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Phylogenetic backgrounds and virulence profiles of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains from a case-control study using multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93223
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Jul;46(7):2280-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Afset Jan Egil
Anderssen Endre
Bruant Guillaume
Harel Josée
Wieler Lothar
Bergh KÃ¥re
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. jan.afset@ntnu.no
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Jul;46(7):2280-90
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Diarrhea - microbiology
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Escherichia coli Proteins - genetics
Fimbriae Proteins - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Microarray Analysis
Norway
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Shiga Toxins - genetics
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Atypical enteropathogenetic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains are frequently detected in children with diarrhea but are also a common finding in healthy children. The aim of this study was to compare the phylogenetic ancestry and virulence characteristics of atypical (eae positive, stx and bfpA negative) EPEC strains from Norwegian children with (n = 37) or without (n = 19) diarrhea and to search for an association between phylogenetic ancestry and diarrhea. The strains were classified in phylogenetic groups by phylogenetic marker genes and in sequence types (STs) by multilocus sequence typing. Phylogenetic ancestry was compared to virulence characteristics based on DNA microarray analysis. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were also performed. All four phylogenetic groups, 26 different STs, and 20 different clonal groups were represented among the 56 atypical EPEC strains. The strains were separated into three clusters by overall virulence gene profile; one large cluster with A, B1, and D strains and two clusters with group B2 strains. There was considerable heterogeneity in the PFGE profiles and serotypes, and almost half of the strains were O nontypeable. The efa1/lifA gene, previously shown to be statistically linked with diarrhea in this strain collection (J. E. Afset et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:3703-3711, 2006), was present in 8 of 26 STs. The two phylogenetic groups B1 and D were weakly associated with diarrhea (P = 0.06 and P = 0.09, respectively). In contrast, group B2 was isolated most frequently from healthy controls (P = 0.05). In conclusion, the atypical EPEC strains were heterogeneous both phylogenetically and by virulence profile. Phylogenetic ancestry was less useful as a predictor of diarrhea than were specific virulence genes.
PubMed ID
18463209 View in PubMed
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Information technology strategies for health and social care in Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68848
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):336-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Bergstrøm, R
Heimly, V
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Health Informatics, KITH, Trondheim, Norway. roald.bergstrom@kith.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):336-48
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community care
IT
National strategies
Norwegian Health Net
PACS
Telemedicine
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Provide an introduction to national IT strategies for the health and social sectors, and point out major challenges for the future of eHealth and Telemedicine in Norway. METHODS: The information provided in this article is based on reviews of national strategies and plans, and contact with projects and users in the health and social sectors. CONCLUSION: IT in health and social services has the potential to improve welfare, while simultaneously improving the efficiency of the systems. IT in home- and community-care will provide the users with better services closer to home in the coming years. National strategies and action plans are important, but the funding necessary for the recommended actions must also be provided. Organisational issues are important.
PubMed ID
15709310 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Telemedicine and eHealth in Norway: Administration and delivery of services

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68849
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Baardseng, T
Author Affiliation
Royal Ministry of Health, Department of Hospital Ownership, Oslo, Norway. Thomas.Neby-Baardseng@hd.dep.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):328-35
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
eHealth
Health Net
Information and communication technology (ICT)
Norway
Strategies
Telemedicine
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article reviews the situation in Norway concerning the administration and delivery of telemedicine and eHealth. METHODS AND RESULTS: By introducing the Norwegian hospital reform implemented in January 2002, the review provides the background allowing to understand the shift in strategy within this field in Norway. It also provides a historical context regarding the use and development of telemedicine in Norway. Since the implementation of the hospital reform, it can be argued that, presently, there has been a significant change in strategy from what can be described as a "muddling through"-strategy to a more rational approach, based on common and clearly defined goals. CONCLUSIONS: The hospital reform can be regarded as an important crossroads for the use of information and communication technology in Norway. The hypothesis put forward is that the development since the reform was implemented has strengthened both the willingness and the ability to make rational choices and take important steps forwards regarding the use of information and communication technology in the health sector in Norway, when discussing both telemedicine and eHealth.
PubMed ID
15709309 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Suicide among indigenous Sami in arctic Norway 1970-1998

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256641
Source
Page 432 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Silviken A
Haldorsen T
Kvernmo S
Author Affiliation
Center for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, Norway
Source
Page 432 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Sami
Norway
Suicide
Men
Women
Age
Living conditions
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
Documents
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The influence of religious factors on drinking behaviour among young indigenous Sami and non-Sami peers in Northern Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257473
Source
Page 434 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Spein AR
Melhus M
Kristiansen R
Kvernmo S
Author Affiliation
Center for Sami Health Research, Karasjojk
Department of Religious Studies, University of Tromso, Norway
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Department, University Hospital of North Norway/Regional Center for Norway
Source
Page 434 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Health
Religion
Laestadianism
Norway
Sámi
Alcoholism
Drinking
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
Documents
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The epidemiology of injuries in Svalbard compared with Harstad

