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557 records – page 1 of 56.

Polymorphisms and mutations in GJB2 associated with hereditary hearing loss in east Greenlanders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102723
Source
Pages 189-190 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
among the Inuit populations in the Arctic is unknown and unexplored. Clinically, many Green landers show a mixed (conductive/sensorineural) hearing loss. We have therefore performed a selected cross-sectional pilot study in East Greenlanders by sequencing of the GJB2 gene in order to identify
  1 document  
Author
Homøe, P
Tranebjærg, L
Rendtorff, ND
Lodahl, M
Andersen, T
Andersen, S
Eiberg, H
Nielsen, I
Koch, A
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
Source
Pages 189-190 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Genetic
GJB2
Hearing loss
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 4. Genetics, Population Genetics and Birth Defects in the North.
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Communication about health and the risk effect of eating traditional food

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2873
Source
Pages 222-224 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Communication about Health and the Risk Effect of Eating Traditional Food Gert Mulvad and Henning Sloth Pedersen Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland Abstract: Like other populations, the Arctic population has to deal with the fact that specialized informa- tion made available to
  1 document  
Author
Mulvad, G.
Pedersen, H.S.
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 222-224 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Atherosclerosis
Communication
Contaminants
Greenland
Inuit
Traditional foods
Abstract
Like other populations, the Arctic population has to deal with the fact that specialized information made available to them through environmental and medical research is often difficult to grasp. Not only are the data complicated, they are also often misconstrued through media distortion. Communication is more than just information. Experience with communication gained during a 1990s international autopsy study in Greenland will be presented. The study looked at the possible protective effect against atherosclerosis due to the special fatty acid composition in the traditional food and also the effect of exposure of the local people to heavy metal and organochlorine. "When I eat traditional food, I know who I am" (Inuk).
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Respiratory tract infections in Greenlandic children: a prospective cohort study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2879
Source
Pages 252-254 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Respiratory Tract Infections in Greenlandic Children: A Prospective Cohort Study Anders Koch1, Kare Mjijlbak1, Preben Homjije2, Poul Bretlau2, and Mads Melbye1 1 Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark 2 Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck
  1 document  
Author
Koch, A.
Molbak, K.
Homoe, P.
Bretlau, P.
Melbye, M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 252-254 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Child health status
Greenland
Respiratory tract infections
Sisimiut
Surveys
Abstract
Respiratory tract infections in children, measured in terms of both morbidity and mortality, represent a major health problem in Greenland. In particular, otitis media is highly prevalent, and is characterized by early onset and a high degree of chronicity. There is, however, little knowledge about the epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in Greenland. In the spring of 1996, a prospective study of such infections in infants and children was initiated in Sisimiut, West Greenland. The main objectives of the study are to describe the epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in children under four years of age, to estimate the impact of these diseases on short- and long-term morbidity, and to identify risk factors for transmission and clinical severity. An open cohort of children in Sisimiut will be formed, including all resident children below three years of age at the beginning of the study, as well as all children born in the following two-year period: in total approximately 600 children. During two years, these children will be followed closely, including registration of episodes of respiratory tract infections. Furthermore, growth will be measured and microbiological samples obtained.
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Regional variation in cardiovascular risk factors and ischemic heart disease mortality in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2890
Source
Pages 302-305 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Regional Variation in Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality in Greenland Peter Bjerregaard1, Gert Mulvad2, and Henning Sloth Pedersen3 1 Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark Primary Health Clinic, Nuuk
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard. P.
Mulvad, G.
Pedersen, H.S.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 302-305 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cardiovascular disease
Diet
Greenland
Indigenous peoples
Risk factors
Traditional foods
Abstract
In a random sample of 264 indigenous Greenlanders, behavioral and biochemical risk factors for cardiovascular disease were compared between the capital, Nuuk, and the rest of the country ("the Coast") while the whole sample was compared with Denmark. In Nuuk consumption of marine food averaged 23 meals per month, compared with 38 on the Coast. N6/N3 ratio was higher in Nuuk but HDL concentrations were similar. There were fewer current smokers in Nuuk, but the prevalence of hypertension and mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD) were similar. IHD mortality is lower in Greenland than in Denmark (352 and 434 per 100,000). This is in agreement with the dietary differences, and with the low N6/N3 ratio and the high HDL concentration in Greenland, but opposed to a high proportion of smokers and a high prevalence of hypertension in Greenland compared with Denmark. IHD mortality is apparently decreasing in Greenland concurrently with a Westernization of the lifestyle. This paradox may be due to the fact that societal changes are recent, and the situation may change in the future.
