Skip header and navigation

Refine By

228 records – page 1 of 23.

Man and polar bear in Svalbard: a solvable ecological conflict?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2902
Source
Pages 532-534 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Risholt, T.
Persen, E.
Solem, O.I.
Author Affiliation
Longyearbyen Hospital, Norway
Source
Pages 532-534 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Injury prevention
Norway
Polar bear-human interaction
Svalbard
Abstract
The objective of this study is twofold. First, it is to assess the nature and magnitude of the polar bear-human conflict with respect to injuries to man and bear. Second, a major concern has been to minimize injurious interactions in order to safeguard the people who live and work in the Arctic, and, at the same time, secure the future of the polar bear in one of the last relatively unspoiled habitats on earth for big carnivores. From 1971 to 1995, approximately 80 bears were involved in serious bear-human interactions. Of these, 77 bears were killed and 3 escaped after having injured people. During the same period, 10 people were injured, 4 of them fatally, in 7 separate interactions, each involving a single bear. None of the victims carried an appropriate firearm. The circumstances leading up to the confrontations give strong reasons for supposing that the majority of the attacks were predatory in nature. Seven of the injured, including the four who were killed, sustained bites to the head and neck. Correct use of firearms could probably have prevented all the fatalities. However, the keeping and use of firearms caused two accidental deaths in the same period. We conclude that alertness, the absence of attractants (food, garbage), and appropriate bear repellents to secure field camps are important items in preventing conflicts and should always be available. However, as a last but indispensable resort, a firearm (rifle or shotgun) carried by an experienced user is the only safe precaution for avoiding injuries in polar bear country. Killing a bear on the rare occasions when humans are in danger presents no threat to the bear population. With regard to physical injury to people, the problem is a minor one. Bears have a dual impact on everyday life in the Svalbard settlements. While there is some anxiety related to the presence of bears, the polar bear is a source of breathtaking adventure highly valued by both residents and visitors.
Documents
Less detail

Developing Sami mental health service: From vision to implementation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96057
Source
Page 425 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Stordahl, V.
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health (SANKS)
Source
Page 425 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Finnmark, Norway
Mental health service
S�¡mi
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
Documents
Less detail

Men's attitude to own health under the microscope

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96103
Source
Page 37 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Thunem, G.
Author Affiliation
KUN Center for Gender Equality
Source
Page 37 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cultural expressions of masculinity and femininity
Ethnicity
Gender relations
Lule Saami
Mortality
Norway
Public Health
Tysfjord
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Documents
Less detail

Genetic composition and variation in Saami populations in northern Norway compared with Nordic populations in middle Norway. A study of non-metric skull variants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76744
Source
Pages 218-225 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Iregren, E.
Isberg, P.E.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Archeology
Department of Statistics, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
Source
Pages 218-225 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Genetic composition
Mandibular torus
Morphological traits
Non-metric traits
Nordic populations
Odontological research
Saamis (Lapps)
Documents
Less detail
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):474-475
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, T
Author Affiliation
Troms�¸, Norway
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):474-475
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Health service
Lapps
Norway
Documents

