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Limited information, medical entitlements and distributive justice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239515
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(10):1187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
B W Semkow
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(10):1187-92
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diagnosis
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
Probability
Resource Allocation
Social Justice
Social Welfare
Abstract
This paper asks the question of how much should society spend on diagnosis as opposed to medical treatments and compensation when implementing its goals of distributive justice in health policy through publicly-funded medical entitlement programs in a world of limited information? A model is presented in which social planners seek to maximize expected social welfare by allocating medical goods, including diagnostic tests among medically dissimilar individuals when there is imperfect information about the medical condition of an individual, subject to the resource constraints of a medical entitlement fund. The goals of distributive justice underlying the social welfare function is governed by a parameter representing society's aversion to inequality. It is argued that society, given its aversion to inequality, need not always entitle the medically more fortunate individual to less treatment and compensation. Moreover, in most cases, it is socially desirable to spend a finite and equal amount on diagnostic tests for each individual, even though there is some probability of misdiagnosis. In some unusual cases, zero expenditures on diagnostic tests will be socially optimal.
PubMed ID
3936194 View in PubMed
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Justice foundations for the Comprehensive Law Movement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140393
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Nov-Dec;33(5-6):463-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dale Dewhurst
Author Affiliation
Athabasca University, Athabasca, Alberta, Canada. daled@athabascau.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Nov-Dec;33(5-6):463-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Criminal Law - ethics - trends
Ethics, Professional
Happiness
Humans
Judicial Role
Negotiating
Rehabilitation - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice
United States
Virtues
Abstract
Authors examining the developing dispute resolution alternatives to the adversarial system have identified nine converging "vectors" or alternatives in what has been termed the Comprehensive Law Movement. These authors have sought to understand how the developing vectors can remain separate and vibrant movements while sharing common ground. Some analyze these developments as being within law and legal practice, others see them as alternative approaches to law, and still others take a combined approach. It will be impossible to understand how these vectors have meaningful differences from law and legal practice if the search is limited to looking within law and legal practice. It will be impossible to understand how these vectors have meaningful commonalities with law and legal practice if the search is limited to looking external to law and legal practice. Instead of comparing the vectors with the adversarial system, higher order criteria are required. What is needed is a comprehensive and internally consistent super-system of norms; one that can be used to evaluate the adversarial system and the evolving vectors on an equal footing. An Aristotelian natural law virtue theory of justice can: (a) provide a functional guiding definition of justice; (b) serve as a comprehensive and internally consistent super-system of norms; and (c) provide the theoretical and evaluative foundation required to clarify the relationships among the adversarial system and the developing vectors. Finally, it will become clear why the Comprehensive Law Movement might be more appropriately conceptualized as the Comprehensive Justice Movement.
PubMed ID
20880589 View in PubMed
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Inequities in health and healthcare viewed through the ethical lens of critical social justice: contextual knowledge for the global priorities ahead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147189
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2009 Oct-Dec;32(4):282-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joan M Anderson
Patricia Rodney
Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham
Annette J Browne
Koushambhi Basu Khan
M Judith Lynam
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. joan.anderson@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2009 Oct-Dec;32(4):282-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonialism
Cultural Competency - ethics - organization & administration
Diffusion of Innovation
Feminism
Forecasting
Health Planning - ethics - organization & administration
Health Priorities - ethics - organization & administration
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethics - organization & administration
Healthy People Programs - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Knowledge
Nursing Research - ethics - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
Prejudice
Principle-Based Ethics
Social Justice - ethics
World Health
Abstract
The authors use the backdrop of the Healthy People 2010 initiative to contribute to a discussion encompassing social justice from local to national to global contexts. Drawing on findings from their programs of research, they explore the concept of critical social justice as a powerful ethical lens through which to view inequities in health and in healthcare access. They examine the kind of knowledge needed to move toward the ideal of social justice and point to strategies for engaging in dialogue about knowledge and actions to promote more equitable health and healthcare from local to global levels.
PubMed ID
19934835 View in PubMed
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[The levels of health justice and the distribution of resources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165089
Source
An Sist Sanit Navar. 2006;29 Suppl 3:61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
A. Couceiro
Author Affiliation
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. acouceiro@arrakis.es
Source
An Sist Sanit Navar. 2006;29 Suppl 3:61-74
Date
2006
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services - supply & distribution
Humans
Netherlands
Resource Allocation - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The right to health care is a social achievement of democratic states based on law. In order for this to become effective in a just way, it is necessary for many elements to come together. This article analyses these elements in their different moments: the state as a guarantor of this right and to limit assistance; the health institutions, direct managers of care, which must combine efficiency and equity; and, finally, the health professionals, who are in the final instance the real distributors of resources. Traditionally medicine always omitted evaluation of the socio-economic factors from its sphere. It even came to consider that these questions were opposed to good medical practice. Today such an assertion is unsustainable. For a health professional the path to efficiency passes by way of assuring clinical effectiveness, in this way guaranteeing both the patient's interest and the suitable distribution of resources.
