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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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A2ML1 and otitis media: novel variants, differential expression, and relevant pathways.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310601
Source
Hum Mutat. 2019 08; 40(8):1156-1171
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
08-2019
Author
Eric D Larson
Jose Pedrito M Magno
Matthew J Steritz
Erasmo Gonzalo D V Llanes
Jonathan Cardwell
Melquiadesa Pedro
Tori Bootpetch Roberts
Elisabet Einarsdottir
Rose Anne Q Rosanes
Christopher Greenlee
Rachel Ann P Santos
Ayesha Yousaf
Sven-Olrik Streubel
Aileen Trinidad R Santos
Amanda G Ruiz
Sheryl Mae Lagrana-Villagracia
Dylan Ray
Talitha Karisse L Yarza
Melissa A Scholes
Catherine B Anderson
Anushree Acharya
Samuel P Gubbels
Michael J Bamshad
Stephen P Cass
Nanette R Lee
Rehan S Shaikh
Deborah A Nickerson
Karen L Mohlke
Jeremy D Prager
Teresa Luisa G Cruz
Patricia J Yoon
Generoso T Abes
David A Schwartz
Abner L Chan
Todd M Wine
Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz
Norman Friedman
Katerina Kechris
Juha Kere
Suzanne M Leal
Ivana V Yang
Janak A Patel
Ma Leah C Tantoco
Saima Riazuddin
Kenny H Chan
Petri S Mattila
Maria Rina T Reyes-Quintos
Zubair M Ahmed
Herman A Jenkins
Tasnee Chonmaitree
Lena Hafrén
Charlotte M Chiong
Regie Lyn P Santos-Cortez
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.
Source
Hum Mutat. 2019 08; 40(8):1156-1171
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Down-Regulation
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Profiling - methods
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Otitis Media - genetics
Pakistan
Pedigree
Philippines
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Signal Transduction
United States
Young Adult
alpha-Macroglobulins - genetics
Abstract
A genetic basis for otitis media is established, however, the role of rare variants in disease etiology is largely unknown. Previously a duplication variant within A2ML1 was identified as a significant risk factor for otitis media in an indigenous Filipino population and in US children. In this report exome and Sanger sequencing was performed using DNA samples from the indigenous Filipino population, Filipino cochlear implantees, US probands, Finnish, and Pakistani families with otitis media. Sixteen novel, damaging A2ML1 variants identified in otitis media patients were rare or low-frequency in population-matched controls. In the indigenous population, both gingivitis and A2ML1 variants including the known duplication variant and the novel splice variant c.4061?+?1?G>C were independently associated with otitis media. Sequencing of salivary RNA samples from indigenous Filipinos demonstrated lower A2ML1 expression according to the carriage of A2ML1 variants. Sequencing of additional salivary RNA samples from US patients with otitis media revealed differentially expressed genes that are highly correlated with A2ML1 expression levels. In particular, RND3 is upregulated in both A2ML1 variant carriers and high-A2ML1 expressors. These findings support a role for A2ML1 in keratinocyte differentiation within the middle ear as part of otitis media pathology and the potential application of ROCK inhibition in otitis media.
PubMed ID
31009165 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an eHealth Intervention to Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Among American Indian/Alaska Native Teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308304
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Jessica D Hanson
Tess L Weber
Umit Shrestha
Valerie J Bares
Michaela Seiber
Karen Ingersoll
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaskan Natives - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Contraception - psychology
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Pregnancy
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
A tribally led Changing High-Risk Alcohol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study (CHOICES) Program has successfully decreased the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEPs) among adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women by either reducing risky drinking or increasing contraception use. However, a community needs assessment revealed a need to implement a similar intervention with AI/AN teens. The goal of the project was to develop and establish the acceptability of CHOICES for AI/AN teens.
Key informant interviews were conducted to review the existing OST CHOICES intervention. After modifications to the existing program, focus groups with AI/AN teens were conducted to ensure validity and to finalize the OST CHAT (CHOICES for American Indian Teens) intervention.
Key informant (N = 15) participants suggested that a Web-based intervention may increase teen engagement by making the intervention more interactive and visually stimulating. Based on this formative research, CHAT was developed via Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Feedback on the online CHAT curriculum was given by focus groups comprised of AI/AN adolescents, and participants felt that this type of intervention would be both acceptable and able to implement with a community of reservation-based teens.
