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583 records – page 1 of 59.

Polymorphisms and mutations in GJB2 associated with hereditary hearing loss in east Greenlanders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102723
Source
Pages 189-190 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
among the Inuit populations in the Arctic is unknown and unexplored. Clinically, many Green landers show a mixed (conductive/sensorineural) hearing loss. We have therefore performed a selected cross-sectional pilot study in East Greenlanders by sequencing of the GJB2 gene in order to identify
  1 document  
Author
Homøe, P
Tranebjærg, L
Rendtorff, ND
Lodahl, M
Andersen, T
Andersen, S
Eiberg, H
Nielsen, I
Koch, A
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
Source
Pages 189-190 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Genetic
GJB2
Hearing loss
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 4. Genetics, Population Genetics and Birth Defects in the North.
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Lifestyle, reproductive factors and food intake in Greenlandic pregnant women: the ACCEPT - sub-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267862
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:29469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Lifestyle, reproductive factors and food intake in Greenlandic pregnant women: The ACCEPT � sub-study Ane-Kersti Skaarup Knudsen1, Manhai Long1, Henning S. Pedersen2 and Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Jørgensen1* 1Centre for Arctic Health & Unit of Cellular and Molecular
  1 document  
Author
Ane-Kersti Skaarup Knudsen
Manhai Long
Henning S Pedersen
Eva Cecilie Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:29469
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
File Size
677738
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology
Arctic Regions
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Eating
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Reproductive history
Residence Characteristics
Smoking/epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In the past decades, Greenland has changed from a hunter society to a more western lifestyle, causing less intake of traditional food, such as marine mammals, fish and seabirds. These changes in the living conditions and food habits might impact the maternal health in Greenland.
To describe lifestyle, reproductive factors and food intake in Greenlandic pregnant women, and to assess possible age and geographical differences.
Cross-sectional study of 189 Greenlandic pregnant women. Inclusion criteria were =18 years and lived >50% of their life in Greenland. Data were collected in 2010-2011, and information was obtained from lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires. Two age groups for comparison were given for the pregnant women (25.0 kg/m(2), 46.3% were current smokers in the beginning of their pregnancy and few participants consumed alcohol during pregnancy. Women 50% in North, South and West had a higher alcohol intake during pregnancy. Women in North had the fewest breastfeeding plans. Women in Disko Bay had the lowest intake of terrestrial species. No significant geographical differences were found for intake of marine mammals or seabirds.
The present study found relatively high BMI level and high smoking frequency in Greenlandic pregnant women. Age and region differences were found for alcohol consumption, breastfeeding plans and food intake profile. Further research is needed to implement relevant maternal health intervention programs in Greenland.
PubMed ID
26582354 View in PubMed
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Changing living conditions, life style and health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9025
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):442-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Curtis, T
Kvernmo, S
Bjerregaard, P
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. tc@si-folkesundhed.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):442-50
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental change
Greenland
Life Style
Living conditions
Abstract
Human health is the result of the interaction of genetic, nutritional, socio-cultural, economic, physical infrastructure and ecosystem factors. All of the individual, social, cultural and socioeconomic factors are influenced by the environment they are embedded in and by changes in this environment. The aim of the paper is to illustrate the influence of environmental change on living conditions and life style and some of the mechanisms through which such changes affect physical and mental health. The interrelationship between environmental and societal change is illustrated by an example from a small community in Greenland, where changing environmental conditions have influenced fishing and employment opportunities to the extent that the size of the population has changed dramatically. The link between social change and health is shown with reference to studies on education, housing and occupation as well as life style changes. The paper further illustrates the relationship between the rapid socio-cultural and economic change and the health of the population. Psychosocial stress is reflected in problems such as alcohol abuse, violence and suicide, and these factors have been shown in studies on migration and transitions in health to be connected to changes in lifestyle and living conditions.
PubMed ID
16440606 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and other drug use among students in Greenland--A comparison between some 1999 and 2003 ESPAD data

