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Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among Inuit pregnant women: Validity of alcohol ascertainment measures over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292590
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Nov; 64:73-78
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Marilyn Fortin
Gina Muckle
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Richard E Bélanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: marilyn.fortin@douglas.mcgill.ca.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Nov; 64:73-78
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed by women are two important indicators of the risks associated with drinking during pregnancy. Some studies have compared the validity of maternal alcohol report obtained during and after pregnancy. However, to date none have examined alcohol use in a Native Canadian population, such as the Inuit. Effective measurement methods are necessary to better understand why children from some communities seem at increased risk of alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders.
Prospective and retrospective drinking interviews were obtained from a sub-sample of 67 women included in the Nunavik Child Development Study (NCDS), Nunavik, Canada (1995-2010; N=248). Number of days of alcohol consumption and binge drinking (five drinks or more per episode) across pregnancy as well as ounces of absolute alcohol per day and per drinking day among users were collected using timeline follow-back interviews administered both during pregnancy and again 11years after delivery. Consistency of alcohol reports over time, as well as significant differences for alcohol quantities described by users between interviews were examined. Sociodemographic characteristics associated with alcohol use reports were also assessed.
The proportion of positive reports of alcohol and binge drinking during pregnancy was higher when women were interviewed prospectively during pregnancy than retrospectively. We observed a fair to moderate agreement of alcohol report between interview periods. By contrast, the number of binge drinking days during pregnancy was slightly higher among alcohol users when documented retrospectively.
Our findings endorse the conclusion that prospective alcohol measures provide more reliable ascertainment and likely generate more valid information about the proportion of children prenatally exposed to alcohol in the Inuit population.
PubMed ID
29079497 View in PubMed
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Assessing PTSD in the military: Validation of a scale distributed to Danish soldiers after deployment since 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290879
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2017 Jun; 58(3):260-268
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Karen-Inge Karstoft
Søren B Andersen
Anni B S Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Research and Knowledge Centre, the Danish Veteran Centre, Ringsted, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2017 Jun; 58(3):260-268
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Mental health
Military Personnel - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Reproducibility of Results
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Since 1998, soldiers deployed to war zones with the Danish Defense (˜31,000) have been invited to fill out a questionnaire on post-mission reactions. This provides a unique data source for studying the psychological toll of war. Here, we validate a measure of PTSD-symptoms from the questionnaire. Soldiers from two cohorts deployed to Afghanistan with the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in 2009 (ISAF7, N = 334) and 2013 (ISAF15, N = 278) filled out a standard questionnaire (Psychological Reactions following International Missions, PRIM) concerning a range of post-deployment reactions including symptoms of PTSD (PRIM-PTSD). They also filled out a validated measure of PTSD-symptoms in DSM-IV, the PTSD-checklist (PCL). We tested reliability of PRIM-PTSD by estimating Cronbach's alpha, and tested validity by correlating items, clusters, and overall scale with corresponding items in the PCL. Furthermore, we conducted two confirmatory factor analytic models to test the factor structure of PRIM-PTSD, and tested measurement invariance of the selected model. Finally, we established a screening and a clinical cutoff score by application of ROC analysis. We found high internal consistency of the PRIM-PTSD (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88; both cohorts), strong item-item (0.48-0.83), item-cluster (0.43-0.72), cluster-cluster (0.71-0.82) and full-scale (0.86-0.88) correlations between PRIM-PTSD and PCL. The factor analyses showed adequate fit of a one-factor model, which was also found to display strong measurement invariance across cohorts. ROC curve analysis established cutoff scores for screening (sensitivity = 1, specificity = 0.93) and clinical use (sensitivity = 0.71, specificity = 0.98). In conclusion, we find that PRIM-PTSD is a valid measure for assessing PTSD-symptoms in Danish soldiers following deployment.
PubMed ID
28419465 View in PubMed
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Assessing the dimensionality of YFHS-Swe: a questionnaire to assess youth-friendliness in differentiated health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295034
Source
Glob Health Action. 2017; 10(1):1380399
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
2017
Author
Mazen Baroudi
Anna-Karin Waenerlund
Miguel San Sebastian
Isabel Goicolea
Author Affiliation
a Unit of Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2017; 10(1):1380399
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adult
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychology, Adolescent
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the dimensionality of YFHS-Swe and identify possible unique factors in the evaluation of youth-friendliness. YFHS-Swe was answered by 1110 youths aged 16 to 25 years visiting youth clinics in Northern Sweden. Thirteen factors were identified by exploratory factor analysis and except for one factor they all proved to fit well and have good reliability when assessed by the confirmatory factor analysis. The YFHS-Swe proved to be credible and suitable for assessing youth-friendliness of differentiated health services in Sweden. With cultural and linguistic adaptations, it can be used in similar settings internationally.
