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2323 records – page 1 of 233.

Food-borne botulism in Canada, 1971-84.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1061
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1985 Dec 1; 133(11):1141-1146.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Hauschild, A.H.
Gauvreau, L.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1985 Dec 1; 133(11):1141-1146.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Clostridium botulinum
Diet, traditional
Immunizations
Antitoxin
Animals
Botulism - epidemiology
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Microbiology
Food Preservation
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Meat
Reindeer
Risk
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Sixty-one outbreaks of food-borne botulism involving a total of 122 cases, of which 21 were fatal, were recorded from 1971 to 1984 in Canada. Most occurred in northern Quebec, the Northwest Territories or British Columbia. Of the 122 victims 113 were native people, mostly Inuit. Most of the outbreaks (59%) were caused by raw, parboiled or "fermented" meats from marine mammals; fermented salmon eggs or fish accounted for 23% of the outbreaks. Three outbreaks were attributed to home-preserved foods, and one outbreak was attributed to a commercial product. The causative Clostridium botulinum type was determined in 58 of the outbreaks: the predominant type was E (in 52 outbreaks), followed by B (in 4) and A (in 2). Renewed educational efforts combined with a comprehensive immunization program would significantly improve the control of botulism in high-risk populations.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1843.
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Changing picture of neoplastic disease in the western and central Canadian Arctic (1950-1980).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1122
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1984 Jan 1; 130(1):25-32.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
Hildes, J.A.
Schaefer, O.
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1984 Jan 1; 130(1):25-32.
Date
1984
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the cervix
Carcinoma of the lymph glands
Diet, general
Adult
Arctic Regions
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Data on 239 verified cases of malignant disease diagnosed from January 1950 through December 1980 in 104 male and 135 female Inuit from the western and central Canadian Arctic were reviewed. Tumours of the salivary glands, kidney and nasopharynx were the most frequent between 1950 and 1966, but their frequency declined thereafter. The most frequent tumours in the most recent period studied were lung, cervical and colorectal cancers. Breast cancer was absent before 1966 and was found in only 2 of 107 Canadian Inuit women stricken with cancer from 1967 to 1980, whereas the recent rates in the longer-acculturated Inuit of Alaska and Greenland have approached those prevailing in modern Western women. The Inuit appeared to be more prone than other North Americans to cancer of the esophagus, liver and ampulla of Vater but less prone to cancer of the skin, prostate, pancreas and stomach. The gradual reduction in the relative frequency of tumours typical for traditional Inuit and their replacement by "modern" tumours appear to reflect the history of local acculturation. Various factors in the environment, nutritional habits and lifestyle may contribute to the unusual and changing epidemiologic patterns of cancer in Canadian Inuit.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2154.
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Health promotion survey in the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1215
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 79(Supplement 1):16-20.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
Imrie, R.
Warren, R.
Author Affiliation
Northwest Territories Government, Department of Health
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 79(Supplement 1):16-20.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Attitudes
Alcohol abuse
Drug abuse
Fitness
Tobacco use
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1402.
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Human botulism in Canada (1919-1973).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature671
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1974 Jan 19; 110(2):191-200.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Dolman, C.E.
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1974 Jan 19; 110(2):191-200.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Epidemics
Clostridium botulinum
Botulism, type A
Botulism, type B
Botulism, type E
Diet, traditional
Antitoxin
Animals
Botulinum Antitoxin - therapeutic use
Botulism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Canada
Female
Fish Products
Food Habits
Food Microbiology
Food poisoning
Food Preservation
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Meat
Pinnipedia
Salmonidae
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1838.
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Source
Canadian Nurse. 80(1):30-31.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Source
Canadian Nurse. 80(1):30-31.
Date
1984
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Tuktoyaktuk
Eskimo Point
Pangnirtung
Nurses
Nursing stations
Health services
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Socio-economic correlates of mortality and morbidity among Inuit infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1144
Source
Pages 452-461 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Circumpolar Health. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 3rd, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
/Other NWl' Total Rate for 'ear No. Rate No. Rate No. Rate No. Rate Canada .970 14 53.l 60 105.0 10 21. 7 84 64.7 .969 6 24.2 50 90.5 8 20.5 64 53.7 19.3 (2) .968 14 54.9 51 89 .1 12 27.4 77 60.9 20.8 .967 11 45.1 46 83.8 10 29.6 67 59.3 22.0 966 11 46.2 58 108.8 16 52.4 86 79.9 23.1 .965
  1 document  
Author
Hobart, C.W.
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 452-461 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Circumpolar Health. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 3rd, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Alcohol abuse
Cambridge Bay
Coppermine
Frobisher Bay
Gjoa Haven
Hall Beach
Holman
Housing
Igloolik
Infant feeding
Infant morbidity
Infant mortality
Inuvik
Pelly Bay
Pond Inlet
Poverty
Spence Bay
Tuktoyaktuk
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1420.
Documents
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Changing patterns of neoplastic disease in Canadian Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2205
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 112:1399-1404.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
Schaefer, O.
Author Affiliation
Northern Medical Research Laboratory (Edmonton)
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 112:1399-1404.
Date
1975
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cancer
Carcinoma of the salivary gland
Carcinoma of the kidney
Carcinoma of the lung
Carcinoma of the cervix
Carcinoma of the breast
NPC
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Otitis media and bottle-feeding. An epidemiological study of infant feeding habits and incidence of recurrent and chronic middle ear disease in Canadian Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2226
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 62:478-489.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
Schaefer, O.
Author Affiliation
Northern Medical Research Laboratory (Edmonton)
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 62:478-489.
Date
1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Otitis media
Infant feeding
Nutrition
Acculturation
Tuberculosis
Health services
Bottle-feeding
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2449.
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Source
University of Toronto Medical Journal. 45:151-154.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
Garfield, H.A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
University of Toronto Medical Journal. 45:151-154.
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Frobisher Bay
Inuvik
Tuktoyaktuk
Coppermine
Cambridge Bay
Health services
Hospitals
Nursing stations
Health station
C.D. Howe (ship)
Health status
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1499.
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Northern infant syndrome: a deficiency state?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature942
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 131:199-204.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
Godel, J.C.
Hart, A.G.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 131:199-204.
Date
1984
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Tuktoyaktuk
Aklavik
Frobisher Bay
Hepatitis, general
Hemolytic anemia
Rickets
Malnutrition
Northern infant syndrome
Vitamin D
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Vitamin E
Diet, general
von Jaksch-Luzet syndrome
Anemia, Hemolytic - complications
Arctic Regions
Avitaminosis - therapy
Canada
Diarrhea - complications
Failure to Thrive - complications
Female
Hepatitis - complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - complications
Rickets - complications
Syndrome
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
A syndrome is described that affected 16 Indian and Inuit infants roughly 3 months old, most of whom were born in settlements in the Canadian Arctic. The infants presented with a clinical picture that included hepatitis, hemolytic anemia, rickets and respiratory distress, a combination that resembled a syndrome first described in malnourished infants at the turn of the century by von Jaksch and Luzet. The clinical course was self-limited, and all the infants survived without sequelae. The cause of the syndrome was not determined; no infectious agents were discovered. However, low levels of vitamins A, C, D and E were found in a few infants in whom assays were done. The implications of these findings and their relation to the possible cause of this "northern infant syndrome" are discussed.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2696.
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2323 records – page 1 of 233.