67-06-Norway the Land and the People.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Economic volatility in childhood and subsequent adolescent mental health problems: a longitudinal population-based study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289789
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 09 18; 7(9):e017030
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-18-2017
Author
Tormod Bøe
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Børge Sivertsen
Mari Hysing
Keith J Petrie
Eric Dearing
Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 09 18; 7(9):e017030
Date
09-18-2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Poverty - psychology
Psychology, Adolescent
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the current paper was to investigate the association between the patterns of duration, timing and sequencing of exposure to low family income during childhood, and symptoms of mental health problems in adolescence.
Survey administered to a large population-based sample of Norwegian adolescents.
Survey data from 9154 participants of 16-19?years age (53% participation rate; 52.7% girls) were linked to registry-based information about childhood family income from tax return data.
Mental health outcomes were symptoms of emotional, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems and general mental health problems measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, symptoms of depression measured with Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) measured with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale.
Latent class analysis and the BCH approach in Mplus were used to examine associations between patterns of poverty exposure and mental health outcomes. Four latent classes of poverty exposure emerged from the analysis. Participants moving into poverty (2.3%), out of poverty (3.5%) or those chronically poor (3.1%) had more symptoms of mental health problems (Cohen's d=16-.50) than those with no poverty exposure (91.1%). This pattern was, however, not found for symptoms of ADHD. The pattern of results was confirmed in robustness checks using observed data.
Exposure to poverty in childhood was found to be associated with most mental health problems in adolescence. There was no strong suggestion of any timing or sequencing effects in the patterns of associations.
Notes
Cites: J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2012 Jun;22(3):238-44 PMID 22537184
Cites: Child Dev Perspect. 2015 Sep 1;9(3):158-163 PMID 26442126
Cites: Child Dev. 2005 Jul-Aug;76(4):795-810 PMID 16026497
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;38(5):581-6 PMID 9255702
Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 2001 Jan;6(1):15-25 PMID 11199253
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2013 Jun;98(6):397-400 PMID 23564836
Cites: Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2007;16(2):52-65 PMID 17623385
Cites: Child Dev. 1985 Apr;56(2):361-75 PMID 3987413
Cites: Am Psychol. 2012 May-Jun;67(4):272-84 PMID 22583341
Cites: J Sleep Res. 2016 Jun;25(3):318-24 PMID 26825591
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2016 Apr;37(3):213-22 PMID 27035694
Cites: Child Dev. 2007 Jan-Feb;78(1):70-95 PMID 17328694
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2012 Apr;36(2):106-8 PMID 22487341
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2006 Mar;42(2):237-52 PMID 16569163
Cites: Child Dev. 2001 Nov-Dec;72(6):1779-93 PMID 11768145
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2008 Apr;36(3):411-9 PMID 18161021
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2010 Jun;46(6):538-44 PMID 20472210
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;12(1):1-8 PMID 12601558
Cites: Child Dev. 1994 Apr;65(2 Spec No):296-318 PMID 7516849
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2006 Nov;42(6):1154-67 PMID 17087549
Cites: Child Dev. 2002 Nov-Dec;73(6):1861-79 PMID 12487499
Cites: Child Dev. 1992 Jun;63(3):526-41 PMID 1600820
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Aug;94(8):1372-7 PMID 15284046
Cites: Front Psychol. 2013 Sep 11;4:613 PMID 24062708
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2014;42(5):705-15 PMID 24150864
Cites: Psychol Med. 2005 Feb;35(2):245-56 PMID 15841682
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;17 (9):643-53 PMID 17553702
Cites: Child Dev. 2010 Jan-Feb;81(1):306-25 PMID 20331669
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2006 Jun;34(3):379-91 PMID 16649000
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1557-66 PMID 22183690
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2014 Sep;26(3):752-62 PMID 24749755
Cites: Child Youth Serv Rev. 2010 Sep 1;32(9):1138-1148 PMID 20689675
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;177:534-9 PMID 11102329
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1996 Sep;37(3):207-20 PMID 8898493
Cites: Child Dev. 2015 Mar-Apr;86(2):425-40 PMID 25345342
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 May;55(5):436-45 PMID 24274762
PubMed ID
28928191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal health in northern Norway. Time trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4613
Source
Pages 475-480 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Bergsjø, P.
Bergsjo, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bergen, Norway
Source
Pages 475-480 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Maternal mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
3272667 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Cancer anxiety and attitudes toward mammography among screening attenders, nonattenders, and women never invited

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24517
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1992 Feb;82(2):249-251
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
  1 website  
Author
Gram, IT
Slenker, SE
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsö, Norway
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1992 Feb;82(2):249-251
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
False Positive Reactions
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Mass Screening - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
A mailed questionnaire survey was conducted among the following groups: 179 women who screened false positive at a free mammography screening; a random sample of 250 women who screened negative; 670 nonattenders of the screening; and a random population sample of 250 women who lived in another city and were not invited, but were otherwise comparable. The most frequently reported reason for nonattendance was not having the opportunity. Furthermore, only 18% of the nonattenders reported anxiety about breast cancer compared with 33% of the population sample (P less than .05). Ninety-nine percent of the women who attended indicated a positive attitude toward mammography that had not been adversely affected by screening experiences.
PubMed ID
1739156 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

Home injuries among adults in Stavanger, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72934
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):400-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
  1 website  
Author
Kopjar, B
Wickizer, TM
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):400-404
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Norwegian injury register data were analyzed to examine unintentional home injuries among persons ages 25 to 64 years residing in Stavanger, Norway, during 1992. A total of 782 persons received medical treatment for injury during 1992 (15.4 per 1000 population). The incidence was similar for males and females (15.8 and 14.9 per 1000 population); however, the exposure-specific injury rate was significantly higher for males (6.0 vs 4.1 per 1 million person-hours). This difference was entirely due to the much higher injury rate among males aged 25 to 44 years. The estimated first year cost (direct and indirect) per injury was $2700. Home injuries among adults appear to be an overlooked public health problem that warrants increased attention.
PubMed ID
8604768 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

Field investigations of tularemia in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34882
Source
FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1996 Mar;13(3):191-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
B P Berdal
R. Mehl
N K Meidell
A M Lorentzen-Styr
O. Scheel
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defence Microbiological Laboratory, Geitmyrsveien 75, Oslo, Norway.
Source
FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1996 Mar;13(3):191-5
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Humans
Mice
Norway - epidemiology
Rabbits
Rats
Ticks
Tularemia - epidemiology
Abstract
In Norway, tularemia is a common disease in small rodent and hare populations, where large outbreaks can be observed. In humans, the yearly number of cases is low, usually less than ten, with peaks up to 44 recorded in recent years. Serological investigations on hunters and healthy school children nevertheless indicate, with up to 4.7% positivity in the latter group, that Francisella tularensis low-grade infection is widespread. F. tularensis in co-culture with amoebae, e.g. Achantamoeba castellanii, may grow after internalization and kill the amoeba. As with Legionella, Francisella virulence may be enhanced after protozoan ingestion. This suggests a mechanism that can explain the pattern of dissemination and infection in our region.
PubMed ID
8861027 View in PubMed
Less detail

228 records – page 1 of 23.