Skip header and navigation

Refine By

673 records – page 1 of 34.

Harm reduction through a social justice lens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159118
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Feb;19(1):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Bernadette Pauly
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Box 1700, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2, Canada. bpauly@uvic.ca
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Feb;19(1):4-10
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Harm Reduction - ethics
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - ethics
Health status
Homeless Persons
Humans
Poverty
Social Justice
Social Problems - prevention & control
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
People who are street involved such as those experiencing homelessness and drug use face multiple inequities in health and access to health care. Morbidity and mortality are significantly increased among those who are street involved. Incorporation of a harm reduction philosophy in health care has the potential to shift the moral context of health care delivery and enhance access to health care services. However, harm reduction with a primary focus on reducing the harms of drug use fails focus on the harms associated with the context of drug use such as homelessness, violence and poverty.
Ethical analysis of the underlying values of harm reduction and examination of different conceptions of justice are discussed as a basis for action that addresses a broad range of harms associated with drug use.
Theories of distributive justice that focus primarily on the distribution of material goods are limited as theoretical frameworks for addressing the root causes of harm associated with drug use. Social justice, reconceptualised and interpreted through a critical lens as described by Iris Marion Young, is presented as a promising alternative ethical framework.
A critical reinterpretation of social justice leads to insights that can illuminate structural inequities that contribute to the harms associated with the context of drug use. Such an approach provides promise as means of informing policy that aims to reduce a broad range of harms associated with drug use such as homelessness and poverty.
PubMed ID
18226520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mainstreaming social justice: human rights and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176396
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Madine VanderPlaat
Nair Teles
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Criminology, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3. madine.vanderplaat@smu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):34-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Human Rights
Humans
Public Health - ethics
Social Justice
Abstract
Our interest in a human rights and health discourse emerges from our efforts as social scientists to bring a meaningful social justice perspective to the realm of public health. In Canada, as in many countries, "health" is still firmly within the domain of the biomedical and the clinical. While considerable effort has been made to include more social, economic, and cultural perspectives, efforts to frame these issues as political phenomena have tended to be polarized into either a rich body of theoretical literature or case studies of interventions which have in varying degrees incorporated a social justice approach. What is still missing is a framework of discourse that allows various concepts of social justice to inform policy, intervention strategies, evaluation and evidence-based measures of effectiveness. This commentary examines the human rights discourse as conceptual space from which to build this framework.
PubMed ID
15682691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Narratives of social justice: learning in innovative clinical settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169527
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2005;2:Article28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Sheryl Reimer Kirkham
Lynn Van Hofwegen
Catherine Hoe Harwood
Author Affiliation
Trinity Western University. Sheryl.Kirkham@twu.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2005;2:Article28
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Focus Groups
Humans
Learning
Patient Advocacy
Poverty
Social Justice
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
The nursing profession has renewed its commitment to social and political mandates, resulting in increasing attention to issues pertaining to diversity, vulnerable populations, social determinants of health, advocacy and activism, and social justice in nursing curricula. Narratives from a qualitative study examining undergraduate nursing student learning in five innovative clinical settings (corrections, international, parish, rural, and aboriginal) resonate with these curricular emphases. Data were derived from focus groups and interviews with 65 undergraduate nursing students, clinical instructors, and RN mentors. Findings of this study reveal how students in innovative clinical placements bear witness to poverty, inequities, and marginalization (critical awareness), often resulting in dissonance and soul-searching (critical engagement), and a renewed commitment to social transformation (social change). These findings suggest the potential for transformative learning in these settings.
PubMed ID
16646923 View in PubMed
Less detail

Revisiting our social justice roots in population health intervention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145026
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Nov-Dec;100(6):405-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Nov-Dec;100(6):405-8
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Promotion - history
Health Services Research
Healthcare Disparities
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Public Health
Social Justice - history
PubMed ID
20209730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social justice and core competencies for public health: improving the fit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157381
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Colleen MacLean Davison
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. nedwards@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Professional Competence
Public Health - standards
Social Class
Social Justice
Abstract
Social justice is a core value of public health. However, the public health core competencies for Canada document (release 1.0) does not contain any explicit reference to the essential attributes of social justice within the competencies themselves. We argue that social justice attributes should be integrated into the core competencies and propose examples for consideration.
PubMed ID
18457288 View in PubMed
Less detail