This study outlines the development of a Web-based intervention for an AEP intervention for AI/AN teens and will inform future prevention efforts. Implications include an expansion of the evidence-based CHOICES intervention for AI/AN teens and also development of a Web-based intervention for rural, reservation-based AI/AN communities.
PubMed ID
31693195 View in PubMed
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Access and Management: Indigenous Perspectives on Genomic Data Sharing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307469
Source
Ethn Dis. 2019; 29(Suppl 3):659-668
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2019
Author
Nanibaa' A Garrison
Krysta S Barton
Kathryn M Porter
Thyvu Mai
Wylie Burke
Stephanie Russo Carroll
Author Affiliation
Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute, Seattle, WA.
Source
Ethn Dis. 2019; 29(Suppl 3):659-668
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Genetic Research - ethics
Humans
Indigenous Peoples - genetics
Information Dissemination - ethics
Medicine, Traditional - trends
Metagenomics - ethics - methods
Policy Making
Social Perception
United States
Abstract
As genomic researchers are encouraged to engage in broad genomic data sharing, American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian (AI/AN/NH) leaders have raised questions about ownership of data and biospecimens and concerns over emerging challenges and potential threats to tribal sovereignty. Using a community-engaged research approach, we conducted 42 semi-structured interviews with tribal leaders, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, and tribal research review board members about their perspectives on ethical issues related to genetics in AI/AN/NH communities. We report findings related to perspectives on genetic research, data sharing, and envisioning stronger oversight and management of data. In particular, participants voiced concerns about different models of data sharing, infrastructure and logistics for housing data, and who should have authority to grant access to data. The results will ultimately guide policy-making and the creation of guidelines and new strategies for tribes to drive the research agenda and promote ethically and culturally appropriate research.
PubMed ID
31889771 View in PubMed
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Accumulated neighbourhood deprivation and coronary heart disease: a nationwide cohort study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308980
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 17; 9(9):e029248
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-17-2019
Author
Sara Larsson Lönn
Olle Melander
Casey Crump
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden sara.larsson_lonn@med.lu.se.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 17; 9(9):e029248
Date
09-17-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Neighbourhood deprivation is a recognised predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). The overall aim was to investigate if accumulated exposure to neighbourhood deprivation resulted in higher odds of CHD.
This is a longitudinal cohort study. Models based on repeated assessments of neighbourhood deprivation as well as single-point-in-time assessments were compared.
Sweden.
3?140?657 Swedish men and women without a history of CHD and who had neighbourhood deprivation exposure data over the past 15 years.
CHD within 5?years' follow-up.
The results suggested a gradient of stronger association with CHD risk by longer cumulative exposures to neighbourhood deprivation, particularly in the younger age cohorts. Neighbourhood deprivation was also highly correlated over time, especially in older age cohorts.
The effect of neighbourhood deprivation on CHD might depend on age. Accounting for individuals' baseline age may therefore be important for understanding neighbourhood environmental effects on the development of CHD over time. However, because of high correlation of neighbourhood deprivation over time, single-point-in-time assessments may be adequate for CHD risk prediction especially in older adults.
PubMed ID
31530598 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of self-reported anthropometric measures - Findings from the Finnish Twin Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308022
Source
Obes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Nov - Dec; 13(6):522-528
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Author
J Tuomela
J Kaprio
P N Sipilä
K Silventoinen
X Wang
M Ollikainen
M Piirtola
Author Affiliation
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, Helsinki, FI-00014, Finland; Finnish Gymnastics Federation, Hämeentie 105 A, 00550 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: jenni.tuomela@voimistelu.fi.
Source
Obes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Nov - Dec; 13(6):522-528
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Anthropometry
Body constitution
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sex Factors
Twins, Dizygotic - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - statistics & numerical data
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To determine the accuracy of self-reported height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) compared to the measured values, and to assess the similarity between self-reported and measured values within dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs.
The data on self-reported and measured height, weight and WC values as well as measured hip circumference (HC) were collected from 444 twin individuals (53-67 years old, 60% women). Accuracies between self-reported and measured values were assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficients, Cohen's kappa coefficients and Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement. Intra-class correlation was used in within-pair analyses.
