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311 records – page 1 of 32.

Access to health services by Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302226
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
Author
Hansen, Ketil Lenert
Source
Chapter 3 in State of the World's Indigenous Peoples. United Nations. ISBN 9789211303346. p.59-82.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Finland
Greenland
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Sami
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
The third chapter by Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen analyses the major health issues confronting Sami peoples in Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia and the Inuit in Greenland. The chapter includes an analysis of the unique challenges faced by the indigenous peoples living in the far north due to their specific socioenvironmental location with an increased risk of health problems compared with the average national statistics. Dr. Ketil Lenert Hansen specifies the major constraints to delivering good quality health care in the North and at the same time outlines how traditional healing is being integrated within health services for indigenous peoples.
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Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: Four Nordic public health policies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101197
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vallgårda, S
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Health Policy
Health promotion
Liberalism
Nordic countries
Public Health
Responsibility
Social Conditions
Social democracy
Abstract
AIMS: To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy. METHODS: Analyses of recent public health programs in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. RESULTS: Focus is on either, or both, individual behavior and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programs is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish program is the most liberal focusing on behaviors and individual's choices; the Norwegian program is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programs lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population. CONCLUSIONS: No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programs contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behavior versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
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Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277047
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Ingunn H Bergh
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Kari Glavin
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.
PubMed ID
26456410 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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The Adult Life After Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS) Study: Design and Characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302820
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2015 Dec;62(12):2204-10. doi: 10.1002/pbc.25661. Epub 2015 Jul 20.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Asdahl PH
Winther JF
Bonnesen TG
De Fine Licht S
Gudmundsdottir T
Anderson H
Madanat-Harjuoja L
Tryggvadottir L
Småstuen MC
Holmqvist AS
Hasle H
Olsen JH
ALiCCS Study Group
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2015 Dec;62(12):2204-10. doi: 10.1002/pbc.25661. Epub 2015 Jul 20.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Mortality
Therapy
Registries
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Epidemiology
Survivors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During the last five decades, survival of childhood cancer has increased from 25% to 80%. At the same time, however, it has become evident that survivors experience a broad range of therapy-related late adverse health effects. The aim of the Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS) study is to investigate long-term health consequences of past and current therapies in order to improve follow-up care of survivors and to reduce treatment-related morbidity of future patients.
PROCEDURE: Childhood cancer survivors were identified through the five Nordic cancer registries and a comparison cohort was established through random selection of cancer-free individuals from the civil registration systems. A unique personal identification number was used to link between different health registries. Abstraction of treatment information for a subset of survivors allows investigation of the association between the various components of cancer therapy and late occurring comorbidity.
RESULTS: The childhood cancer survivor cohort comprises 33,160 1-year survivors and the comparison cohort comprises 212,892 cancer free individuals from the general population. In the childhood cancer survivor cohort, all types of childhood cancer are represented including leukemia (21%), lymphoma (14%), central nervous system tumors (24%), sarcomas (5%), retinoblastoma (3%), and neuroblastoma (4%). Among the survivors, 22% have been followed beyond the age of 40 years.
CONCLUSION: The ALiCCS study constitutes a new large resource for research on late effects of childhood cancers that include all types of childhood malignancies and has followed a large proportion of the survivors well into late adulthood.
PubMed ID
26193842 View in PubMed
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Agglutinins and antibodies to Francisella tularensis outer membrane antigens in the early diagnosis of disease during an outbreak of tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38538
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
L. Bevanger
J A Maeland
A I Naess
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agglutination Tests
Agglutinins - analysis
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - immunology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Humans
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulins - immunology
Middle Aged
Norway
Tularemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Tularemia was diagnosed in 57 patients during an outbreak in central Norway in 1984 and 1985. Clinical categories of the disease showed seasonal variations. A bacterial microagglutination test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with class-specific antibodies against Francisella tularensis outer membrane (OM) antigens were evaluated for the early diagnosis of tularemia. ELISA with immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, or IgM antibodies and the microagglutination test differed only marginally in diagnostic sensitivity. The OM preparation harbored F. tularensis agglutinogens and contained a variety of proteins, several of which functioned as immunogens in tularemia patients, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). All 12 patients tested produced antibodies against a 43,000-molecular-weight OM protein. Individual variation was noted with regard to antibody response against other OM antigens. The OM is a suitable antigen preparation in ELISA for the diagnosis of tularemia and, presumably, contains antigens important in the immunobiology of tularemia.
PubMed ID
3356786 View in PubMed
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Air ambulance services in the Arctic 1999-2009: a Norwegian study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300739
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Norum J
Elsbak TM
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air ambulance
Statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air ambulance services in the Arctic have to deal with remote locations, long distances, rough weather conditions and seasonable darkness. Despite these challenges, the people living in the area expect a high quality of specialist health care. AIMS: The objective of this study was to analyse the air ambulance operations performed in the Norwegian Arctic and study variations in diagnoses and flight patterns around the year. METHODS: A retrospective analysis. All air ambulance operations performed during the time 1999 - 2009 period were analysed. The subjects were patients transported and flights performed. The primary outcome measures were patients' diagnoses and task patterns around the year. RESULTS: A total of 345 patients were transported and 321 flights performed. Coronary heart and vascular disease, bone fractures and infections were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (85%) had NACA score 3 or 4. Half of all fractures occurred in April and August. Most patients were males (66%), and one fourth was not Norwegian. The median flying time (one way) was 3 h 33 m. Ten percent of the flights were delayed, and only 14% were performed between midnight and 8.00 AM. The period April to August was the busiest one (58% of operations). CONCLUSIONS: Norway has run a safe air ambulance service in the Arctic for the last 11 years. In the future more shipping and polar adventure operations may influence the need for air ambulances, especially during summer and autumn.
PubMed ID
21407997 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Sapmi : Regional SWOT Analysis prepared for the 2014-202 Rural Development Programme and Maritime & Fisheries Fund.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301482
Source
Sametinget. 20 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
  1 document  
Author
Nilsson, Ingela
Holmstrom, Lisa C.Q.
Source
Sametinget. 20 pages.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Norway
Finland
Russia
Publication Type
Report
File Size
742567
Keywords
Sami
Language
Reindeer industry
Duodji (crafts)
Tourism
Food
Traditional knowledge
Documents

