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796 records – page 1 of 40.

Balancing relevant criteria in allocating scarce life-saving interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97418
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2010 Apr;10(4):56-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Erik Nord
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, 1403, Norway. erik.nord@fhi.no
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2010 Apr;10(4):56-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging
Decision Making - ethics
Great Britain
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Humans
Infant
Life expectancy
Morals
Norway
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Social Justice
Social Values
Young Adult
Notes
RefSource: Am J Bioeth. 2010 Apr;10(4):37-45
PubMed ID
20379926 View in PubMed
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Occupational justice-bridging theory and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97968
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Elizabeth Townsend
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, and Center for Population studies/Ageing and Living Condition Programme, Umeå University, Sweden. ingeborg.nilsson@umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Occupational therapy
Prejudice
Social Justice
Abstract
The evolving theory of occupational justice links the concept to social justice and to concerns for a justice of difference: a justice that recognizes occupational rights to inclusive participation in everyday occupations for all persons in society, regardless of age, ability, gender, social class, or other differences. The purpose of this descriptive paper is to inspire and empower health professionals to build a theoretical bridge to practice with an occupational justice lens. Using illustrations from a study of leisure and the use of everyday technology in the lives of very old people in Northern Sweden, the authors argue that an occupational justice lens may inspire and empower health professionals to engage in critical dialogue on occupational justice; use global thinking about occupation, health, justice, and the environment; and combine population and individualized approaches. The authors propose that taking these initiatives to bridge theory and practice will energize health professionals to enable inclusive participation in everyday occupations in diverse contexts.
PubMed ID
20170412 View in PubMed
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"Look me in the eye": empathy and the transmission of trauma in the refugee determination process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143215
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;47(1):70-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Patricia Foxen
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. cecile.rousseau@mcgill.ca
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;47(1):70-92
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Altruism
Consumer Advocacy
Cooperative Behavior
Empathy
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interview, Psychological
Machiavellianism
Moral Obligations
Narration
Politics
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Quebec
Refugees - psychology
Social Justice
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Abstract
Debates between refugee advocates, institutional actors and the wider public regarding refugee claimants often evoke anger, fear and sadness, as well as more positive emotions such as compassion, suggesting a complex societal emotional response toward refugee stories. This article analyses the emotional interactions surrounding refugee determination hearings, as reflected in the discourse of administrative judges and refugees. Our results show that the concepts of empathy and compassion are often used by judges to confirm the benevolent image that the administrative tribunal wants to project as a representative body of the host country. However, the very unequal power relations of the hearing setting structure the transmission of the refugee stories in a way that often prevents an emotional encounter between decision makers and refugees. Beyond the specific context of the refugee determination process, these results illustrate how prevalent psychological models of empathy and the transmission of trauma implicitly reveal a political dimension that validates representations of the helpless but potentially dangerous Other, representations that often underlie broader north-south power relations.
PubMed ID
20511253 View in PubMed
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Beyond the band-aids: what is "good" international aid?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143828
Source
Can Nurse. 2010 Apr;106(4):40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Barbara Carpio
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2010 Apr;106(4):40
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disasters
Earthquakes
Haiti
Health services needs and demand
Humans
International Cooperation
Relief Work - economics - organization & administration
Social Justice
PubMed ID
20437734 View in PubMed
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Equity in health care utilization: further tests based on hurdle models and Swedish micro data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208529
Source
Health Econ. 1997 May-Jun;6(3):303-19
Publication Type
Article
Author
U G Gerdtham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden. heug@hhs.se
Source
Health Econ. 1997 May-Jun;6(3):303-19
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Databases, Factual
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Models, Statistical
Office Visits - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poisson Distribution
Program Evaluation
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Social Class
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
State Medicine - standards
Sweden
Urban health
Abstract
This paper tests the null hypothesis of no horizontal inequity in delivery of health care by use of count data hurdle models and Swedish micro data. It differs from most earlier work in three principal ways: First, the tests are carried out separately for physician and hospital care; second, the tests are carried out separately for the probability of seeking care and the amount of care received (given any use); and third, the tests are based on a model that includes several socioeconomic variables, e.g. income, education and size of community of residence. The paper rejects the hypothesis of no inequity because socioeconomic factors also have significant effects on utilization, e.g. income and size of community of residence. Size of community of residence has a positive significant effect on the frequency of physician visits but not on the probability of visiting a physician.
