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228 records – page 1 of 23.

[The air ambulance service in Bodö].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190840
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 10;122(4):429
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2002

Naturally acquired tuberculin sensitivity in Norway. Results of skin testing with ten mycobacterial antigens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45392
Source
Acta Tuberc Pneumol Scand. 1964;43:275-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
1964
Author
T. Bjerkedal
Source
Acta Tuberc Pneumol Scand. 1964;43:275-98
Date
1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens
Child
Mycobacterium
Mycobacterium Infections
Norway
Skin Tests
Statistics
Tuberculin Test
PubMed ID
14165364 View in PubMed
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Lower respiratory tract infections among Norwegian infants with siblings in day care

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34633
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
  1 website  
Author
Nafstad, P
Hagen, JA
Botten, G
Jaakkola, JJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Day Care
Environmental Exposure
Family Health
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Family
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the role of siblings in day care as a determinant of infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections. METHODS: A total of 3238 children (86%) out of 3754 Oslo, Norway, newborns recruited in 1992/93 were followed for 1 year. RESULTS: In logistic regression analysis, the risk of infection was increased in (1) infants with one or more siblings compared with infants without siblings (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.84, 2.85) and (2) infants with one or more siblings in day care compared with infants with siblings not in day care (adjusted OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.21, 2.26). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that siblings in day care outside the home increase infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections.
PubMed ID
8876520 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Spina bifida and cleft lip among newborns of Norwegian women with epilepsy: Changes related to the use of anticonvulsants

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34634
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1454-1456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
  1 website  
Author
King, PB
Lie, RT
Irgens, LM
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, Norway
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1454-1456
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cleft Palate - chemically induced - epidemiology
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Prevalence
Registries
Spinal Dysraphism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Teratogens
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined the connection between the use of anticonvulsants for epilepsy during or before pregnancy and the risk of spina bifida and cleft lip in newborns. METHODS: Among mothers registered from 1967 to 1992 by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 7588 who had epilepsy were identified and their newborns' prevalence of spina bifida and cleft lip examined. RESULTS: The odds ratio of spina bifida in children of mothers with epilepsy compared with other children increased from 1.5 in 1967 through 1980 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3, 4.5) to 4.4 in 1981 through 1992 (95% CI = 2.0, 8.5). The odds ratio of cleft lip, however, decreased from 3.0 before 1981 (95% CI = 1.6, 5.1) to 1.1 after 1981 (95% CI = 0.4, 2.3). CONCLUSIONS: This shift toward more serious birth defects is consistent with the different teratogenic effects of newer and older anticonvulsants.
PubMed ID
8876519 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Identification of virulence genes linked with diarrhea due to atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli by DNA microarray analysis and PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80330
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2006 Oct;44(10):3703-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Afset Jan Egil
Bruant Guillaume
Brousseau Roland
Harel Josée
Anderssen Endre
Bevanger Lars
Bergh KÃ¥re
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, St. Olavs University Hospital, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway. jan.afset@ntnu.no.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2006 Oct;44(10):3703-11
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - microbiology
Escherichia coli - genetics
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis - methods
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Virulence
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
The role of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in childhood diarrhea is controversial. The aim of the present study was to search for genes linked with diarrhea in atypical EPEC strains from a case-control study among Norwegian children. Using DNA microarray analysis, genomic DNAs from strains isolated from children with (n = 37) and without (n = 20) diarrhea were hybridized against 242 different oligonucleotide probes specific for 182 virulence genes or markers from all known E. coli pathotypes. PCR was performed to test the strains for seven putative virulence genes not included in the microarray panel. The OI-122 gene efa1/lifA was the gene with the strongest statistical association with diarrhea (P = 0.0008). Other OI-122 genes (set/ent, nleB, and nleE) and genes with other locations (lpfA, paa, ehxA, and ureD) were also associated with diarrheal disease. The phylogenetic marker gene yjaA was negatively associated with diarrhea (P = 0.0004). Atypical EPEC strains could be classified in two main virulence groups based on their content of OI-122, lpfA, and yjaA genes. Among children with diarrhea, atypical EPEC isolates belonging to virulence group I (OI-122 and lpfA positive, yjaA negative) were the most common, while the majority of isolates from healthy children were classified as virulence group II strains (OI-122 negative, lpfA and yjaA positive; P
PubMed ID
17021100 View in PubMed
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Consumption of soft drinks and hyperactivity, mental distress, and conduct problems among adolescents in Oslo, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80467
