumption of equal response behaviour across income groups. RESULTS: The least advantaged with respect to income consume a bigger share of the health services than the most advantaged with the exception of dental treatments where the opposite is true. After standardization for age, gender, and health status there is no significant inequity in use of all healthcare services. However, when it comes to specific healthcare services the least advantaged have a significantly lower share of the medicine consumption and dental treatments than expected. CONCLUSION: The index of horizontal inequity suggests that the Danish healthcare system is in general equitable. In sectors with a high degree of co-payment some horizontal inequity disfavouring the lower income groups appears to be present.
PubMed ID
16990156 View in PubMed
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Studying social policy and resilience to adversity in different welfare states: Britain and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80628
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2006;36(3):425-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jones Chris
Burström Bo
Marttila Anneli
Canvin Krysia
Whitehead Margaret
Author Affiliation
University of Liverpool, England.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2006;36(3):425-42
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment
Family
Female
Great Britain
Health status
Humans
Male
Policy Making
Poverty
Social Justice
Social Welfare
Sweden
Abstract
Is poverty more damaging to health in Britain than in Sweden, and if so, why? Following previous research by the authors that suggested such an effect, a new comparative study is examining whether there are aspects of the social and policy context in Britain that add to and reinforce the health-damaging experience of being poor. Conversely, are there other aspects of living in Sweden that are supportive for people in poverty, which make the experience of poverty less stressful and health-damaging? Stemming from this ongoing study, the aim of this article is to present a framework for understanding the context in which social welfare policies are formed and operate in Britain and Sweden. It then uses the framework to consider the "upstream" influences of ideology, culture, and values on policy development in the two countries and what these developments might mean for the health and well-being of people facing financial adversity in the two societies.
PubMed ID
16981624 View in PubMed
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Climate change and the Inuit: bringing an effective human rights claim to the United Nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295205
Source
Indiana International and Comparative Law Review. 2014; 24(2):515-546.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
inequitable global society, with greatly differing social, environmental and economic levels of development.”37 The High Commissioner further stated: “A human-rights based approach must be taken so that progress is not made at the cost of the most vulnerable and discriminated against members of society
  1 document  
Author
Emhardt, Andrew D.
Source
Indiana International and Comparative Law Review. 2014; 24(2):515-546.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
250720
Keywords
Inuit
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Human Rights
United Nations
Documents
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Seasonal variation of the amino acid, L-tryptophan, in interior Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3329
Source
Pages 386-388 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, a precursor of melatonin. Wirz-Justice and Richter 6 studied seasonal variation in six subjects and found lev- els of free tryptophan highest in the spring and lowest during the fall. Swade and Coppen8 at a northern latitude reported high levels of plasma- free tryptophan in the spring and lower
  1 document  
Author
Levine, M.E.
Duffy, L.K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA.
Source
Pages 386-388 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Amino Acids - blood
Arctic Regions
Chromatography
Humans
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Sex Factors
Tryptophan - blood
Abstract
The seasonal pattern of L-tryptophan was studied in a Fairbanks, Alaska, population that was unadapted to the extreme light variations of the North. Previously, this population was shown to exhibit seasonal behavior effects such as increases in fatigue and sleep duration, as well as endocrine effects such as increases in melatonin levels and phase shifting. Caloric and macronutrient intake have been reported to vary seasonally in humans, thereby potentially influencing the plasma levels of L-tryptophan, which is a precursor of serotonin and melatonin. Plasma levels of L-tryptophan from volunteers, whose average duration of stay in Alaska was eight months, were determined by automated amino acid analysis. Prominent results included finding increased levels in the winter at several different diurnal time points. These findings support hypotheses which relate underlying physiological adaptations to the North to the increased incidence of behavioral disorders such as depression and alcoholism.
PubMed ID
10093312 View in PubMed
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How can PhD research contribute to the global health research agenda?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169729
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susan H Walker
Veronic Ouellette
Valéry Ridde
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON. walkersh@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):145-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Graduate - economics
Ethics, Research
Health Priorities
Humans
International Cooperation
Mentors
Professional Role
Public Health - economics - education
Research Support as Topic - economics
Social Justice
World Health
Abstract
We propose that PhD and post-doctoral researchers are a strong, untapped resource with the potential to make a real contribution to global health research (GHR). However, we raise some ethical, institutional and funding issues which either discourage new researchers from entering the field or diminish their capacity to contribute. We offer a number of recommendations to Canadian academic and non-academic institutions and funders, and aim to generate discussion among them about how to overcome these constraints. We need changes in the way graduate research is organized and funded, to create opportunities to work collaboratively within established low- and middle-income country (LMIC)/Canadian research partnerships. We urge changes in the way institutions fund, recognize, value and support GHR, so established researchers are encouraged to develop long-term LMIC relationships and mentor new Canadian/LMIC researchers. We ask funders to reconsider additional GHR activities for support, including strategic training initiatives and dissemination of research results. We also encourage the development of alternative institutions that can provide training and mentoring opportunities. GHR per se faces many challenges. If we address those that reduce our potential to contribute, we can become real partners in GHR, working towards equitable global health and solutions to priority health issues.