PubMed ID
17308540 View in PubMed
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Allocating scarce resources: a question of distributive justice. Part I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206473
Source
CHAC Rev. 1997;25(3):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
F M Stogre
Author Affiliation
Anishnabe Spiritual Centre, Espanola, Ontario.
Source
CHAC Rev. 1997;25(3):10-3
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Policy
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Preventive Medicine
Social Justice
PubMed ID
10176060 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Mar 5;16(5):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1992
Author
K. Nyman
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Mar 5;16(5):3
Date
Mar-5-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Pensions
Retirement
Social Justice
Sweden
PubMed ID
1636316 View in PubMed
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Dimensionality of organizational justice in a call center context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123813
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):677-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Douglas Flint
Lynn M Haley
Jeffrey J McNally
Author Affiliation
University of New Brunswick. dflint@unb.ca
Source
Psychol Rep. 2012 Apr;110(2):677-93
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Data Collection
Employee Grievances
Ethics, Institutional
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Marketing
New Brunswick
Personnel Management
Social Justice
Telephone
Workplace
Abstract
Summary.-Employees in three call centers were surveyed about their perceptions of organizational justice. Four factors were measured: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether a two-, three-, or four-factor model best fit the call center data. A three-factor model of distributive, procedural, and informational justice provided the best fit to these data. The three-factor model that showed the best fit does not conform to any of the more traditional models identified in the organizational justice literature. This implies that the context in which organizational justice is measured may play a role in identifying which justice factors are relevant to employees. Findings add to the empirical evidence on the dimensionality of organizational justice and imply that dimensionality of organizational justice is more context-dependent than previously thought.
PubMed ID
22662419 View in PubMed
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'We don't want to manage poverty': community groups politicise food insecurity and charitable food donations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167514
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(1):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Melanie Rock
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Department of Community Health Sciences, Health Sciences Centre, Canada. mrock@ucalgary.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2006;13(1):36-41
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Charities
Food Supply
Humans
Poverty
Social Justice
Abstract
Charitable assistance is a common response to food insecurity in many affluent countries. The coalition featured in this case study is explicitly concerned with social justice, mitigating the potential for charitable assistance to mask the extent of food insecurity, its root causes and its long-term consequences. The coalition structure has assisted community workers in transcending day-to-day routines, so as to reflect on the politics of food insecurity and institutionalised responses to this problem. Coalition members have defined food security as an objective whose achievement will entail comprehensive reform. One noteworthy outcome has been to recommend that member groups not redistribute a number of foodstuffs commonly donated by individuals and corporations. In grappling with a tension between responding to immediate needs for food and addressing the root causes of these needs, community workers have paid attention to public health.
PubMed ID
16970003 View in PubMed
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Using the table in the Swedish review on shaken baby syndrome will not help courts deliver justice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295650
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 07; 106(7):1043-1045
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
07-2017
Author
Robert A C Bilo
Sibylle Banaschak
Bernd Herrmann
Wouter A Karst
Bela Kubat
Hubert G T Nijs
Rick R van Rijn
Jan Sperhake
Arne Stray-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Section on Forensic Pediatrics, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2017 07; 106(7):1043-1045
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Child Abuse
Humans
Infant
Shaken Baby Syndrome
Social Justice
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul;106(7):1021-1027 PMID 28130787
CommentIn: Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jul;106(7):1046 PMID 28440883
PubMed ID
28374456 View in PubMed
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How can forensic systems improve justice for victims of offenders found not criminally responsible?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105691
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2013;41(4):568-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jason Quinn
Alexander I F Simpson
Author Affiliation
MB, ChB, BMedSci, Unit 3, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 1001 Queen Street West, Toronto M6J 1H4, ON, Canada. sandy.simpson@camh.ca.
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2013;41(4):568-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crime Victims - psychology
Humans
Insanity Defense
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Controversy has arisen surrounding findings of not criminally responsible (NCR) or not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) in recent years. In some countries, the debate has been driven by the concerns of victims, who are seeking greater information on discharge, accountability on the part of the offender, and involvement in the disposition of NCR or NGRI perpetrators. Their demands raise questions about proportionality between the seriousness of the index offense and the disposition imposed, the place of retribution in the NCR regimen, and the ethics-related challenges that emerge from this tension. We conducted a literature review focused on the relationship of victims to NCR and NGRI processes. The literature is limited. However, theoretical reasoning suggests that interventions based on restorative justice principles reduce persistently negative feelings and increase a sense of justice for victims of criminally responsible defendants. Opportunities and problems with extending such processes into the area of mentally abnormal offenders are discussed.