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Effects of dietary seal oil on fat metabolism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2895
Source
Pages 322-324 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
2 Queen Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland 3 Section for Research in Greenland, Danish Institute of Clinical Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: In the 1970s, Bang and Dyerberg demonstrated that a high intake of n-3 acids in Greenland protected against ischemic heart disease. This
  1 document  
Author
M�¸ller, S.M.
Hansen, J.C.
Thorling, E.B.
Mulvad, G.
Pedersen, H.S.
Bjerregaard, P.
Author Affiliation
Center of Arctic Environmental Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark
Source
Pages 322-324 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Atherosclerosis
Diet
Fatty acids
Fish oil
Greenland
Abstract
In the 1970s, Bang and Dyerberg demonstrated that a high intake of n-3 acids in Greenland protected against ischemic heart disease. This started the interest in fish oil as a preventive component in cardiac disease. The fatty acid composition in Greenlandic diet is quite different from the one in the Danish diet, being lower in saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and higher in monounsatured fatty acids (MUFAs). During the last decade, evidence has suggested that the MUFA (18:1) is not a neutral dietary component but has a positive effect of its own. This paper reports on a current project undertaken to study the effect of marine MUFAs and PUFAs on atherosclerosis-related parameters and to evaluate their possible synergistic effect in the prevention of atherosclerosis. The project has recently started, so at the moment results cannot be presented. The study will be carried out as an intervention study on 50 healthy volunteers. Capsules of Greenlandic halibut oil (rich in MUFAs) and "Biomarin" (rich in n-3 PUFAs) will be tested against seal oil.
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Social and cultural factors as determinants of self-rated health in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2918
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Social and Cultural Factors as Determinants of Self-Rated Health in Greenland Peter Bjerregaard1 and Tine Curtis2 1 Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark Greenland Home Rule, Department of Health, Environment and Research, Nuuk
  1 document  
Author
Bjerregaard, P.
Curtis, T.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 622-625 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Health status surveys
Indigenous peoples
Sociocultural classification
Survey methodology
Abstract
In 1993-94, a countrywide health interview survey was performed in 38 towns and villages throughout Greenland. Information was collected on self-rated health and self-reported disease, social and cultural factors, lifestyle, and living conditions. A total of 1,580 adult Greenlanders and 148 Danes was interviewed (57% of the sample). Respondents were classified according to ethnic self-identification and job category, but these customary classifications were not satisfactory. An alternative classification according to exposure to traditional Greenlandic hunting culture and Danish culture during childhood was tested. The population fell into three subgroups, each with its own socioeconomic, ethnic, and occupational pattern, and with different health and health behavior. The new classification has distinct advantages as a supplement to the usual classification according to ethnicity and job category. The aim of the present paper is to present a comprehensive health interview survey from Greenland andto discuss some considerations regarding sociocultural classification of the population.
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The role of hunting in a socioeconomic classification for Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2919
Source
Pages 626-629 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
The Role of Hunting in a Socioeconomic Classification for Greenland Karo Thomsen, Tine Curtis, and Peter Bjerregaard Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The socioeconomic classification used in Western societies is
  1 document  
Author
Thomsen, K.
Curtis, T.
Bjerregaard, P.
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 626-629 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Greenland Health Interview Survey
Hunting
Indigenous peoples
Occupational classification
Survey methodology
Abstract
The socioeconomic classification used in Western societies is not directly applicable to Greenland where other factors, such as success as a hunter, participation in community life, and raising children, also convey status and must be included in a status coding. In the 1993 Greenland Health Interview Survey the participants' hunting activities were estimated through a number of questions. Nineteen percent of male Greenlanders classified themselves as hunters when asked about their primary occupation, but in another question an additional 10% stated that they relied on hunting for a living. When asked about their job, hunters were confused as to whether hunting was considered a job by the researchers. This uncertainty may explain the difference between the two questions regarding classification of individuals as hunters. For future research it is necessary to develop a socioeconomic status classification which is culturally sensitive and suited to contemporary Greenlandic society.