PubMed ID
16620005 View in PubMed
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How to make allocation decisions: a theory and test questions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174630
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(1):32-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(1):32-3
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making, Organizational
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics, Institutional
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health services needs and demand
Hospital Administration - ethics
Hospital Administrators - psychology - standards
Humans
Personnel Loyalty
Resource Allocation - ethics - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
Hospital administrators are regularly faced with having to cut patient services. Such decisions are essentially questions of distributive justice, and administrators may welcome some guidance. We begin with a key idea from the most influential theory of justice of our times, that of John Rawls, and generate from it a series of test questions against which the ethical dimensions of allocation decisions can be judged.
PubMed ID
15913228 View in PubMed
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Crack use as a public health problem in Canada: call for an evaluation of 'safer crack use kits'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174644
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):185-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Emma Haydon
Benedikt Fischer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):185-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Crack Cocaine - administration & dosage - toxicity
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Evidence-Based Medicine
Harm Reduction
Health Behavior
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Lip - injuries - microbiology
Politics
Prevalence
Public Health Practice
Risk-Taking
Smoking - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Oral crack use (smoking) is a relatively neglected public health problem in Canada, in comparison to injection drug use (IDU). There are indications that crack use in Canada may be increasing. Crack smoking involves particular risks and harms, including possible infectious disease transmission, which underline the need for targeted interventions. One pragmatic grassroots intervention that has only recently begun or been discussed in several Canadian cities is the distribution of 'safer crack use kits', which provide hardware for crack smoking devices along with harm reduction information. In addition to the direct benefits of using them, the kits may also bring previously 'hidden' marginalized crack smokers in contact with health and social services. There has been considerable controversy with regards to the distribution of the crack kits, within criminal justice, public health, and the general public; this resistance appears quite similar to that experienced when needle exchange programs (NEPs) were first being established. Systematic evaluation of the crack kits is urgently needed in order to produce definitive evidence of their health and other benefits, and to allow for evidence-based program and policy decisions in the interest of public health.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2005 Nov-Dec;96(6):450, 47416350871
PubMed ID
15913081 View in PubMed
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Justice in the distribution of health care resources. The position of physical therapists in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74353
Source
Phys Ther. 1982 Jan;62(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1982
Author
R B Purtilo
Source
Phys Ther. 1982 Jan;62(1):46-50
Date
Jan-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Health Policy
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Human Rights
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Justice
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This study compared physical therapists from the United States and from Sweden regarding the interpretations of justice they judged as the most appropriate for distribution of health care resources. A two-part questionnaire was used. Results showed that Swedish therapists were more consistent in their responses than United States therapists, and that they favored a "needs-based" approach over a "utilitarian," "contract," or "skeletal" approach. The impact of the responses upon the physical therapists' involvement in the formulation of this type of health policy is discussed.
PubMed ID
7054789 View in PubMed
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Enviro-Health Links - Environmental Justice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288463
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Publications
Other Publications Databases
Social Justice
Environment
Abstract
This National Library of Medicine (NLM) Enviro-Health Links site provides links and descriptions to environmental justice sites.
Online Resources
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Professional challenges of bedside rationing in intensive care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91671
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):715-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halvorsen Kristin
Førde Reidun
Nortvedt Per
Author Affiliation
Akershus University College, Lollestrøm. kristin.groethe@hiak.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):715-28
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesiology - ethics
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Guideline Adherence - ethics - standards
Health Care Rationing - ethics - organization & administration
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intensive Care - ethics - organization & administration
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Rights - ethics
Patient Selection - ethics
Physician's Role
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Justice - ethics
Abstract
As the pressure on available health care resources grows, an increasing moral challenge in intensive care is to secure a fair distribution of nursing care and medical treatment. The aim of this article is to explore how limited resources influence nursing care and medical treatment in intensive care, and to explore whether intensive care unit clinicians use national prioritization criteria in clinical deliberations. The study used a qualitative approach including participant observation and in-depth interviews with intensive care unit physicians and nurses working at the bedside. Scarcity of resources regularly led to suboptimal professional standards of medical treatment and nursing care. The clinicians experienced a rising dilemma in that very ill patients with a low likelihood of survival were given advanced and expensive treatment. The clinicians rarely referred to national priority criteria as a rationale for bedside priorities. Because prioritization was carried out implicitly, and most likely partly without the clinician's conscious awareness, central patient rights such as justice and equality could be at risk.
PubMed ID
18849363 View in PubMed
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The effect of work environment and heavy smoking on the social inequalities in smoking cessation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67308
Source
Public Health. 2003 Nov;117(6):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Karen Albertsen
Harald Hannerz
Vilhelm Borg
Hermann Burr
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Sociology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark. ka@ami.dk
Source
Public Health. 2003 Nov;117(6):383-8
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Social Environment
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - classification - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate social differences with regard to smoking cessation in Denmark. METHODS: Social differences in smoking cessation were estimated from 3606 smokers from the Danish National Work Environment Cohort Study in 1990, 1995 and 2000. The differences were investigated using heavy smoking and four work environment factors as explanatory variables. RESULTS: The odds ratio for cessation was more than twice as high in social class I compared with social class V. When heavy smoking was controlled, this explained 28% of social differences, the work-environment factors alone explained 36% of social differences, and together the factors explained 55% of social differences. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the social differences in smoking cessation could be explained by differences in work-environment exposures and smoking intensity.
PubMed ID
14522152 View in PubMed
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