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32033
Source
Pages 184-195 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
  1 document  
Author
Ytterstad, B
Norheim, A.J
Author Affiliation
Institute for Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. boergey@online.no
Source
Pages 184-195 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Injury
Leisure
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Prevention
Svalbard
Work
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To survey all injuries treated in Longyearbyen hospital, Svalbard and to describe the injury epidemiology for Svalbard (residents and visitors), comparing it with Harstad. SETTING: The Norwegian arctic archipelago, Svalbard and the mainland city Harstad during three years from 8 March 1997. PARTICIPANTS: The person years of the study were 4211 for Svalbard residents and 69,014 for Harstad. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The variables followed the Nordic system. Of 630 recorded injuries, 107 were snowmobile related. Crude injury rates (per 1000 person years) [corrected] for Svalbard residents were for men 100.9 and for women 76.3. Corresponding rates were not significantly higher for men in Harstad (115.4, p = 0.19) and for women (80.1, p = 0.56). Home injuries were more prevalent in Harstad (30.5%) compared to Svalbard residents (13.1%, p
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Circumpolar Health 2002 May;61(2):184
PubMed ID
11507968 View in PubMed
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Men's attitude to own health under the microscope

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96103
Source
Page 37 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Thunem, G.
Author Affiliation
KUN Center for Gender Equality
Source
Page 37 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cultural expressions of masculinity and femininity
Ethnicity
Gender relations
Lule Saami
Mortality
Norway
Public Health
Tysfjord
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Documents
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Economic volatility in childhood and subsequent adolescent mental health problems: a longitudinal population-based study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289789
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 09 18; 7(9):e017030
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-18-2017
Author
Tormod Bøe
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Børge Sivertsen
Mari Hysing
Keith J Petrie
Eric Dearing
Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 09 18; 7(9):e017030
Date
09-18-2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Poverty - psychology
Psychology, Adolescent
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the current paper was to investigate the association between the patterns of duration, timing and sequencing of exposure to low family income during childhood, and symptoms of mental health problems in adolescence.
Survey administered to a large population-based sample of Norwegian adolescents.
Survey data from 9154 participants of 16-19?years age (53% participation rate; 52.7% girls) were linked to registry-based information about childhood family income from tax return data.
Mental health outcomes were symptoms of emotional, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems and general mental health problems measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, symptoms of depression measured with Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) measured with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale.
Latent class analysis and the BCH approach in Mplus were used to examine associations between patterns of poverty exposure and mental health outcomes. Four latent classes of poverty exposure emerged from the analysis. Participants moving into poverty (2.3%), out of poverty (3.5%) or those chronically poor (3.1%) had more symptoms of mental health problems (Cohen's d=16-.50) than those with no poverty exposure (91.1%). This pattern was, however, not found for symptoms of ADHD. The pattern of results was confirmed in robustness checks using observed data.
Exposure to poverty in childhood was found to be associated with most mental health problems in adolescence. There was no strong suggestion of any timing or sequencing effects in the patterns of associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28928191 View in PubMed
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Harsh social conditions and perinatal survival: An age-period-cohort analysis of the World War II occupation of Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35660
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Sep;84(9):1463-1467
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
  1 website  
Author
Wilcox, AJ
Skjaerven, R
Irgens, LM
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Sep;84(9):1463-1467
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Mortality
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Social Conditions
War
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The hypothesis was tested that unfavorable social conditions are associated with poor perinatal survival through direct effects on pregnancy or, more indirectly, through effects on mothers born under such conditions. The occupation of Norway by Nazi Germany was used as a period of social hardship. METHODS. Data from Norwegian vital statistics and the Medical Birth Registry were used to describe perinatal mortality during World War II and also a generation later, among babies born to mothers who had themselves been born during the war. Logistic regression was used to identify a possible cohort effect among mothers born in 1940 through 1944 compared with mothers born before or after that period. RESULTS. Harsh conditions in Norway during the occupation increased childhood mortality. However, perinatal mortality declined during that period. Likewise, no adverse effect was seen on the survival of babies born to mothers who had themselves been born during the war (odds ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.04). CONCLUSIONS. We find no evidence that wartime conditions in Norway impaired perinatal survival, either directly or through an effect on women born during the war. These data underscore how little is known about the ways that social conditions influence perinatal mortality.
PubMed ID
8092372 View in PubMed
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Long-term continuation treatment after short-term day treatment of female patients with severe personality disorders: Body awareness group therapy versus psychodynamic group therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97350
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;64(2):115-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Harald Leirvåg
Geir Pedersen
Sigmund Karterud
Author Affiliation
Dagpost Kolonien, Sørlandet Hospital HF, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. harald@leirvag.com
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;64(2):115-22
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Body Image
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Day Care - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Long-Term Care
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the treatment effects of psychodynamic group therapy (PGT) and body awareness group therapy (BAGT) as outpatient treatment following day treatment for personality disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-one female patients given PGT were compared with 29 female patients receiving BAGT. The average length of outpatient therapy was 24 and 25 months, respectively. The patients were assessed trough the quality assurance system of the Norwegian Network of Psychotherapeutic Day Hospitals, including the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II) for diagnostic purposes. Outcome was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Symptom Check List 90-R sum score (Global Severity Index, GSI), Circumplex of Interpersonal Problems (CIP), at admission and at discharge from day treatment, and at the end of outpatient group therapy. RESULTS: Patients undertaking BAGT improved significantly on GAF, GSI and CIP, and reported high ratings of satisfaction with therapy and group climate at the end of outpatient treatment. The magnitude of change on GAF and CIP was significantly higher in the BAGT group compared with the PGT patients who displayed only minor changes after outpatient treatment. CONCLUSIONS: BAGT is possibly an effective outpatient continuation therapy for women with severe personality disorders, but because of limitations of this study, these results warrant a larger randomized study.
Notes
RefSource: Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;64(2):75-7
PubMed ID
20392134 View in PubMed
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228 records – page 1 of 23.