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442 records – page 1 of 45.

3-year follow-up of patients randomised in the metoprolol in dilated cardiomyopathy trial. The Metoprolol in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (MDC) Trial Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10861
Source
Lancet. 1998 Apr 18;351(9110):1180-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1998

A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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137 Cs levels of different population groups in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102842
Source
Acta Radiol Diagn (Stockh). 1966:Suppl 254:38-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

The ability to taste PTC among Swedish men and women (nulliparae and others).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66946
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1965
Author
T. Romanus
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Date
Oct-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Parity
Phenylthiourea
Pregnancy
Sweden
Taste
PubMed ID
5882608 View in PubMed
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[Abuse of drugs by hospital personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102446
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1965
Author
Ettlinger R, Rylander R.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70.
Date
Jun-30-1965
Language
Swedish
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital*
Substance-Related Disorders/rehabilitation*
Sweden
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Access to health services by Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302226
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
Author
Hansen, Ketil Lenert
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Finland
Greenland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Sami
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
The third chapter by Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen analyses the major health issues confronting Sami peoples in Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia and the Inuit in Greenland. The chapter includes an analysis of the unique challenges faced by the indigenous peoples living in the far north due to their specific socioenvironmental location with an increased risk of health problems compared with the average national statistics. Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen specifies the major constraints to delivering good quality health care in the North and at the same time outlines how traditional healing is being integrated within health services for indigenous peoples.
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[Acute otitis--a problem affecting children, families and health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288143
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H J Puhakka
Author Affiliation
Kliniken för öron-, näsoch strupsjukdomar, Abo Universitets-centralsjukhus.
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Date
1991
Language
Swedish
Geographic Location
Finland
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Family Health
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The true incidence of acute otitis media appears to be on the increase. According to the findings of a number of studies, acute otitis affects 40 per cent of all children during the first years of life. In the article are discussed the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and prevention of acute otitis media in children.
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[Acute splenic sequestration in children with sickle cell disease--an overview].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282445
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016 Dec 20;113
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2016
Author
Fredrik Larsson
Anders Åhlin
Mats Marshall Heyman
Jonas Abrahamsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016 Dec 20;113
Date
Dec-20-2016
Language
Swedish
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anemia, Sickle Cell - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Illness
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Infant
Male
Recurrence
Risk
Splenectomy
Splenic Diseases - etiology - pathology - surgery
Sweden
Abstract
Acute splenic sequestration in children with sickle cell disease - an overview Acute splenic sequestration (ASS) is a life-threatening complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). The condition is important to recognize due to the fact that it can occur with previously unknown disease. ASS is one of the most common causes of death in children with SCD and is the result of blood suddenly getting congested in the spleen, resulting in splenomegaly, acute anemia, and hypovolemic shock. Timely and appropriate treatment is essential in preventing death. Episodes of ASS before one year of age are associated with a higher risk of recurrence. There is no established effective treatment for recurrent ASS; however, there is evidence that all children with SCD should be treated with hydroxyurea. In Sweden, our recommendation is to evaluate the indications for splenectomy after the first episode of ASS. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment, and all children with SCD should be evaluated with regard to the potential success of HSCT. This article presents an overview of the condition with Swedish recommendations.
PubMed ID
28026839 View in PubMed
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Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: Four Nordic public health policies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101197
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vallgårda, S
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Health Policy
Health promotion
Liberalism
Nordic countries
Public Health
Responsibility
Social Conditions
Social democracy
Abstract
AIMS: To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy. METHODS: Analyses of recent public health programs in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. RESULTS: Focus is on either, or both, individual behavior and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programs is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish program is the most liberal focusing on behaviors and individual's choices; the Norwegian program is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programs lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population. CONCLUSIONS: No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programs contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behavior versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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442 records – page 1 of 45.