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486 records – page 1 of 49.

Helicobacter pylori in a Chukotka Native male population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2888
Source
Pages 293-295 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Helicobacter pylori in a Chukotka Native Male Population Oleg V. Reshetnikov, Yuri P. Nikitin, Mikhail V. Kholmogortsev, Svetlana A. Kurilovich, and Oleg A. Pycllik Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a widespread human pathogen closely
  1 document  
Author
Reshetnikov, O.V.
Nikitin, Y.P.
Kholmogortsev, M.V.
Kurilovich, S.A.
Pycllik, O.A.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 293-295 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Chukotka
Gastric endoscopy
Gastritis
Helicobacter pylori
Indigenous peoples
Russia
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a widespread human pathogen closely associated with gastroduodenal diseases. Thirty-four males from one of the settlements of coastal Chukotka (72% of total adult male population, mean age 31.6 years) underwent upper endoscopy, and HP was examined histologically in antral biopsies (Giemsa stain). Histology revealed normal mucosa in 16%, antral superficial gastritis in 29%, and atrophic gastritis in 55%. HP was found in 40% of histological specimens of normal mucosa, in 100% of superficial gastritis, and in 77% of atrophic gastritis. Correlation was found between the degree of bacterial contamination and both the activity of gastritis and grade of mononuclear infiltration. Data indicate a high prevalence of HP among Chukotka Natives (77%) which may partly explain the significant frequency of antral gastritis in this population.
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Cardiovascular risk factors in the adolescent population of Chukotka

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2889
Source
Pages 299-301 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Adolescent Population of Chukotka Diana V. Denisova, Irina P. Beresovikova, and Jamila B. Efendieva Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: Representative samples of adolescents of both sexes, aged 15-17, who were residents of coastal
  1 document  
Author
Denisova, D.V.
Beresovikova, I.P.
Efendieva, J.B.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 299-301 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent health
Blood lipids
Canada
Cardiovascular disease
Chukotka
Indigenous peoples
Risk factors
Abstract
Representative samples of adolescents of both sexes, aged 15-17, who were residents of coastal and tundra Chukotka settlements (325 subjects) have been examined. The survey was conducted according to methods based on WHO recommendations. The program included a questionnaire, two measurements of arterial blood pressure, anthropometry, and assessment of blood lipid levels. The prevalence of smoking in boys was 40%; in girls, 19%. High systolic BP occurred more often in newly arrived boys (25%). Hypercholesterolemia was minimal in Chukotka Natives (5%), as was hypertriglyceridemia. The prevalence of low HDL cholesterol was highest (48%) in Native boys. Lipid disorders in Chukotka Native children obviously result from an unbalanced diet. High levels of arterial blood pressure in non-Native adolescents of Chukotka are probably caused by stress on the adaptation system under severe conditions in the North.
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Left ventricular hypertrophy in northern and Siberian populations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2892
Source
Pages 312-315 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Northern and Siberian Populations Sofia Malyutina, Andrew Ryabikov, Michail Voevoda, Michail Dolgych, Tatyana Benyuch, and Yuri Nikitin Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: Characteristics of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were
  1 document  
Author
Malyutina, S.
Ryabikov, A.
Voevoda, M.
Dolgych, M.
Benyuch, T.
Nikitin, Y.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 312-315 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cardiac ventricular hypertrophy
Chukotka
Hereditary disease
Indigenous peoples
Novosibirsk
Russia
Abstract
Characteristics of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were investigated in random samples of the Chukotka coastal Native population (131 males) and in the urban Novosibirsk population (627 males) aged 30-59. Standard epidemiological methods employing electrocardiography (EKG) and echocardiography (EchoCG) were used. The frequency of EKG-LVH in the urban population was about six percent. The prevalence of LVH in Chukotka was more than twice as high as in Novosibirsk, as determined by both EKG and EchoCG criteria. About half of EchoCG-LVH cases in Natives and one-fifth of those in the city population could not be explained by conventional reasons. Advanced family surveys in Novosibirsk established the fact that myocardial hypertrophy exhibits a family aggregation in first-degree relatives of normotensive probands affected by LVH. The data demonstrate an inherited predisposition for LVH and suggest the need for molecular-genetic analysis.
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Dietary fat and disease patterns in Chukotka Native adults

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2896
Source
Pages 325-328 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Dietary Fat and Disease Patterns in Chukotka Native Adults Farida R. Mamleeva, Jamila B. Efendieva, and Yuri P. Nikitin Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: It is well documented that dietary patterns have been changing for northern indigenous peoples as they adapt
  1 document  
Author
Mamleeva, F.R.