[International and national legal mechanisms of ensuring social justice for the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258674
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A Kh Abashidze
V S Malichenko
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Health Policy
Health Transition
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Internationality
National Health Programs
Needs Assessment
Population Dynamics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Work - organization & administration
Abstract
Increase in the proportion of older persons in the population of most countries entails a change in the scale and structure of morbidity, which requires higher expenditures on health care and social service. Maintaining health and activity of older people is an important indicator of the effectiveness of public policies in the field of health and social welfare. Under these conditions the development of effective measures to promote prosperous aging is required, which includes primarily legislative, administrative and other measures, as well as development of a strategy and action plan of socio-economic nature, taking into account the needs of older people.
PubMed ID
25306661 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sea otters, social justice, and ecosystem-service perceptions in Clayoquot Sound, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288093
Source
Conserv Biol. 2017 Apr;31(2):343-352
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Jordan Levine
Michael Muthukrishna
Kai M A Chan
Terre Satterfield
Source
Conserv Biol. 2017 Apr;31(2):343-352
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Female
Humans
Male
Otters
Public Opinion
Social Justice
Abstract
We sought to take a first step toward better integration of social concerns into empirical ecosystem service (ES) work. We did this by adapting cognitive anthropological techniques to study the Clayoquot Sound social-ecological system on the Pacific coast of Canada's Vancouver Island. We used freelisting and ranking exercises to elicit how locals perceive ESs and to determine locals' preferred food species. We analyzed these data with the freelist-analysis software package ANTHROPAC. We considered the results in light of an ongoing trophic cascade caused by the government reintroduction of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) and their spread along the island's Pacific coast. We interviewed 67 local residents (n = 29 females, n = 38 males; n = 26 self-identified First Nation individuals, and n = 41 non-First Nation individuals) and 4 government managers responsible for conservation policy in the region. We found that the mental categories participants-including trained ecologists-used to think about ESs, did not match the standard academic ES typology. With reference to the latest ecological model projections for the region, we found that First Nations individuals and women were most likely to perceive the most immediate ES losses from the trophic cascade, with the most certainty. The inverse was found for men and non-First Nations individuals, generally. This suggests that 2 historically disadvantaged groups (i.e., First Nations and women) are poised to experience the immediate impacts of the government-initiated trophic cascade as yet another social injustice in a long line of perceived inequities. Left unaddressed, this could complicate efforts at multistakeholder ecosystem management in the region.
PubMed ID
27406400 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous youth participatory action research: re-visioning social justice for social work with indigenous youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105197
Source
Soc Work. 2013 Oct;58(4):314-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Katie Johnston-Goodstar
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA. john1906@umn.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2013 Oct;58(4):314-20
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cultural Diversity
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Social Justice
Social Values
Social Work - methods
United States
Abstract
The NASW Code of Ethics identifies social justice as one of six foundational values of the social work profession. Indigenous communities have long questioned the authenticity of this commitment and rightly so, given the historical activities of social work and social workers. Still, the commitment persists as an inspiration for an imperfect, yet determined, profession. This article presents a theoretical discussion of questions pertinent for social justice in social work practice in Native American communities: Whose definition of social justice should prevail in work with and in Indigenous communities? What can a revisioning of social justice mean to the development of Native communities and for Native youths in particular? What methods or processes of social work are most appropriate for this social justice work? This article presents a case for the practice of youth participatory action research as one method to work for social justice in Native communities.
PubMed ID
24450018 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social justice and social determinants of health: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, intersexed, and queer youth in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145681
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Feb;23(1):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Deborah Dysart-Gale
Author Affiliation
General Studies Unit, Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. dysart@encs.concordia.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Feb;23(1):23-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bisexuality
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Nursing
Social Conditions
Social Justice
Transsexualism
Young Adult
Abstract
While nurses address lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, intersexed, and queer (henceforth LGBTIQ) patients' health needs, the professional nursing practice value of social justice provides a larger role for nurses in identifying and minimizing social barriers faced by LGBTIQ patients.
This paper examines the social and health-related experiences of LGBTIQ youth in Canada, a country which has removed many of the social and legal barriers faced by LGBTIQ in countries such as the United States. An awareness of the Canadian LGBTIQ experience is instructive for nurses in different countries, as it reveals both the possibilities and limitations of social legislation that is more inclusive of LGBTIQ youth.
Review of literature in PubMed, Academic Search Premier, government documents.
The literature reveals that exclusion, isolation, and fear remain realities for Canadian LGBTIQ adolescents. The Canadian experience suggests that negative social attitudes toward LGBTIQ persist despite progressive legislation. The value of social justice positions nurses to constructively intervene in promoting the health and well-being of LGBTIQ youth in the face of social homophobia.
PubMed ID
20122085 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enviro-Health Links - Environmental Justice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288463
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Publications
Other Publications Databases
Social Justice
Environment
Abstract
This National Library of Medicine (NLM) Enviro-Health Links site provides links and descriptions to environmental justice sites.
Online Resources
Less detail

