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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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Age, Sex, and Genetic and Environmental Effects on Unintentional Injuries in Young and Adult Twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298559
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 12; 21(6):502-506
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
12-2018
Author
Simo Salminen
Eero Vuoksimaa
Richard J Rose
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Psychology,University of Helsinki,Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 12; 21(6):502-506
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genetic and environment influences and sex on injury involvement using two sets of Finnish twin data. The younger participants were 955 twins born between 1983 and 1987, aged 20 to 24 years. The older participants were 12,428 twins born between 1930 and 1957, aged 33 to 60 years. Within-twin correlations in monozygotic and dizygotic twins suggested that genetic effects play no role in injury involvement among young twins, but do have some effect at older ages. The results indicated that environmental factors have greater importance in injury involvement than genetic factors in the younger twin data set (FT12), whereas in a middle-aged (33-60 years) twin data set, genetic effects explained about quarter of the variance in injury involvement. Sex was a strong contributing factor, with males being generally more prone to injuries than females.
PubMed ID
30428952 View in PubMed
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Allometric scaling of brain regions to intra-cranial volume: An epidemiological MRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289829
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
01-2017
Author
Laura W de Jong
Jean-Sébastien Vidal
Lars E Forsberg
Alex P Zijdenbos
Thaddeus Haight
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Mark A van Buchem
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Algorithms
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Brain - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Brain Mapping
Community Health Planning
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
There is growing evidence that sub-structures of the brain scale allometrically to total brain size, that is, in a non-proportional and non-linear way. Here, scaling of different volumes of interest (VOI) to intra-cranial volume (ICV) was examined. It was assessed whether scaling was allometric or isometric and whether scaling coefficients significantly differed from each other. We also tested to what extent allometric scaling of VOI was introduced by the automated segmentation technique. Furthermore, reproducibility of allometric scaling was studied different age groups and study populations. Study samples included samples of cognitively healthy adults from the community-based Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik Study) (N?=?3,883), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) (N =709), and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N?=?180). Data encompassed participants with different age, ethnicity, risk factor profile, and ICV and VOI obtained with different automated MRI segmentation techniques. Our analysis showed that (1) allometric scaling is a trait of all parts of the brain, (2) scaling of neo-cortical white matter, neo-cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter structures including the cerebellum are significantly different from each other, and (3) allometric scaling of brain structures cannot solely be explained by age-associated atrophy, sex, ethnicity, or a systematic bias from study-specific segmentation algorithm, but appears to be a true feature of brain geometry. Hum Brain Mapp 38:151-164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27557999 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294808
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-24-2018
Author
Ida Kathrine Gravensteen
Eva-Marie Jacobsen
Per Morten Sandset
Linda Bjørk Helgadottir
Ingela Rådestad
Leiv Sandvik
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O box 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ida.gravensteen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Date
01-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Birth Intervals - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Live Birth - psychology
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stillbirth - psychology
Abstract
Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.
Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (>?30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29361916 View in PubMed
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Arctic amplification is caused by sea-ice loss under increasing CO2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297436
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-10-2019
Author
Aiguo Dai
Dehai Luo
Mirong Song
Jiping Liu
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, 12222, USA. adai@albany.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Date
01-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Warming in the Arctic has been much faster than the rest of the world in both observations and model simulations, a phenomenon known as the Arctic amplification (AA) whose cause is still under debate. By analyzing data and model simulations, here we show that large AA occurs only from October to April and only over areas with significant sea-ice loss. AA largely disappears when Arctic sea ice is fixed or melts away. Periods with larger AA are associated with larger sea-ice loss, and models with bigger sea-ice loss produce larger AA. Increased outgoing longwave radiation and heat fluxes from the newly opened waters cause AA, whereas all other processes can only indirectly contribute to AA by melting sea-ice. We conclude that sea-ice loss is necessary for the existence of large AA and that models need to simulate Arctic sea ice realistically in order to correctly simulate Arctic warming under increasing CO2.
PubMed ID
30631051 View in PubMed
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Arctic ground squirrel resist peroxynitrite-mediated cell death in response to oxygen glucose deprivation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294918
Source
Free Radic Biol Med. 2017 12; 113:203-211
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
12-2017
Author
Saurav Bhowmick
Kelly L Drew
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Free Radic Biol Med. 2017 12; 113:203-211
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Brain Injuries - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Cell Death
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Food Deprivation
Glucose - metabolism
Hippocampus - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - metabolism - physiopathology
Male
Nitrosative Stress
Oxidative Stress
Oxygen - metabolism
Peroxynitrous Acid - toxicity
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reperfusion Injury - complications
Sciuridae
Abstract
Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury initiates a cascade of events, generating nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide(O2•-) to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-), a potent oxidant. Arctic ground squirrels (AGS; Urocitellus parryii) show high tolerance to I/R injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We hypothesize that tolerance to I/R modeled in an acute hippocampal slice preparation in AGS is modulated by reduced oxidative and nitrative stress. Hippocampal slices (400µm) from rat and AGS were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) using a novel microperfusion technique. Slices were exposed to NO, O2.- donors with and without OGD; pretreatment with inhibitors of NO, O2.- and ONOO- followed by OGD. Perfusates collected every 15min were analyzed for LDH release, a marker of cell death. 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) were measured to assess oxidative and nitrative stress. Results show that NO/O2.- alone is not sufficient to cause ischemic-like cell death, but with OGD enhances cell death more in rat than in AGS. A NOS inhibitor, SOD mimetic and ONOO- inhibitor attenuates OGD injury in rat but has no effect in AGS. Rats also show a higher level of 3NT and 4HNE with OGD than AGS suggesting the greater level of injury in rat is via formation of ONOO-.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28962873 View in PubMed
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The association between body mass index and postpartum depression: A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297479
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 11; 240:193-198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
11-2018
Author
Michael E Silverman
Lauren Smith
Paul Lichtenstein
Abraham Reichenberg
Sven Sandin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L, Levy Place, Box 1230, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: michael.silverman@mssm.edu.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 11; 240:193-198
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mothers
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Postpartum depression (PPD) reportedly affects between 6.5-19% of all new mothers. Identifying those at greatest risk for PPD has implications for prevention, early detection and intervention. While the relationship between extremes of body mass index (BMI) and depression has been frequently studied, the association between BMI and PPD is less understood.
