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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Advancing Oil Spill Response in Ice-Covered Waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301424
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
, Innovative Ventures; Anatoliy Polomoshnov, Sakhalin Oil and Gas Institute; Melanie Engram. Alaska Satellite Facility, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Jorma Rytkonen, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Publication design and layout by TerraGraphica of Anchorage, Alaska
  1 document  
Author
DF Dickins Associates Ltd
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1125061
Keywords
Sea ice
Oil spills
Response strategies
Abstract
The objective of this project is to identify programs and research and development projects that improve the ability of responders to deal with accidental oil spills in fresh or salt-water marine environments where there is ice. This includes spills that occur on top of or underneath solid, stable ice extending out from shore (land-fast), into an area of drifting ice floes (pack ice), or onto an ice-covered shoreline.
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Bayesian analysis of geographical variation in the incidence of Type I diabetes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192394
Source
Diabetologia. 2001 Oct;44 Suppl 3:B37-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M. Rytkönen
J. Ranta
J. Tuomilehto
M. Karvonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 2001 Oct;44 Suppl 3:B37-44
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bayes Theorem
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geography
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In Finland, the incidence of Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus among children aged 14 years or under is the highest in the world. The increase in incidence is approximately 3% per year. A marked geographical variation in incidence was reported in Finland during the late 1980s. Our aim was to explore the most recent regional pattern in incidence of Type I diabetes in Finland.
Data on the nationwide incidence of childhood diabetes in Finland was obtained from the Prospective Childhood Diabetes Registry for the periods 1987-1991 and 1992-1996. Population data was obtained from the National Population Registry. The geographical pattern of incidence was studied applying a Bayesian hierarchical approach and Geographical Information Systems. The inferences from the data was based on the estimated geographical intensity of diabetes.
There was a clear evidence of geographic variation for the risk of childhood diabetes during the entire 10-year period. The high-risk areas were found in the wide belt crossing the central part of Finland. Comparison of the estimated intensity of diabetes between the two 5-year periods showed that the geographical pattern of diabetes risk has changed over time. Our analyses also confirmed the existence of a few persistent high-risk and low-risk areas in Finland.
The finding of high-risk areas of childhood Type I diabetes suggests that specific genetic or environmental risk factors have become greater in certain geographic locations in Finland.
PubMed ID
11724415 View in PubMed
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Climate change effects on human health in a gender perspective: some trends in Arctic research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130978
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:59-64.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
. Int J of Circumpolar Health 2005; 64: 498�508. 11. Pedersen HS. Health in the Arctic and climate change. Polar Research 2007; 26: 104�6. 12. Hassi J, Rytkonen M, Kotaniemi J, Rintmaki H. Impacts of cold climate on heat balance, performance and health in circumpolar areas. Int J of Circumpolar
  1 document  
Author
Kukarenko Natalia
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Sciences, Northern Research Institute (NORUT), Tromsø, Norway. natalia.kukarenko@norut.no
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:59-64.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
210741
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biomedical Research - trends
Climate change
Cold Climate
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
World Health
Abstract
Climate change and environmental pollution have become pressing concerns for the peoples in the Arctic region. Some researchers link climate change, transformations of living conditions and human health. A number of studies have also provided data on differentiating effects of climate change on women's and men's well-being and health.
To show how the issues of climate and environment change, human health and gender are addressed in current research in the Arctic. The main purpose of this article is not to give a full review but to draw attention to the gaps in knowledge and challenges in the Arctic research trends on climate change, human health and gender.
A broad literature search was undertaken using a variety of sources from natural, medical, social science and humanities. The focus was on the keywords.
Despite the evidence provided by many researchers on differentiating effects of climate change on well-being and health of women and men, gender perspective remains of marginal interest in climate change, environmental and health studies. At the same time, social sciences and humanities, and gender studies in particular, show little interest towards climate change impacts on human health in the Arctic. As a result, we still observe the division of labour between disciplines, the disciplinary-bound pictures of human development in the Arctic and terminology confusion.