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2006 Oct;96(10):1815-1820
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
  1 website  
Author
Lien, L
Lien, N
Heyerdahl, S
Thoresen, M
Bjertness, E
Author Affiliation
Section for Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. lars.lien@medisin.uio.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2006 Oct;96(10):1815-1820
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychomotor Agitation - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sucrose - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined whether high levels of consumption of sugar-containing soft drinks were associated with mental distress, hyperactivity, and conduct problems among adolescents. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted with 10th-grade students in Oslo, Norway (n = 5498). We used the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to assess mental health outcomes. RESULTS: There was a J-shaped dose-response relationship between soft drink consumption and mental distress, conduct problems, and total mental health difficulties score; that is, adolescents who did not consume soft drinks had higher scores (indicating worse symptoms) than those who consumed soft drinks at moderate levels but lower scores than those with high consumption levels. The relationship was linear for hyperactivity. In a logistic regression model, the association between soft drink consumption and mental health problems remained significant after adjustment for behavioral, social, and food-related variables. The highest adjusted odds ratios were observed for conduct problems among boys and girls who consumed 4 or more glasses of sugar-containing soft drinks per day. CONCLUSIONS: High consumption levels of sugar-containing soft drinks were associated with mental health problems among adolescents even after adjustment for possible confounders.
PubMed ID
17008578 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Sami traditions: Márkomeannu's contribution to the revitalization of Sami food traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295943
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Autumn 2014
  1 document  
Author
Berg, Elisabeth
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Date
Autumn 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
3175632
Keywords
Skånland
Sami
Traditional diet
Articulation
Revitalization
Globalization
Modernization
Abstract
This thesis focuses on the Márkomeannu festival’s contribution to the revitalization of food traditions. The study was conducted on the Márkomeannu festival in Skånland in Troms County, specifically in the Markasami areas in the rural hills of Skånland. The festival was chosen because it is an important arena for expression of indigeneity and culture. Many areas within the Sami community have suffered from assimilation and have afterwards gone through a process of revitalization. The process of revitalization of the culture, language, politics and history has been thoroughly studied and written about, but the revitalization of Sami traditional food has not been studied in detail. Food is an important cultural marker which works as building stones of each cultural foundation. Food can be both symbolic and be a purely practical necessity for a culture. The thesis establishes that some traditional dishes are adopted and adapted from international dishes. The results shows that traditional dishes are used to articulate the Sami culture, and that traditions can be adapted to a modern outlook, and also adapted to fit a Sami cultural profile. Márkomeannu as a cultural arena contributes to revitalization of food by creating a platform for cultural expression which can lead to a stronger Sami identity and a feeling of safety in expressing culture.
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Phylogenetic backgrounds and virulence profiles of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains from a case-control study using multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93223
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Jul;46(7):2280-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Afset Jan Egil
Anderssen Endre
Bruant Guillaume
Harel Josée
Wieler Lothar
Bergh KÃ¥re
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. jan.afset@ntnu.no
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Jul;46(7):2280-90
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Diarrhea - microbiology
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Escherichia coli Proteins - genetics
Fimbriae Proteins - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Microarray Analysis
Norway
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Shiga Toxins - genetics
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Atypical enteropathogenetic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains are frequently detected in children with diarrhea but are also a common finding in healthy children. The aim of this study was to compare the phylogenetic ancestry and virulence characteristics of atypical (eae positive, stx and bfpA negative) EPEC strains from Norwegian children with (n = 37) or without (n = 19) diarrhea and to search for an association between phylogenetic ancestry and diarrhea. The strains were classified in phylogenetic groups by phylogenetic marker genes and in sequence types (STs) by multilocus sequence typing. Phylogenetic ancestry was compared to virulence characteristics based on DNA microarray analysis. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were also performed. All four phylogenetic groups, 26 different STs, and 20 different clonal groups were represented among the 56 atypical EPEC strains. The strains were separated into three clusters by overall virulence gene profile; one large cluster with A, B1, and D strains and two clusters with group B2 strains. There was considerable heterogeneity in the PFGE profiles and serotypes, and almost half of the strains were O nontypeable. The efa1/lifA gene, previously shown to be statistically linked with diarrhea in this strain collection (J. E. Afset et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:3703-3711, 2006), was present in 8 of 26 STs. The two phylogenetic groups B1 and D were weakly associated with diarrhea (P = 0.06 and P = 0.09, respectively). In contrast, group B2 was isolated most frequently from healthy controls (P = 0.05). In conclusion, the atypical EPEC strains were heterogeneous both phylogenetically and by virulence profile. Phylogenetic ancestry was less useful as a predictor of diarrhea than were specific virulence genes.