PubMed ID
9226147 View in PubMed
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Justice system clients of a Toronto youth addiction treatment program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208632
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1997 May;23(2):335-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997

Comments on Birch and Abelson's "Is reasonable access what we want"?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219314
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1994;24(2):371-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R. Chernomas
Author Affiliation
Faculty Association, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1994;24(2):371-2
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality - trends
National Health Programs - trends
Social Justice
Notes
Comment On: Int J Health Serv. 1993;23(4):629-538080493
PubMed ID
8034398 View in PubMed
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Age differences of married and divorcing couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219457
Source
Health Rep. 1994;6(2):225-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J F Gentleman
E. Park
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1994;6(2):225-40
Date
1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aging
Canada
Divorce - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
This paper analyzes the probability of a married couple getting divorced, based on the age difference between the husband and wife. To calculate such probabilities, the distribution of age differences of married couples was derived from the 1991 Census and the 1990 General Social Survey, and the distribution of age differences of divorcing couples was obtained from 1991 divorce data provided by the Department of Justice Canada. These distributions, the first based on data that are seldom available, are also analyzed in this paper. The results provide details about the expected significant imbalances that exist, both for married and divorcing couples, between the number of couples with older husbands and the number with older wives. A model is developed that shows that divorce rates are lowest when the husband is two to ten years older than the wife or when the magnitude of their age difference is extremely large. Furthermore, the chance of divorce is much higher when the wife is older than the husband than vice versa. The demands on a younger spouse--usually the wife--to provide informal health care for an older spouse are briefly discussed.
PubMed ID
7873718 View in PubMed
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Setting health care priorities in Sweden: the politician's point of view.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219874
Source
Health Policy. 1993 Dec;26(2):141-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
S. Björk
P. Rosén
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund.
Source
Health Policy. 1993 Dec;26(2):141-54
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Ethics
Health Behavior
Health Care Rationing - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Priorities - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Physician's Role
Policy Making
Politics
Social Justice
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In this report, the results of interviews with sixty local health care politicians in southern Sweden will be presented. It is evident from the material that despite their formal responsibility, the politicians are of the opinion that other actors exert greater influence upon the allocation of resources. They do not think that health care expenditure need be extended, whereas fields such as care of the elderly and preventive medicine ought to receive extended contributions at the expense of other publicly financed activities such as general mammography and in vitro fertilization. Somewhat more than a third of the politicians hold that the goal stipulated in the Swedish Health Care Act, i.e. to provide good health and care on equal terms, has not been fulfilled. Their attitudes towards priority criteria such as personal responsibility, age, life expectancy, parenthood and productivity differ from case to case, and there is no clear-cut consensus. However, approximately half of the respondents agree wholly or partly that a person who promises to alter his or her unhealthy habits should be treated before someone who does not make such a promise. The same applies to the principle that those employed ought to be given priority in operating queues, and in consequence of this utility perspective there are also increased demands upon the physicians to take economy into consideration in treating an individual patient.
PubMed ID
10131280 View in PubMed
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Rodriguez v. British Columbia (Attorney-General).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220257
Source
Can Supreme Court Rep Can Supreme Court. 1993 Sep 30;[1993] 3:519-632
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1993

Dimensionality of organizational justice in a call center context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123813
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):677-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Douglas Flint
Lynn M Haley
Jeffrey J McNally
Author Affiliation
University of New Brunswick. dflint@unb.ca
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):677-93
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Data Collection
Employee Grievances
Ethics, Institutional
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Marketing
New Brunswick
Personnel Management
Social Justice
Telephone
Workplace
Abstract
Summary.-Employees in three call centers were surveyed about their perceptions of organizational justice. Four factors were measured: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether a two-, three-, or four-factor model best fit the call center data. A three-factor model of distributive, procedural, and informational justice provided the best fit to these data. The three-factor model that showed the best fit does not conform to any of the more traditional models identified in the organizational justice literature. This implies that the context in which organizational justice is measured may play a role in identifying which justice factors are relevant to employees. Findings add to the empirical evidence on the dimensionality of organizational justice and imply that dimensionality of organizational justice is more context-dependent than previously thought.