PubMed ID
24335331 View in PubMed
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Health systems' impact on social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150370
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2009;Suppl 1:88
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rigmor Aasrud
Author Affiliation
Health and Care Services, Norway.
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2009;Suppl 1:88
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Norway
Prejudice
Public Health
Public Health Practice
Social Justice
Social Welfare
World Health
PubMed ID
19477847 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gilles Paradis
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Public Health
Social Justice
PubMed ID
23618632 View in PubMed
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Indigenous peoples of North America: environmental exposures and reproductive justice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121535
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):1645-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Elizabeth Hoover
Katsi Cook
Ron Plain
Kathy Sanchez
Vi Waghiyi
Pamela Miller
Renee Dufault
Caitlin Sislin
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
American Studies Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 , USA. Elizabeth_M_Hoover@brown.edu
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):1645-9
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Reproduction
Social Justice
United States
Abstract
Indigenous American communities face disproportionate health burdens and environmental health risks compared with the average North American population. These health impacts are issues of both environmental and reproductive justice.
In this commentary, we review five indigenous communities in various stages of environmental health research and discuss the intersection of environmental health and reproductive justice issues in these communities as well as the limitations of legal recourse.
The health disparities impacting life expectancy and reproductive capabilities in indigenous communities are due to a combination of social, economic, and environmental factors. The system of federal environmental and Indian law is insufficient to protect indigenous communities from environmental contamination. Many communities are interested in developing appropriate research partnerships in order to discern the full impact of environmental contamination and prevent further damage.
Continued research involving collaborative partnerships among scientific researchers, community members, and health care providers is needed to determine the impacts of this contamination and to develop approaches for remediation and policy interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22899635 View in PubMed
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Accommodating a social work student with a speech impairment: the shared experience of a student and instructor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139086
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kimberly Calderwood
Jonathan Degenhardt
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. kcalder@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Male
Ontario
Social Justice
Social Work - education
Speech
Stuttering - psychology
Teaching
Abstract
This ethnographic study describes the results of a collaborative journaling process that occurred between a student and his instructor of a second-year social work communications course. Many questions from the student's and the instructor's perspectives are raised regarding accommodating the student with a severe speech impairment in a course that specifically focuses on communication skills. Preliminary recommendations are made for social work students and professionals with communication limitations, and for social work educators.
PubMed ID
21104514 View in PubMed
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Health inequalities in Britain and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230359
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 5;2(8658):331
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1989
Author
M. Whitehead
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 5;2(8658):331
Date
Aug-5-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Great Britain
Health Services - supply & distribution
Humans
Social Class
Social Justice
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1989 Jul 1;2(8653):35-62567803
PubMed ID
2569129 View in PubMed
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Newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry: ethical and social issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161110
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):284-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Denise Avard
Hilary Vallance
Cheryl Greenberg
Beth Potter
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche en droit public, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7. denise.avard@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):284-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
National Health Programs
Neonatal Screening - ethics - methods
Social Justice
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Emerging technologies like Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TMS) enable multiple tests on a single blood sample and allow the expansion of Newborn Screening (NBS) to include various metabolic diseases. Introducing TMS for NBS raises important social and ethical questions: what are the criteria for adding disorders to screening panels? What evidence justifies expansion of screening? How can equity in NBS access and standards be ensured? How can policy standards be set, given the multiplicity of stakeholders? To address emerging issues, policy-makers, patient advocates, clinicians and researchers had a workshop during the 2005 Garrod Symposium. The participants received a summary of the discussion and understood the workshop's goal was to provide a basis for further discussion. This article contributes to this ongoing discussion. Several proposed recommendations assert the centrality of including social and ethical issues in the assessment of whether or not to introduce TMS. The article outlines five key recommendations for advancing the NBS agenda: national public health leadership; transparency; increased national consistency in NBS strategy, including minimum standards; collaboration between the federal and provincial/territorial governments and diverse stakeholders; and supporting research and/or programs based on effectiveness, which integrate ethical and social issues into assessment.
PubMed ID
17896737 View in PubMed
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Foreigners and the right to justice in the aftermath of 9/11.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177244
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Nov-Dec;27(6):609-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
François Crépeau
Estibalitz Jimenez
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Studies and Research (CERIUM), University of Montreal, Canada. francois.crepeau@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Nov-Dec;27(6):609-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Civil Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Emigration and Immigration - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Security Measures - legislation & jurisprudence
September 11 Terrorist Attacks - psychology
Social Control, Formal
Social Justice
Time Factors
PubMed ID
15560885 View in PubMed
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[Take sides against injustice. Interview by Siv Barstad.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49153
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Nov 2;81(18):12-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1993
Author
O. Aschjem
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Nov 2;81(18):12-3
Date
Nov-2-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Domestic Violence
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing
Social Justice
PubMed ID
8024885 View in PubMed
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792 records – page 2 of 40.