Efforts to bring in a gender perspective in the Arctic research will be successful only when different disciplines would work together. Multidisciplinary research is a way to challenge academic/disciplinary homogeneity and their boundaries, to take advantage of the diversity of approaches and methods in production of new integrated knowledge. Cooperation and dialogue across disciplines will help to develop adequate indicators for monitoring human health and elaborating efficient policies and strategies to the benefit of both women and men in the Arctic.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):51-6117451134
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):113-2817515251
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Jun;66(3):199-21417655061
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):8-2618468256
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Feb;68(1):84-9119331244
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):99-10520167160
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):383-9320719108
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):442-5016440606
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):459-6716440608
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):478-8616440610
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):487-9716440611
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):498-50816440612
PubMed ID
21949499 View in PubMed
Documents

Natalia-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Coping with stress and by stress: Russian men and women talking about transition, stress and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160728
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(2):327-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Ilkka Pietilä
Marja Rytkönen
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. ilkka.pietila@uta.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(2):327-38
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Social Change
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Several studies have claimed stress to be a major reason for poor public health in Russia and referred to significant social changes as a reason for the high level of perceived stress among Russians. This article aims to examine how stress and its relation to health are interpreted in the context of everyday life in Russian men's and women's interview talk with a focus on descriptions of recent social changes. The research material consists of 29 thematic interviews of men and women from St. Petersburg aged 15-81. In the analysis of contextual constructions of stress, we found that stress was used not only within a context of an individual's own life as an expression of a strained psycho-physiological state but also denoted larger societal processes and changes. In addition to individual experiences, the whole of Russian society was described as suffering from stress. Throughout the material, most interviewees, whilst outspokenly blaming stress for deteriorating physical health, met difficulties in making concrete these negative influences. Based on analysis, we interpret our interviewees' accounts of stress as a part of the cultural discourse wherein 'stress' serves as a conceptual tool in making interpretations about both the people and their social environment. Stress, as a concept, has emerged in a wide range of different institutional sites, such as the media and public health policy and has become a discursive entity of contemporary social life in Russia. We claim that it has simultaneously become an intermediary concept articulating a shared, cultural experience of the changes in Russian society and their effects on individuals' everyday life and health. Thus, the concept of stress helps people to articulate, make sensible, and cope with the impacts of transition on their individual lives.
PubMed ID
17949875 View in PubMed
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Diet shift induced rapid evolution of size and function in a predatory bird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264271
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Nov;176(3):781-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Risto Tornberg
Laura Liuska
Seppo Rytkönen
Marko Mutanen
Panu Välimäki
Source
Oecologia. 2014 Nov;176(3):781-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Evolution
Body Size
Diet
Female
Finland
Hawks - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Male
Phenotype
Predatory Behavior
Abstract
A predator's body size correlates with its prey size. Change in the diet may call for changes in the hunting mode and traits determining hunting success. We explored long-term trends in sternum size and shape in the northern goshawk by applying geometric morphometrics. Tetraonids, the primary prey of the goshawk, have decreased and been replaced by smaller birds in the diet. We expected that the size of the goshawk has decreased accordingly more in males than females based on earlier observations of outer morphology. We also expected changes in sternum shape as a function of changes in hunting mode. Size of both sexes has decreased during the preceding decades (1962-2008), seemingly reflecting a shift in prey size and hunting mode. Female goshawks hunting also mammalian prey tend to have a pronouncedly "Buteo-type" sternum compared to males preying upon birds. Interestingly, the shrinkage of body size resulted in an increasingly "Buteo-type" sternum in both sexes. In addition, the sternum shape in birds that died accidentally (i.e., fit individuals) was more Buteo-type than in starved ones, hinting that selection was towards a Buteo-type sternum shape. We conclude that these observed patterns are likely due to directional selection driven by changes in the diet towards smaller and more agile prey. On the other hand, global warming is predicted to also cause a decrease in size, thus these two scenarios are inseparable. Because of difficulties in studying fitness-related phenotypic changes of large raptors in the field, time series of museum exemplars collected over a wide geographical area may give answers to this conundrum.