Notes
Cites: Psychometrika. 1965 Jun;30:179-85 PMID 14306381
Cites: Lancet. 2007 May 5;369(9572):1565-73 PMID 17482988
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2012 Nov;51(5):422-30 PMID 23084162
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2006;938:151-204; discussion 317-41 PMID 16921920
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):42-71 PMID 23238401
Cites: Reprod Health. 2016 Dec 21;13(1):147 PMID 28003025
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jun;45(4):366-372 PMID 28385109
Cites: Med Care. 2006 Nov;44(11 Suppl 3):S50-9 PMID 17060836
PubMed ID
29043946 View in PubMed
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Assessment of health literacy among older Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299832
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Johanna Eronen
Leena Paakkari
Erja Portegijs
Milla Saajanaho
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaskyla, Finland. johanna.eronen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Focus Groups
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the feasibility of the HLS-EU-Q16 (in Finnish) for use among older Finns and whether the health literacy score correlates with indicators of health and functioning.
To determine the feasibility of the instrument, we first conducted a focus group discussion with nine participants. For the quantitative analyses, we used data from the AGNES cohort study, collected between October 2017 and April 2018 at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. 292 75-year-old Finnish men and women were interviewed face-to-face in their homes. Health literacy was measured with the HLS-EU-Q16 and health literacy score, ranging from 0 to 50, computed. The reproducibility of the instrument was test-retested. Chi-square tests were used to compare health literacy scores between participants by different socioeconomic variables, and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to study the associations of health literacy with cognition, depressive symptoms, chronic conditions, life-space mobility and physical performance.
The mean health literacy score for all participants was 35.05 (SD 6.32). Participants who rated their financial situation and self-rated health as very good had the highest health literacy scores (38.85, SD 5.09 and 39.22, SD 6.77, respectively). Better health literacy was associated with better cognitive status, fewer depressive symptoms and chronic conditions, higher life-space mobility and better physical performance.
The HLS-EU-Q16 is a feasible measure for research purposes among older Finns. The associations between health literacy and indicators of health and functioning need to be more closely investigated in larger samples with a wider age-range.
PubMed ID
30578457 View in PubMed
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Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
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Building and validating a prediction model for paediatric type 1 diabetes risk using next generation targeted sequencing of class II HLA genes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292615
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2017 Nov; 33(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Lue Ping Zhao
Annelie Carlsson
Helena Elding Larsson
Gun Forsander
Sten A Ivarsson
Ingrid Kockum
Johnny Ludvigsson
Claude Marcus
Martina Persson
Ulf Samuelsson
Eva Örtqvist
Chul-Woo Pyo
Hamid Bolouri
Michael Zhao
Wyatt C Nelson
Daniel E Geraghty
Åke Lernmark
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2017 Nov; 33(8):
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Alleles
Autoantibodies
Case-Control Studies
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics - immunology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
It is of interest to predict possible lifetime risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in young children for recruiting high-risk subjects into longitudinal studies of effective prevention strategies.
Utilizing a case-control study in Sweden, we applied a recently developed next generation targeted sequencing technology to genotype class II genes and applied an object-oriented regression to build and validate a prediction model for T1D.
In the training set, estimated risk scores were significantly different between patients and controls (P = 8.12 × 10-92 ), and the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was 0.917. Using the validation data set, we validated the result with AUC of 0.886. Combining both training and validation data resulted in a predictive model with AUC of 0.903. Further, we performed a "biological validation" by correlating risk scores with 6 islet autoantibodies, and found that the risk score was significantly correlated with IA-2A (Z-score = 3.628, P 
Notes
ErratumIn: Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2018 Feb;34(2): PMID 29446259
PubMed ID
28755385 View in PubMed
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Building the foundation for veterinary register-based epidemiology: A systematic approach to data quality assessment and validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297882
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2018 12; 65(8):936-946
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
12-2018
Author
Anna Camilla Birkegård
Mette Ely Fertner
Vibeke Frøkjaer Jensen
Anette Boklund
Nils Toft
Tariq Halasa
Ana Carolina Lopes Antunes
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2018 12; 65(8):936-946
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Animals
Data Accuracy
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods - veterinary
Farms
Humans
Registries
Research Design
Swine
Veterinary Medicine - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Epidemiological studies often use data from registers. Data quality is of vital importance for the quality of the research. The aim of this study was to suggest a structured workflow to assess the quality of veterinary national registers. As an example of how to use the workflow, the quality of the following three registers was assessed: the Central Husbandry Register (CHR), the database for movement of pigs (DMP) and the national Danish register of drugs for veterinary use (VetStat). A systematic quantitative assessment was performed, with calculation the proportion of farms and observations with "poor quality" of data. "Poor" quality was defined for each measure (variable) either as a mismatch between and/or within registers, registrations of numbers outside the expected range, or unbalanced in- and outgoing movements. Interviews were conducted to make a complementary qualitative assessment. The proportion of farms and observations within each quality measure varied. This study highlights the importance of systematic quality assessment of register data and suggests a systematic approach for such assessments and validations without the use of primary data.