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9277
Source
Pages 410-413 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Alcohol and other drug use among students in Greenland - a comparison between some 1999 and 2003 ESPAD data Birger Poppel, Thomas Andersen Stali~tics Greenland, Nuuk, Greeenland ABSTRACT Objectives. Smoking and drinking habits among ymmg people are of great concern in Greenland. The
  1 document  
Author
Poppel, B
Andersen, T
Author Affiliation
Statistics Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 410-413 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Smoking - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Smoking and drinking habits among young people are of great concern in Greenland. The Home Rule government has through the Department of Prevention (PAARISA) carried out several campaigns to highlight the risks of smoking and drinking alcohol. To monitor the changes in these habits Greenland has participated in the European Survey Project on Alcohol and Drugs (ESPAD) in 1999 and 2003. The objective of this article is to make some preliminary comparisons between the 1999 and 2003 survey results on smoking and drinking alcohol. STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: The survey population in both the 1999 and 2003 surveys are all students in the 9th, 10th and 11th grade (persons between 14 and 16 years old). Hence the surveys include students born in 1982-84 and 1986-88, respectively. The ESPAD questionnaire focuses on alcohol and other drug use, but it also includes questions on lifestyle, relations to family and friends and the students' perception of their living conditions. Only answers from respondents born in 1983-84 and 1987-88 and only questions on smoking and drinking habits are analysed in this article. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: Smoking and alcohol drinking among students aged 14-16 years has been decreasing from 1999 to 2003 measured by use during the last 30 days. The same trends cannot be found in students' use of marijuana/hashish and sniffing different substances.
PubMed ID
15736695 View in PubMed
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Common mental disorders among patients in primary health care in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9278
Source
Pages 377-383 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Common mental disorders among patients in primary health care in Greenland Inge Lynge'", Pov/ Munk-Jorgensen '',Amalia Lynge Pedersen;. Gert Mulvad ',Peter Bjerregaard' 1 National lnstitute of Public Heal111, Copenhagen 2 Institute of Basic Psychiatric Research, Departn1cnt of Psychiatric
  1 document  
Author
Lynge, I
Munk-J�?�¸rgensen, P
Lynge Pedersen, A
Mulvad, G
Bjerregaard, P
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen. ingelynge@dadlnet.gk
Source
Pages 377-383 in J. Lepp�?�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Referral and Consultation
Risk factors
Two-phase study
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: There are many indications that mental health in Greenland is endangered and needs more attention. STUDY DESIGN: A two-stage study of the prevalence of common mental disorders among a sample of primary health care patients. METHODS: 376 randomly selected patients from general consultations in two Greenlandic towns were screened with 12 questions from the General Health Questionnaire. From these patients, a sample of 100 patients, including more high- than low-scorers, was interviewed using the SCAN (Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry) Present Examination psychiatric interview. RESULTS: Estimated prevalence for the total study population of at least one psychiatric diagnosis was 49.3% (95% CI 39.7-59.0%). Most diagnoses were in the group of anxieties, somatoform disorders and depressive disorders. Many patients had more than one diagnosis. Lack of education and poor proficiency in Danish, as well as growing up in a family with severe alcohol problems, were high risk factors for a psychiatric diagnosis. Patients and physicians seemingly agreed on focusing on physical disorders at the consultation, and only a minority of mental disorders was recognised and treated as such by the physicians. CONCLUSION: Mental disorders are prevalent but not sufficiently recognised and treated among patients in primary health care in Greenland. Their association with social and economic conditions calls for attention from the health services as well as from social and educational institutions.
PubMed ID
15736689 View in PubMed
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The importance of family to health, development and welfare of children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9279
Source
Pages 248-251 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
that children suffer \Vhen their parents have alcohol problen1s. The presen- tation is based on Danish research on the children of alcoholics as \Vell as on research on alcohol proble1ns in Greenlanders \Vith mental disorders. Anu1nber of fan1ilies in Greenland have prob- lems
  1 document  
Author
Christensen, E
Lynge, I
Author Affiliation
The Danish National Institute of Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark. ec@sfi.dk
Source
Pages 248-251 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Children at risk
Children of alcoholics
Family
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Recent investigations have shown that a number of families in Greenland have problems related to parents' use of alcohol. One of the consequences is that children get more difficult conditions during childhood. Children suffer when their parents have alcohol-related problems. An alcoholic parent is generally not able to meet the needs of his or her child. Many children are very lonely and do not discuss their thoughts, their situation or their problems with anyone. Some children get serious psychosocial problems as grown-ups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Professionals who work with children in health services, social services or within the school system are generally not adequately aware of the importance of family to the children's reactions. This means that the children are at risk of being treated only for symptoms when the unity of child and family is not adequately taken into account. Prevention has to focus on the first steps. Children must be allowed to talk about their problems. The whole family should be included in the treatment.
PubMed ID
15736661 View in PubMed
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[Tuberculosis survey in the medical distric of Angmagssalik, 1965]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44799
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 Feb 9;129(6):209-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1967