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Well-being among Greenlandic students

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2922
Source
Pages 639-642 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Well-Being among Greenlandic Students J. Michael Pedersen HBSC-Greenland, WHO Cross-National Survey, Frederikssund, Denmark Abstract: Purpose: To describe and gain more knowledge of self-perceived health status and behavior among schoolchildren in Greenland, in order to provide a basis for
  1 document  
Author
Pedersen, J.M.
Author Affiliation
HBSC-Greenland, WHO Cross-National Survey, Frederikssund, Denmark
Source
Pages 639-642 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent health
Child health
Greenland
Health awareness surveys
Health Behavior in School-Aged Children Survey
Health risks
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe and gain more knowledge of self-perceived health status and behavior among schoolchildren in Greenland, in order to provide a basis for future actions in health promotion. METHOD: Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to students through their schools. Students aged 11 to 17 years in public school were included. The survey covered most of Greenland, and approximately 4,700 students participated. RESULTS: The results focus on three age groups: 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds. The number of students in each age group were: 11 years: 542, 13 years: 548, and 15 years: 413. Perceived health: 56% of the 11-year-olds felt "very healthy", as did 36% of the 13-year-olds and 25% of the 15-year-olds, with no significant differences by gender. The child who feels healthy is more likely to be a happy child, is more likely to feel self-confident, and is less likely to feel lonely. Feeling healthy is also strongly associated with avoiding health risks like smoking, drinking alcohol, and using drugs. CONCLUSION: Feeling healthy was strongly associated with avoiding health risks. Therefore, it is important to encourage good health and build up young peoples' self-confidence.
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Quality development in health care in Greenland: facing unlikely odds

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2928
Source
Pages 668-670 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Quality Development in Health Care in Greenland: Facing Unlikely Odds Richard E. Steele Medical Advisor, Greenland Home Rule Government, Department of Health Research and Environment, Nuuk, Greenland Abstract: Health care in Greenland is historically founded on a fully tax-based system
  1 document  
Author
Steele, R.E.
Author Affiliation
Greenland Home Rule Government, Department of Health Research and Environment, Nuuk
Source
Pages 668-670 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Health care delivery
Health care information
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
Health care in Greenland is historically founded on a fully tax-based system financed in large part by the Danish state. Administratively, the system was until 1992 under the Danish health authorities, with a concomitant lack of clarity concerning lines of communication in quality issues. Because of the enormous distance and communications problems, the individual districts were and continue to be run with a great deal of autonomy; and to this time the level of centralized data sources concerning qualitative aspects of the health care sector are extremely sparse. An attempt is being made to introduce a state-of-the-art centralized data collection and analysis function, with all that that entails in terms of system and personnel development. This system is described as a project, using an analysis of the official waiting-list database as a case study. The establishment and administration of the system is described. A cross-sectional analysis of the database is presented, illustrating issues of validity and reliability, as well as specifying the areas of system and personnel development necessary to make this system functional. The author's perception of the generalized implications of the lessons learned to date is presented.
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The recruiting of staff for the health system in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2931
Source
Pages 679-681 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
The Recruiting of Staff for the Health System in Greenland Gert Mulvad Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland Abstract: Challenges in health service delivery in circumpolar countries include rapid turnover of pro- fessional personnel, maintaining quality care, and development of
  1 document  
Author
Mulvad, G.
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 679-681 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Health care workers
Recruitment
Abstract
Challenges in health service delivery in circumpolar countries include rapid turnover of professional personnel, maintaining quality care, and development of appropriate structure of the health care system. Recruitment and retention of personnel dedicated to indigenous health care and work in small communities is an ongoing issue. Strategies such as decentralized education, student programs, financial incentives, cross-cultural training, consultant networks, and community initiatives have all been applied to varying degrees. As the problem is similar across circumpolar countries, this roundtable will be an opportunity to explore new incentives and approaches to recruitment and retention from several countries.
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557 records – page 1 of 56.