PubMed ID
25217047 View in PubMed
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Different Seasonal Patterns in Song System Volume in Willow Tits and Great Tits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274536
Source
Brain Behav Evol. 2016 Jul 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2016
Author
Georgia K Longmoor
C Henrik Lange
Hannah Darvell
Lauren Walker
Seppo Rytkönen
Emma Vatka
Esa Hohtola
Markku Orell
Tom V Smulders
Source
Brain Behav Evol. 2016 Jul 22;
Date
Jul-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In most species of seasonally breeding songbirds studied to date, the brain areas that control singing (i.e. the song control system, SCS) are larger during the breeding season than at other times of the year. In the family of titmice and chickadees (Paridae), one species, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), shows the typical pattern of seasonal changes, while another species, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), shows, at best, very reduced seasonal changes in the SCS. To test whether this pattern holds up in the two Parid lineages to which these two species belong, and to rule out that the differences in seasonal patterns observed were due to differences in geography or laboratory, we compared the seasonal patterns in two song system nuclei volumes (HVC and Area X) in willow tits (Poecile montanus), closely related to black-capped chickadees, and in great tits (Parus major), more closely related to blue tits, from the same area around Oulu, Finland. Both species had larger gonads in spring than during the rest of the year. Great tit males had a larger HVC in spring than at other times of the year, but their Area X did not change in size. Willow tits showed no seasonal change in HVC or Area X size, despite having much larger gonads in spring than the great tits. Our findings suggest that the song system of willow tits and their relatives may be involved in learning and producing nonsong social vocalizations. Since these vocalizations are used year-round, there may be a year-round demand on the song system. The great tit and blue tit HVC may change seasonally because the demand is only placed on the song system during the breeding season, since they only produce learned vocalizations during this time. We suggest that changes were not observed in Area X because its main role is in song learning, and there is evidence that great tits do not learn new songs after their first year of life. Further study is required to determine whether our hypothesis about the role of the song system in the learned, nonsong vocalizations of the willow tit and chickadee is correct, and to test our hypothesis about the role of Area X in the great tit song system.
PubMed ID
27442125 View in PubMed
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Effect of national recommendation on sweet selling as an intervention for a healthier school environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261779
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Feb;43(1):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Jaakko Anttila
Tatu Rytkönen
Rami Kankaanpää
Mimmi Tolvanen
Satu Lahti
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Feb;43(1):27-34
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candy - statistics & numerical data
Carbonated Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nutrition Policy
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Social Environment
Abstract
In 2007, the Finnish National Board of Education (FNBE) and the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) gave a national recommendation that Finnish upper comprehensive schools should not sell sweet products. The aim was to find out how the national recommendation changed the schools' selling of sweet products.
This longitudinal survey was conducted in Finnish upper comprehensive school classes 7-9 (13-15-year-old pupils) in 2007 and 2010. All the schools (N=970) were invited to answer the questionnaire and 237 schools answered in both years (response rate 24%). The questionnaires contained questions concerning the selling of sweet and healthy products and school policy on sweet selling guidelines. Of the nine items in the questionnaire, three weighted sum scores were formed for oral health promotion: Exposure, enabling and policy (higher score indicating better actions). These sum scores were also trichotomized. Statistical significances of the changes were analyzed using nonparametric Wilcoxon's test, McNemar's test, and McNemar-Bowker's test.
Schools had decreased exposure of pupils to sweet products (p
PubMed ID
25425227 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81772
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Sep;51(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Mäkinen Tiina M
Raatikka Veli-Pekka
Rytkönen Mika
Jokelainen Jari
Rintamäki Hannu
Ruuhela Reija
Näyhä Simo
Hassi Juhani
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, University of Oulu, Finland. tiina.makinen@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Sep;51(1):27-36
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study (n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),
PubMed ID
16788837 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.