Efendieva, J.B.
Nikitin, Y.P.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 325-328 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska-Siberia Medical Research Program
Blood lipids
Chukotka
Diet
Disease patterns
Indigenous peoples
Nutrients
Siberia
Abstract
It is well documented that dietary patterns have been changing for northern indigenous peoples as they adapt to a contemporary lifestyle. Recent dietary research among Chukotka Native adults showed a higher intake of saturated fatty acids (15% of energy) and sugar, and lower content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (5%) compared with our previous studies. We showed a higher percentage of dietary fat from animal fats (31%) and meat products (28%) than from seafoods and fish, which provide only 11% of daily fat intake. Increasing use of marketed foods and decreasing consumption of traditional foods among Chukotka Native adults contribute to more frequent cases of overweight, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Dietary recommendations with an emphasis on traditional eating patterns should be considered for promotion of a healthy diet in Chukotka inhabitants. Promoting local foods of high biological value and establishing educational nutrition programs are of great importance.
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Persistent organic compounds in women residing in the Russian Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2906
Source
Pages 555-560 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Persistent Organic Compounds in Women Residing in the Russian Arctic Valeri P. Klopov Regional Centre for Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg, Russia Abstract: Within the framework of a joint Russian-Norwegian project on human health assessment under the eight-nation Arctic Monitoring
  1 document  
Author
Klopov, V.P.
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg, Russia
Source
Pages 555-560 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Industrial pollution
Inuit
Maternal and child health
Persistent organic compounds
Russia
PCBs
Pesticides
Abstract
Within the framework of a joint Russian-Norwegian project on human health assessment under the eight-nation Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, a study of persistent organic compounds was conducted in 42 non-indigenous women who delivered in the hospitals of Norilsk and Salekhard during February and March 1995. Samples of venous blood, breast milk, umbilical cord blood, and placental tissue were collected. The concentration of organochlorines (chlorinated pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls) was estimated by high-resolution gas chromatography, and levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The results obtained are related to, first, the global transport of organochlorine contaminants not used in Arctic, and second, the level of local food consumption, especially freshwater fish, smoked and dried. A comparison of the results of this study with the data of the Inuit Health Survey was made. This has shown that the discrepancy between Canadian and Russian data may be explained by differing dietary factors.
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Levels of heavy metals in women residing in the Russian Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2911
Source
Pages 582-585 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Levels of Heavy Metals in Women Residing in the Russian Arctic Valeri P. Klopov Regional Centre for Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg, Russia Abstract: Within the framework of the joint Russian-Norwegian project on human health assessment of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment
  1 document  
Author
Klopov, V.P.
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg, Russia
Source
Pages 582-585 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program
Cadmium
Gold
Industrial pollution
Maternal and child health
Methylmercury
Nickel
Russia
Abstract
Within the framework of the joint Russian-Norwegian project on human health assessment of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, a study on heavy metals was conducted in 42 nonindigenous women who delivered in the hospitals of Norilsk and Salekhard during February-March 1995. Samples of venous blood, breast milk, umbilical cord blood, and placental tissue were collected. The concentration of lead, cadmium, and nickel in these tissues and fluids was estimated by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Total mercury concentration was measured by cold vapor AAS. The results obtained are determined, first, by the level of local food consumption, especially fish and reindeer meat; second, by smoking habits; and, third, by industrial pollution of ambient air, fresh water, and snow cover. A comparison of the results of this study with those of the Inuit Health Survey has shown that the difference between the Canadian and Russian data can be explained by factors of differing diet and differing levels of industrial pollution. Where a similar contaminant concentration in human tissues occurred, as in a smoking habit, no differences in the levels of a pollutant such as cadmium were revealed.
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Post-Soviet Russian indigenous health: the Sami people of the Kola Peninsula

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2921
Source
Pages 636-638 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
from Norway and Russia, together with the author, became acquainted with the health situa- tion and present health service of the indigenous population of the Kola Peninsula in Russia-the Sarni people. The Sarni Development Centre SEG from Tana, Norway, is coordinating the project. Dr. Marina
  1 document  
Author
Snellman, A.
Hetta, O.M.
Dubovtseva, M.
Author Affiliation
Provincial Government of Lapland, Finland
Source
Pages 636-638 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Health care consultation
Kola Peninsula
Russia
Sami
Abstract
As part of health care cooperation in the Barents Euroarctic Region, a group of indigenous physicians from Norway and Russia, together with the author, became acquainted with the health situation and present health service of the indigenous population of the Kola Peninsula in Russia--the Sami people. The Sami Development Centre SEG from Tana, Norway, is coordinating the project. Dr. Marina Dubovtseva visited Norwegian and Finnish Samiland in December 1995 and January 1996, and Dr. Ole Mathis Hetta and the author visited Lovozero in March 1996, looking through health care institutions as well as interviewing health care professionals and local people.