The measles epidemic in Greenland in 1962.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45187
Source
Arch Gesamte Virusforsch. 1965;16:53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965
Author
Bech, V.
Source
Arch Gesamte Virusforsch. 1965;16:53-6
Date
1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Epidemiology
Geriatrics
Greenland
Infant
Measles
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
PubMed ID
14322931 View in PubMed
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IPCC Workshop on Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275990
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-2010
. This also hampered the overall projections of global mean sea level rise in AR4. The future dynamical behaviour of the large polar ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland in a changing climate was identified as the primary origin of the large uncertainty in the AR4 projections of sea level rise for
  1 document  
Author
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
5526132
Keywords
Antarctica
Glaciers
Greenland
Ice caps
Ice sheets
Observations
Projections
Sea level
Abstract
Sea level rise is one of the major long-term consequences of human-induced climate change. Future projections of sea level changes and their regional expression are of crucial importance for the sustainability of coastal settlements around the world. The Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC (AR4) had comprehensively assessed key processes contributing topast, present and future sea level changes. However, process understanding was limited and thus both size and uncertainties associated with some of these contributions remained still largely unknown. This also hampered the overall projections of global mean sea level rise in AR4. The future dynamical behaviour of the large polar ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland in a changing climate was identified as the primary origin of the large uncertainty in the AR4projections of sea level rise for the 21st century.IPCC Working Group I (WGI) has acknowledged the relevance of this specific topic and thus (1) proposed a chapter on 'Sea Level Change' in its contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and (2) organized a targeted IPCC Workshop on 'Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities' very early in the assessment cycle for the IPCC's AR5. ThisWorkshop took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 21 to 24 June, 2010. The Workshop brought together experts from very diverse disciplines with a wide range of expertise, covering oceanography, ice sheet dynamics, glacier research and hydrology to discuss latest results from both observations and modelling relevant for sea level change. The workshop structure included a combination of plenary sessions with invited keynote presentations, group discussions, poster sessions and, finally, topical breakout groups.This Workshop Report contains a concise summary of the overall discussions and conclusions of the Workshop as well as summaries of the discussions in the breakout groups. It further includes the extended abstracts of the keynote presentations and poster abstracts presented during the Workshop.
Documents

SLW_WorkshopReport_kuala_lumpur.pdf

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Genetic determinants of glycated hemoglobin levels in the Greenlandic Inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290030
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 Jun; 26(6):868-875
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Emil V R Appel
Ida Moltke
Marit E Jørgensen
Peter Bjerregaard
Allan Linneberg
Oluf Pedersen
Anders Albrechtsen
Torben Hansen
Niels Grarup
Author Affiliation
The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Section for Metabolic Genetics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200, Copenhagen, Denmark. vincent@sund.ku.dk.
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 Jun; 26(6):868-875
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ankyrins
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Inuit
Genetics
Blood glucose
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Glycated Hemoglobin A
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Abstract
We previously showed that a common genetic variant leads to a remarkably increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the small and historically isolated Greenlandic population. Motivated by this, we aimed at discovering novel genetic determinants for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and at estimating the effect of known HbA1C-associated loci in the Greenlandic population. We analyzed genotype data from 4049 Greenlanders generated using the Illumina Cardio-Metabochip. We performed the discovery association analysis by an additive linear mixed model. To estimate the effect of known HbA1C-associated loci, we modeled the effect in the European and Inuit ancestry proportions of the Greenlandic genome (EAPGG and IAPGG, respectively). After correcting for multiple testing, we found no novel significant associations. When we investigated loci known to associate with HbA1C levels, we found that the lead variant in the GCK locus associated significantly with HbA1C levels in the IAPGG ([Formula: see text]). Furthermore, for 10 of 15 known HbA1C loci, the effects in IAPGG were similar to the previously reported effects. Interestingly, the ANK1 locus showed a statistically significant ancestral population differential effect, with opposing directions of effect in the two ancestral populations. In conclusion, we found only 1 of the 15 known HbA1C loci to be significantly associated with HbA1C levels in the IAPGG and that two-thirds of the loci showed similar effects in Inuit as previously found in European and East Asian populations. Our results shed light on the genetic effects across ethnicities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29483669 View in PubMed
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583 records – page 1 of 59.