Evidence of public value and public risk of electronic health records: an issue for social justice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173506
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):96-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Gordon Atherley
Author Affiliation
Greyhead Associates, Oakville, ON. atherley@sympatico.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):96-103
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Social Justice
Social Responsibility
PubMed ID
16078410 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sovereignty and social justice: how the concepts affect federal American Indian policy and American Indian health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291253
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2018; 33(4):259-270
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Donalee Unal
Author Affiliation
a Center for Social Work Education , Widener University , Chester , PA , USA.
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2018; 33(4):259-270
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The health disparities that are prevalent among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities are connected to the ideology of sovereignty and often ignored in social work and public health literature. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine the health outcomes of American Indians from the time of contact with European settlers to the present through the ideology of sovereignty and federal government AI health policy. The foundation for the health outcomes of AIs and the governmental policies affecting them lie in the ideology of tribal sovereignty. This ideology has greatly impacted how the government views and treats AIs and consequently, how it has impacted their health. From the earliest treaties between European settlers and AIs, this legal relationship has been and remains a perplexing issue. With the examination of tribal sovereignty comes the realization that colonization and governmental polices have greatly contributed to the many social and health problems that AIs suffer from today. Understanding that the health disparities that exist among AI/AN populations cannot only be attributed to individual behavior and choice but is driven by societal, economic and political factors may be used to inform social work education, practice, and research.
PubMed ID
29672243 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Bioethics. 2005 Oct;19(5-6):460-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Dwyer James
Author Affiliation
SUNY Upstate Medical University, Center for Bioethics and Humanities, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA. dwyerja@upstate.edu
Source
Bioethics. 2005 Oct;19(5-6):460-75
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Economics
Environment
Humans
Life expectancy
Malnutrition
Mortality
Political Systems
Social Change
Social Justice
Social Responsibility
World Health
Abstract
In Australia, Japan, Sweden, and Switzerland, the average life expectancy is now greater than 80 years. But in Angola, Malawi, Sierra Leone, and Zimbabwe, the average life expectancy is less than 40 years. The situation is even worse than these statistics suggest because average figures tend to mask inequalities within countries. What are we to make of a world with such inequal health prospects? What does justice demand in terms of global health? To address these problems, I characterize justice at the local level, at the domestic or social level, and at the international or global level. Because social conditions, structures, and institutions have such a profound influence on the health of populations, I begin by focusing attention on the relationship between social justice and health prospects. Then I go on to discuss health prospects and the problem of global justice. Here I distinguish two views: a cosmopolitan view and a political view of global justice. In my account of global justice, I modify and use the political view that John Rawls developed in The Law of Peoples. I try to show why an adequate political account must include three duties: a duty not to harm, a duty to reconstruct international arrangements, and a duty to assist.
PubMed ID
16425484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social justice, access and quality of healthcare in an age of austerity: users' perspective from rural Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287210
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1347476
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Sonja S Gustafsdottir
Kristjana Fenger
Sigridur Halldorsdottir
Thoroddur Bjarnason
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1347476
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Equity - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland
Male
Poverty
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Justice - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Iceland is sparsely populated but social justice and equity has been emphasised within healthcare. The aim of the study is to examine healthcare services in Fjallabyggð, in rural northern Iceland, from users' perspective and evaluate social justice, access and quality of healthcare in an age of austerity. Mixed-method approach with transformative design was used. First, data were collected with questionnaires (response rate of 53% [N=732] in 2009 and 30% [N=415] in 2012), and analysed statistically, followed by 10 interviews with healthcare users (2009 and 2014). The results were integrated and interpreted within Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Model. There was significantly less satisfaction with accessibility and variety of healthcare services in 2012 after services downsizing. Solid primary healthcare, good local elderly care, some freedom in healthcare choice and reliable emergency services were considered fundamental for life in a rural area. Equal access to healthcare is part of a fundamental human right. In times of economic downturn, people in rural areas, who are already vulnerable, may become even more vulnerable and disadvantaged, seriously threatening social justice and equity. With severe cutbacks in vitally important healthcare services people may eventually choose to self-migrate.
Notes
Cites: Health Policy. 2011 May;100(2-3):144-5021126793
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Feb;31(1):11-3216484666
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 May;42(3):310-824522231
Cites: J Rural Health. 2014 Winter;30(1):79-8824383487
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jul;43(5):514-725953954
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Mar 21;14 :13024649834
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Oct 26;74:2957626507717
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 May;42(3):235-4124492675
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2002;59:6-1112227959
Cites: World Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;4(1):18-2416633496
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2002;59:78-912227970
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2002;59:1-512227958
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):7-1724135426
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2015 Oct 29;14:11126510998
Cites: Med Care Res Rev. 2006 Dec;63(6):719-4117099123
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 Suppl):50-621382848
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jan 14;379(9811):103-522014679
Cites: BMJ. 2015 Jan 08;350:h8125569203
Cites: J Rural Health. 2015 Spring;31(2):146-5625219792
PubMed ID
28762300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community health clinical education in Canada: part 2--developing competencies to address social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152591
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Benita E Cohen
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba. benita cohen@umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Professional Competence
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Recently, several Canadian professional nursing associations have highlighted the expectations that community health nurses (CHNs) should address the social determinants of health and promote social justice and equity. These developments have important implications for (pre-licensure) CHN clinical education. This article reports the findings of a qualitative descriptive study that explored how baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada address the development of competencies related to social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health in their community health clinical courses. Focus group interviews were held with community health clinical course leaders in selected Canadian baccalaureate nursing programs. The findings foster understanding of key enablers and challenges when providing students with clinical opportunities to develop the CHN role related to social injustice, inequity, and the social determinants of health. The findings may also have implications for nursing programs internationally that are addressing these concepts in their community health clinical courses.
PubMed ID
19222394 View in PubMed
Less detail