PubMed ID
22662419 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties of a four-component Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123814
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):571-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Olav Kjellevold Olsen
Helga Myrseth
Are Eidhamar
Sigurd W Hystad
Author Affiliation
Department of Leadership Development, The Royal Norwegian Naval Academy, Bergen, Norway. olav.olsen@psysp.uib.no
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):571-88
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Data Collection
Ethics, Institutional
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Justice
Translating
Abstract
Organizational justice has attracted attention as a predictor of employees' mental and physical health as well as commitment and work outcomes. The lack of a Norwegian translation of an organizational justice scale has precluded its use in Norway. Four dimensions of the organizational justice construct were examined in a Norwegian military context, including facet measures of distributional, interpersonal, and informational justice developed by Colquitt in 2001, in addition to procedural justice developed by Moorman in 1991. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-dimensional structure with good internal consistency. Follow-up analyses have suggested that the four dimensions were nested beneath a general, latent organizational justice factor. A positive relationship between organizational justice and self-sacrificial behavior was found, indicating satisfactory construct validity. The results demonstrate that the Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale is a reliable and construct-valid measure of organizational justice in a Norwegian setting.
PubMed ID
22662411 View in PubMed
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Integrating care for individuals with FASD: results from a multi-stakeholder symposium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266828
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15(1):457
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Paul Masotti
Sally Longstaffe
Holly Gammon
Jill Isbister
Breann Maxwell
Ana Hanlon-Dearman
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15(1):457
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) has a significant impact on communities and systems such as health, education, justice and social services. FASD is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that results in permanent disabilities and associated service needs that change across affected individuals' lifespans. There is a degree of interdependency among medical and non-medical providers across these systems that do not frequently meet or plan a coordinated continuum of care. Improving overall care integration will increase provider-specific and system capacity, satisfaction, quality of life and outcomes.
We conducted a consensus generating symposium comprised of 60 experts from different stakeholder groups: Allied & Mental Health, Education, First Nations & Métis Health, Advocates, Primary Care, Government Health Policy, Regional FASD Coordinators, Social Services, and Youth Justice. Research questions addressed barriers and solutions to integration across systems and group-specific and system-wide research priorities. Solutions and consensus on prioritized lists were generated by combining the Electronic Meeting System approach with a modified 'Nominal Group Technique'.
FASD capacity (e.g., training, education, awareness) needs to be increased in both medical and non-medical providers. Outcomes and integration will be improved by implementing: multidisciplinary primary care group practice models, FASD system navigators/advocates, and patient centred medical homes. Electronic medical records that are accessible to multiple medical and non-medical providers are a key tool to enhancing integration and quality. Eligibility criteria for services are a main barrier to integration across systems. There is a need for culturally and community-specific approaches for First Nations communities.
There is a need to better integrate care for individuals and families living with FASD. Primary Care is well positioned to play a central and important role in facilitating and supporting increased integration. Research is needed to better address best practices (e.g., interventions, supports and programs) and long-term individual and family outcomes following a diagnosis of FASD.
PubMed ID
26438317 View in PubMed
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Tackling epistemological naivety: large-scale information systems and the complexities of the common good.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132156
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2011 Oct;20(4):584-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011

How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part II: The impact of active and passive labor market policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132184
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):415-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Paula Holland
Lotta Nylén
Karsten Thielen
Kjetil A van der Wel
Wen-Hao Chen
Ben Barr
Bo Burström
Finn Diderichsen
Per Kragh Andersen
Espen Dahl
Sharanjit Uppal
Stephen Clayton
Margaret Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Research, Lancaster University, England.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):415-30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chronic Disease
Disabled Persons
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Europe
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Organizational Policy
Public Policy
Regression Analysis
Social Justice
Social Welfare
Abstract
The authors investigate three hypotheses on the influence of labor market deregulation, decommodification, and investment in active labor market policies on the employment of chronically ill and disabled people. The study explores the interaction between employment, chronic illness, and educational level for men and women in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, countries with advanced social welfare systems and universal health care but with varying types of active and passive labor market policies. People with chronic illness were found to fare better in employment terms in the Nordic countries than in Canada or the United Kingdom. Their employment chances also varied by educational level and country. The employment impact of having both chronic illness and low education was not just additive but synergistic. This amplification was strongest for British men and women, Norwegian men, and Danish women. Hypotheses on the disincentive effects of tighter employment regulation or more generous welfare benefits were not supported. The hypothesis that greater investments in active labor market policies may improve the employment of chronically ill people was partially supported. Attention must be paid to the differential impact of macro-level policies on the labor market participation of chronically ill and disabled people with low education, a group facing multiple barriers to gaining employment.
PubMed ID
21842571 View in PubMed
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Care or control: health or criminal justice options for the long-term seriously mentally ill in a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216417
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1995;18(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J H Hylton
Author Affiliation
Canadian Mental Health Association, Saskatchewan.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1995;18(1):45-59
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Criminal Law
Employment
Health Care Reform
Humans
Income
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Mental Health Services - utilization
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Social Support
PubMed ID
7759188 View in PubMed
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796 records – page 1 of 40.