Prospective cohort of all women with live singleton births in Sweden 1997-2008. We calculated the relative risk (RR) for PPD in relation to each woman's BMI and depression history. PPD diagnosis was based on a clinical diagnosis of depression within the first postpartum year.
First trimester BMI measurements were available for 611,506 women. Low BMI (?35) RRadj?=?1.23, [95% CI: 1.04-1.45] were associated with increased PPD risk. Women with a depression history had an increased risk with low BMI (RRadj?=?1.51, [95% CI: 1.17-1.95]).
Only first births were analyzed, potentially underestimating PPD incidence. Clinical data from health registries offers limited resolution regarding the specificity of diagnoses and incomplete sensitivity if women do not seek care.
First trimester of pregnancy BMI is associated with PPD risk. This risk is further modified by depression history. While low BMI places all women at risk for PPD, being overweight increases risk of PPD only in women without a history of depression. Future research should explore potentially modifiable mechanisms involved in the relationship between PPD and BMI and should also examine interventional strategies for pregnant women at the extremes of BMI and/or with a depression history.
PubMed ID
30077160 View in PubMed
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Association between iq'mik smokeless tobacco use and cardiometabolic risk profile among Yup'ik Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298510
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 07; 23(5):488-502
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
07-2018
Author
Tove K Ryman
Bert B Boyer
Scarlett E Hopkins
Jacques Philip
Beti Thompson
Shirley A A Beresford
Kenneth E Thummel
Melissa A Austin
Author Affiliation
a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 07; 23(5):488-502
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Biomarkers
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Cigarette Smoking - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco, Smokeless - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The traditional lifestyle of Yup'ik Alaska Native people, including a diet abundant in marine-based foods and physical activity, may be cardio-protective. However, iq'mik, a traditional form of smokeless tobacco used by >50% of Yup'ik adults, could increase cardiometabolic (CM) risk. Our objective was to characterize the associations between iq'mik use and biomarkers of CM status (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides [TG], systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP], glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], fasting blood glucose [FBG], waist circumference [WC], and body mass index [BMI]).
We assessed these associations using data from a cross-sectional sample of Yup'ik adults (n?=?874). Current iq'mik use, demographic, and lifestyle data were collected through interviews. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure LDL-C, HDL-C, TG, HbA1c, and FBG. SBP, DBP, WC, and BMI were obtained by physical examination. We characterized the association between current iq'mik use and continuous biomarkers of CM status using multiple approaches, including adjustment for measures of Yup'ik lifestyle and a propensity score.
Based on either adjustment method, current iq'mik use was significantly and positively associated with at least 5% higher HDL-C, and significantly associated but in an inverse direction with multiple biomarkers of CM status including 7% lower TG, 0.05% lower HbA1c, 2% lower FBG, 4% lower WC, and 4% lower BMI. Observed associations for LDL-C, SBP, and DBP varied by adjustment method.
This inverse association between iq'mik use and cardiometabolic risk status has not been previously reported. Additional research is needed to replicate these findings and explore physiological mechanisms and/or confounding factors.
PubMed ID
28116909 View in PubMed
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Association of belief in the "firewater myth" with strategies to avoid alcohol consequences among American Indian and Alaska Native college students who drink.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297404
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2018 06; 32(4):401-409
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Vivian M Gonzalez
Monica C Skewes
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2018 06; 32(4):401-409
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - psychology
Culture
Female
Harm Reduction
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Self Efficacy
Students - psychology
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Belief in an American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) specific biological vulnerability (BV) to alcohol problems (aka the "firewater myth") is associated with worse alcohol outcomes among AI/AN college students who drink, despite also being associated with greater attempts to reduce drinking. The current study examined how belief in a BV may have affected how 157 AI/AN college students who drink (a) attempted to moderate their alcohol use and avoid alcohol-related problems using abstinence-based and harm reduction strategies, and (b) attitudes toward these strategies as a means of addressing alcohol problems. Contrary to our hypotheses, belief in a BV was not found to be associated with use of harm reduction strategies or with how effective students believed these strategies to be. However, greater belief in a BV was associated with lower self-efficacy for the use of harm reduction strategies among more frequent heavy episodic drinkers. This is concerning, as the use of harm reduction strategies was associated with less frequent heavy episodic drinking in this sample. In contrast, belief in a BV was positively associated with the use of abstinence-based strategies and with how effective these strategies were perceived to be. However, for individuals with average or greater belief in a BV, abstinence-based strategies were associated with greater alcohol consequences. The results suggest that for AI/AN students who drink, belief in a BV may be influencing the strategies used to moderate alcohol use and avoid alcohol-related harm, as well as attitudes toward these strategies, in ways that do not appear helpful. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
29723011 View in PubMed
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