PubMed ID
30105809 View in PubMed
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Constructing content validity of clinical nurse specialist core competencies: exploratory sequential mixed-method study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299343
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Dec; 32(4):1428-1436
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Krista Jokiniemi
Riitta Meretoja
Anna-Maija Pietilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Dec; 32(4):1428-1436
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Female
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Clinicians - standards
Nurse Specialists - standards
Nurse's Role
United States
Abstract
The demand to increase nursing competence is brought on by the requirement of safe, accessible and more effective use of healthcare provider expertise. Clinical nurse specialist competency development dates back to the late 20th century; however, an examination of the literature reveals a lack of research and discussion to support the competency development.
To describe the formulation and validation process of the clinical nurse specialist core competencies.
Exploratory sequential mixed-method design.
This mixed-method study, conducted between 2013 and 2017 in Finland, involved four phases: I) a Policy Delphi study (n = 25, n = 22, n = 19); II) cross-mapping of preliminary competency criteria against international competency sets; III) content validity study of expanded competency criteria (n = 7, n = 10); and IV) verification of competency criteria with practicing CNSs (n = 16). Data were analysed by both qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.
Seventy-four preliminary clinical nurse competency criteria were formulated in the first phase of the study. Through cross-mapping the competencies against the US and Canadian clinical nurse specialist competency sets, they were further concised to 61 criteria. The examination of Content Validity Indexes and experts' comments led to the clarification and consequent inclusion of 50 criteria to the final scale, with Scale Content Validity Index Average of 0.94. The competency criteria were evaluated to be a solid set with potential to clarify and uniform the clinical nurse specialist roles.
Through a rigorous research process, validated clinical nurse specialist competency criteria were formed with a high Scale Content Validity Index Average. The results allude to the potential of formulating international competency criteria to support global role clarity and understanding. However, further research is needed to validate the content and construct of the formulated competencies with a larger population across countries.
PubMed ID
29963720 View in PubMed
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Construction of a web-based questionnaire for longitudinal investigation of work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and performance impairments in high-performance marine craft populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291592
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 20; 7(7):e016006
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Jul-20-2017
Author
Riccardo Lo Martire
Manudul Pahansen de Alwis
Björn Olov Äng
Karl Garme
Author Affiliation
Centre for Naval Architecture, Department of Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 20; 7(7):e016006
Date
Jul-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Fatigue - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Internet
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Musculoskeletal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Reproducibility of Results
Ships
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Work Performance
Abstract
High-performance marine craft personnel (HPMCP) are regularly exposed to vibration and repeated shock (VRS) levels exceeding maximum limitations stated by international legislation. Whereas such exposure reportedly is detrimental to health and performance, the epidemiological data necessary to link these adverse effects causally to VRS are not available in the scientific literature, and no suitable tools for acquiring such data exist. This study therefore constructed a questionnaire for longitudinal investigations in HPMCP.
A consensus panel defined content domains, identified relevant items and outlined a questionnaire. The relevance and simplicity of the questionnaire's content were then systematically assessed by expert raters in three consecutive stages, each followed by revisions. An item-level content validity index (I-CVI) was computed as the proportion of experts rating an item as relevant and simple, and a scale-level content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) as the average I-CVI across items. The thresholds for acceptable content validity were 0.78 and 0.90, respectively. Finally, a dynamic web version of the questionnaire was constructed and pilot tested over a 1-month period during a marine exercise in a study population sample of eight subjects, while accelerometers simultaneously quantified VRS exposure.
Content domains were defined as work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and human performance, and items were selected to reflect these constructs. Ratings from nine experts yielded S-CVI/Ave of 0.97 and 1.00 for relevance and simplicity, respectively, and the pilot test suggested that responses were sensitive to change in acceleration and that the questionnaire, following some adjustments, was feasible for its intended purpose.
A dynamic web-based questionnaire for longitudinal survey of key variables in HPMCP was constructed. Expert ratings supported that the questionnaire content is relevant, simple and sufficiently comprehensive, and the pilot test suggested that the questionnaire is feasible for longitudinal measurements in the study population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28729320 View in PubMed
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88 records – page 1 of 9.