The correlations between self-reported and measured values were high for all variables (r=0.86-0.98), although the agreement assessed by Bland-Altman 95% limits had relatively wide variation. The degree of overestimating height was similar in both sexes, whereas women tended to underestimate and men overestimate their weight. Cohen's kappa coefficients between self-reported and measured BMI categories were high: 0.71 in men and 0.70 in women. Further, the mean self-reported WC was less than the mean measured WC (difference in men 2.5cm and women 2.6cm). The within-pair correlations indicated a tendency of MZ co-twins to report anthropometric measures more similarly than DZ co-twins.
Self-reported anthropometric measures are reasonably accurate indicators for obesity in large cohort studies. However, the possibility of more similar reporting among MZ pairs should be taken into account in twin studies exploring the heritability of different phenotypes.
PubMed ID
31761633 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of later-onset Crohn's disease: results from two large prospective cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311448
Source
Gut. 2020 09; 69(9):1637-1644
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2020
Author
Hamed Khalili
Niclas Håkansson
Simon S Chan
Ye Chen
Paul Lochhead
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Andrew T Chan
Andrew R Hart
Ola Olén
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA hkhalili@mgh.harvard.edu.
Source
Gut. 2020 09; 69(9):1637-1644
Date
09-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Correlation of Data
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between Mediterranean diet and risk of later-onset Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).
We conducted a prospective cohort study of 83?147 participants (age range: 45-79 years) enrolled in the Cohort of Swedish Men and Swedish Mammography Cohort. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to calculate an adherence score to a modified Mediterranean diet (mMED) at baseline in 1997. Incident diagnoses of CD and UC were ascertained from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Cox proportional hazards modelling to calculate HRs and 95%?CI.
Through December of 2017, we confirmed 164 incident cases of CD and 395 incident cases of UC with an average follow-up of 17 years. Higher mMED score was associated with a lower risk of CD (Ptrend=0.03) but not UC (Ptrend=0.61). Compared with participants in the lowest category of mMED score (0-2), there was a statistically significant lower risk of CD (HR=0.42, 95%?CI 0.22 to 0.80) but not UC (HR=1.08, 95%?CI 0.74 to 1.58). These associations were not modified by age, sex, education level, body mass index or smoking (all Pinteraction >0.30). The prevalence of poor adherence to a Mediterranean diet (mMED score=0-2) was 27% in our cohorts, conferring a population attributable risk of 12% for later-onset CD.
In two prospective studies, greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of later-onset CD.
Notes
CommentIn: Gastroenterology. 2020 Jun;158(8):2304-2305 PMID 32315670
PubMed ID
31900290 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
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Adolescent social functioning in offspring at high risk for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in the Finnish Adoptive Family Study of Schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308280
Source
Schizophr Res. 2020 01; 215:293-299
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Ville Tikkanen
Virva Siira
Karl-Erik Wahlberg
Helinä Hakko
Kristian Läksy
Riikka Roisko
Mika Niemelä
Sami Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, P.O. Box 2000, 90014, University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Department of Psychiatry, Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, University of Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: ville.tikkanen@oulu.fi.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2020 01; 215:293-299
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child, Adopted
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Mothers
Psychosocial Functioning
Psychotic Disorders - physiopathology
Schizophrenia - physiopathology
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Interaction
Young Adult
Abstract
Children and adolescents with a genetic risk for schizophrenia are often found to have poorer social functioning compared to their controls. However, less is known about high-risk offspring who have not been reared by a biological parent with schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to examine deficits in social functioning in adolescence as a possible factor related to genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and also to examine possible gender differences in these associations.
The present sample consisted of 88 genetic high-risk (HR) adoptees whose biological mothers were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 83 genetic low-risk (LR) adoptees with biological mothers with non-schizophrenia spectrum disorders or no psychiatric disorders. Adoptees' social functioning at ages 16-20 was assessed using the UCLA Social Attainment Survey.
Compared to LR adoptees, HR adoptees displayed statistically significant deficits in their peer relationships, involvement in activities and overall social functioning during adolescence. HR males were distinguished from LR males by their significantly poorer overall social functioning. Compared to HR females, HR males showed significant deficits in their romantic relationships. Of marginal significance was that HR females displayed more social functioning deficits relative to LR females, mainly in the areas of peer relationships, involvement in activities and overall social functioning.
These results from the adoption and high-risk study design suggest that deficits in social functioning in adolescence may be related to genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia spectrum disorders and that some of these deficits may be gender-specific.
PubMed ID
31699628 View in PubMed
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