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Up-to-date studies of the Siberian population: international programs of the Institute of Internal Medicine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2940
Source
Pages 714-716 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Up-to-Date Studies of the Siberian Population: International Programs of the Institute of Internal Medicine N.V. Alekseeva, Yu.P. Nikitin, M.I. Voevoda, S.K. Malyutina, A.V. Tarasov, and T.E. Vinogradova Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: The worsening of the
  1 document  
Author
Alekseeva, N.V.
Nikitin, Yu.P.
Voevoda, M.I.
Malyutina, S.K.
Tarasov, A.V.
Vinogradova, T.E.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 714-716 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Institute of Internal Medicine
Research programs
Russia
Siberia
WHO programs
Abstract
The worsening of the health status of northern populations is a matter of concern to scientists in many countries. International collaboration aimed at using international experience in the field of circumpolar health may speed up the research, making it more effective for solving problems of medical science and public health in the North.
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Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS), Siberian Branch, activity in solving the medical problems of Russian circumpolar regions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2941
Source
Pages 717-718 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS), Siberian Branch, Activity in Solving the Medical Problems of Russian Circumpolar Regions Valery A. Trufak:in and Konstantin V. Gaidul RAMS, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: RAMS, Siberian Branch, has been actively participating for
  1 document  
Author
Trufakin, V.A.
Gaidul, K.V.
Author Affiliation
RAMS, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 717-718 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Research programs
Russia
Russian Academy of Medical Sciences
Siberian Branch
Abstract
RAMS, Siberian Branch, has been actively participating for the last 25 years in elaboration and realization of numerous scientifically applied programs aimed at improving diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis of the most widespread diseases among the Native and newcoming populations of the Russian Far North (Taimyr, Yakutia, and Chukotka). The medical researchers of different RAMS, Siberian Branch, institutes, based on long-term investigations, have obtained a number of largely new data on etiology, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of cardiovascular, infectious, and cancer disease; diabetes; alcohol addiction; trauma; etc., and have developed practical recommendations for public health institutions on improvement of people's health.
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Genetic polymorphism of CYP1A1 and CYP2D6 in the tundra Nentsi population of Siberia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2943
Source
Pages 725-729 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, Novosibirsk, Russia 2 Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: The purpose of this study was to establish the frequencies of CYPIA I and CYP2D6 polymor- phic genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, which is a small indigenous northern people living in Siberia and belonging to
  1 document  
Author
Lyakhovich, V.V.
Mitrofanov, D.V.
Gutkina, N.I.
Duzhak, T.G.
Posukh, O.L.
Osipova, L.P.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Molecular Pathology and Ecological Biochemistry, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 725-729 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Genetics
Indigenous peoples
Polymorphic genotypes
Russia
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to establish the frequencies of CYP1A1 and CYP2D6 polymorphic genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, which is a small indigenous northern people living in Siberia and belonging to the Northern Mongoloid race. The frequencies of Ile/Ile, Ile/Val, and Val/Val genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, as determined by means of the allele-specific PCR, were 50.8%, 39.2%, and 10%, respectively. Thus, the Val allele frequency in Tundra Nentsi appeared to be as high (29.5%) as in the Japanese population (25%) reported elsewhere. Those frequencies in the reference group of Siberian Caucasians were in good agreement with the data reported elsewhere for other Caucasians, although the Val allele frequency observed in Siberia inhabitants (5.7%) was somewhat higher than those frequencies obtained for other Caucasian populations. By means of PCR followed by specific-site digestion with MvaI endonuclease, we analysed the frequencies of CYP2D6B allele in the Tundra Nentsi population. The frequencies of 2D6wt/2D6wt and 2D6wt/B in the group of 120 Nentsi were 84.2% and 15.8%, respectively, with no subject possessing the 2D6B/2D6B genotype. The group of Siberian Caucasians represented those frequencies as 67.7%, 27.1%, and 5.2%, respectively. In total, the frequency of CYP2D6B allele in the Tundra Nentsi population was half that in Caucasians (8.3% vs. 19%). Taken together, our data indicate that the frequencies of CYP2D6B and Val allele of CYP1A1 in Tundra Nentsi population are different from those obtained for Caucasians. We also found similarities in the CYP1A1 mutation frequencies in the Tundra Nentsi and Japanese populations.
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486 records – page 1 of 49.