SWOT-Analysis-Spmi-2014-2020_samiparliament_160222.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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An examination of the myth of rampant Sami alcoholism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296736
Source
University of Texas at Austin. Sami Culture.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kunec, Kevin
Source
University of Texas at Austin. Sami Culture.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Sami
Alcoholism
Laestadianism
Notes
Online. Available from the University of Texas, Sami Web at https://www.laits.utexas.edu/sami/dieda/socio/alcohol.htm
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An outbreak of gastroenteritis among schoolchildren staying in a wildlife reserve: Thorough investigation reveals Norway's largest cryptosporidiosis outbreak

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101200
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):287-295
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Rimðelienë, G
Vold, L
Robertson, L
Nelke, C
S¸li, K
Johansen, ¨H
Thrana, FS
Nygård, K
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Parasitology laboratory, Institute for Food Safety and Infection, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway
Nore og Uvdal municipality, Norway
Kongsberg Food Safety Authority, Norway
Department of Microbiology, Vestfold Hospital, Tønsberg, Norway
Tønsberg Municipal Public Health Department, Tønsberg, Norway
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):287-295
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cryptosporidium
Cryptosporidium parvum
Disease outbreak
Gastroenteritis
Norway
Abstract
AIMS: In March and April 2009, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health was notified about two groups of schoolchildren with gastroenteritis following a stay at a Norwegian wildlife reserve. Although at first considered a typical norovirus outbreak, an investigation that considered other possibilities was initiated. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among schoolchildren visiting the reserve in the relevant weeks. A web-based questionnaire was distributed by email. Fecal samples of visitors and employees were analyzed. The premises were inspected, and water samples and animal feces analyzed. RESULTS: We received 141 replies (response rate 84%); 74 cases were identified. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in fecal samples from 9/12 (75%) visitors and 2/15 (13%) employees. One employee diagnosed with Cryptosporidium infection helped in the kitchen. Additionally, one pupil was diagnosed with norovirus infection. No food item was identified as a source of the outbreak. Pathogens were not detected in water samples taken in week 12, one week from the start of the outbreak. Escherichia coli, but not Cryptosporidium oocysts, were detected in water samples taken one month later. CONCLUSIONS: Although Cryptosporidium is seldom considered as an etiological agent of gastrointestinal illness in Norway, this outbreak indicates that it should not be excluded. In this cryptosporidiosis outbreak, the largest in Norway to date, the transmission vehicle was not definitively identified, but a food handler, water, and animal contact could not be excluded. We recommend improving hand hygiene routines, boiling drinking water, and emphasize that people who are unwell, particularly those working in catering, should stay away from work.
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311 records – page 1 of 32.