PubMed ID
18463209 View in PubMed
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Effects of client and therapist ethnicity and ethnic matching: a prospective naturalistic study of outpatient mental health treatment in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95308
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(3):246-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Møllersen Snefrid
Sexton Harold C
Holte Arne
Author Affiliation
Hospital of Kirkenes, PO Box 410, N-9915 Kirkenes, Norway. Snefrid.Mollersen@helse-finnmark.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(3):246-55
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Catchment Area (Health)
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
We explored the effects of ethnicity on mental health treatment in the population of North Norway that largely consists of indigenous Sami and non-Sami Norwegians. As the two groups are comparable in their socio-economics, ethnic effects can be separated from their most common confounders. The effect of client and therapist ethnicity and client-therapist ethnic match on treatment was examined among psychiatric outpatients in this setting. Client (n=335) and therapist (n=33) demographics and ethnicity were recorded prior to intake. Self-reported psychosocial distress was recorded at intake, termination and 20-month follow-up. Therapists reported their clinical assessment, treatment delivery at intake and discharge. The results indicated that therapist ethnicity was associated with the amount and type of service provided but improvement was not. Both the delivery of treatment and improvement did not differ significantly by client ethnicity. Ethnic matching was associated with greater symptomatic improvement in treatments of moderate duration.
PubMed ID
19034726 View in PubMed
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National Centre of Rural Medicine in Norway: A bridge from rural practice to the academy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101098
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):948
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Author
Aaraas, IJ
Swensen, E
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Rural Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):948
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decentralized population
GP services
Medical academy
NCRM
Norway
Rural medical practice
Abstract
CONTEXT: Rural medical practice in Norway has an honourable 400 year history, but this has diminished since the end of World War II. Despite official intention to support a decentralised population, rural and remote populations have continuously reduced in Norway over the last 10 years. A consequence of the accompanying reduction in rural and remote GP services has been a distinct reduction in opportunities for medical student and intern placements. In 1999 the University of Tromso implemented some projects to stimulate rural medical practice, funded by the government. This culminated in the 2007 foundation of the Norwegian National Centre of Rural Medicine (NCRM) in Tromso.ISSUE: A key challenge of the NCRM is to identify factors that influence young doctors to choose rural careers. This is reflected in the three concurrent aims or perspectives of the NCRM: (1) to bridge the gap between the academy and rural medical practice (the principal perspective); (2) to promote research, education and networking among rural health professionals (the operational perspective); and (3) to contribute to the recruitment, stability and quality of rural health care (the political perspective).LESSONS LEARNED: The NCRM has had a number of achievements that include a publication that provides a narrative perspective on rural practice, the role of the rural doctor, and how rural culture and context influence proper clinical decision-making. Another achievement is a professional development and research program that has been successful in fostering a number of major studies, and led to the formation of a supportive PhD research group. The NCRM has also facilitated networking between rural practitioners and academics, at conferences and via its rural doctor website, and promoted cooperative international activities. In these ways the NCRM has fostered the transformation of rural doctors' experience into theory to enhance medical knowledge, begun to redress the balance between community- and hospital-based services, and so made a favourable start to building a bridge between rural practice and the medical academy in Norway.
PubMed ID
18557698 View in PubMed
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228 records – page 1 of 23.