American International Health Alliance joins Medical Advocates for Social Justice to launch HIV/AIDS Russian language Internet partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195703
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):90-1
Publication Type
Article
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2001 Jan-Feb;12(1):90-1
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
HIV Infections
Humans
International Cooperation
Internet
Language
Russia
Social Justice
United States
PubMed ID
11211677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational justice-bridging theory and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97968
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Elizabeth Townsend
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, and Center for Population studies/Ageing and Living Condition Programme, Umeå University, Sweden. ingeborg.nilsson@umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2010;17(1):57-63
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Occupational therapy
Prejudice
Social Justice
Abstract
The evolving theory of occupational justice links the concept to social justice and to concerns for a justice of difference: a justice that recognizes occupational rights to inclusive participation in everyday occupations for all persons in society, regardless of age, ability, gender, social class, or other differences. The purpose of this descriptive paper is to inspire and empower health professionals to build a theoretical bridge to practice with an occupational justice lens. Using illustrations from a study of leisure and the use of everyday technology in the lives of very old people in Northern Sweden, the authors argue that an occupational justice lens may inspire and empower health professionals to engage in critical dialogue on occupational justice; use global thinking about occupation, health, justice, and the environment; and combine population and individualized approaches. The authors propose that taking these initiatives to bridge theory and practice will energize health professionals to enable inclusive participation in everyday occupations in diverse contexts.
PubMed ID
20170412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-care access as a social determinant of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154706
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Elizabeth McGibbon
Josephine Etowa
Charmaine McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish , Nova Scotia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Nursing
Social Justice
Abstract
The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as important indicators of health and well-being. Health-care services (primary, secondary, tertiary care) have not until recently been considered an SDH. Inequities in access to health care are changing this view. These inequities include barriers faced by certain population groups at point of care, such as the lack of cultural competence of health-care providers. The authors show how a social justice perspective can help nurses understand how to link inequities in access to poorer health outcomes, and they call on nurses to break the cycle of oppression that contributes to these inequities.
PubMed ID
18856224 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Interacting Axes of Environmental, Health, and Social Justice Cumulative Impacts: A Case Study of the Blueberry River First Nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277127
Source
Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Oct 18;4(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-2016
Author
Maya K Gislason
Holly K Andersen
Source
Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Oct 18;4(4)
Date
Oct-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We consider the case of intensive resource extractive projects in the Blueberry River First Nations in Northern British Columbia, Canada, as a case study. Drawing on the parallels between concepts of cumulative environmental and cumulative health impacts, we highlight three axes along which to gauge the effects of intensive extraction projects. These are environmental, health, and social justice axes. Using an intersectional analysis highlights the way in which using individual indicators to measure impact, rather than considering cumulative effects, hides the full extent by which the affected First Nations communities are impacted by intensive extraction projects. We use the case study to contemplate several mechanisms at the intersection of these axes whereby the negative effects of each not only add but also amplify through their interactions. For example, direct impact along the environmental axis indirectly amplifies other health and social justice impacts separately from the direct impacts on those axes. We conclude there is significant work still to be done to use cumulative indicators to study the impacts of extractive industry projects-like liquefied natural gas-on peoples, environments, and health.
PubMed ID
27763548 View in PubMed
Less detail

673 records – page 1 of 34.