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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
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Age, Sex, and Genetic and Environmental Effects on Unintentional Injuries in Young and Adult Twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298559
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 12; 21(6):502-506
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
12-2018
Author
Simo Salminen
Eero Vuoksimaa
Richard J Rose
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Psychology,University of Helsinki,Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2018 12; 21(6):502-506
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genetic and environment influences and sex on injury involvement using two sets of Finnish twin data. The younger participants were 955 twins born between 1983 and 1987, aged 20 to 24 years. The older participants were 12,428 twins born between 1930 and 1957, aged 33 to 60 years. Within-twin correlations in monozygotic and dizygotic twins suggested that genetic effects play no role in injury involvement among young twins, but do have some effect at older ages. The results indicated that environmental factors have greater importance in injury involvement than genetic factors in the younger twin data set (FT12), whereas in a middle-aged (33-60 years) twin data set, genetic effects explained about quarter of the variance in injury involvement. Sex was a strong contributing factor, with males being generally more prone to injuries than females.
PubMed ID
30428952 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Allometric scaling of brain regions to intra-cranial volume: An epidemiological MRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289829
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
01-2017
Author
Laura W de Jong
Jean-Sébastien Vidal
Lars E Forsberg
Alex P Zijdenbos
Thaddeus Haight
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Mark A van Buchem
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Algorithms
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Brain - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Brain Mapping
Community Health Planning
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
There is growing evidence that sub-structures of the brain scale allometrically to total brain size, that is, in a non-proportional and non-linear way. Here, scaling of different volumes of interest (VOI) to intra-cranial volume (ICV) was examined. It was assessed whether scaling was allometric or isometric and whether scaling coefficients significantly differed from each other. We also tested to what extent allometric scaling of VOI was introduced by the automated segmentation technique. Furthermore, reproducibility of allometric scaling was studied different age groups and study populations. Study samples included samples of cognitively healthy adults from the community-based Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik Study) (N?=?3,883), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) (N =709), and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N?=?180). Data encompassed participants with different age, ethnicity, risk factor profile, and ICV and VOI obtained with different automated MRI segmentation techniques. Our analysis showed that (1) allometric scaling is a trait of all parts of the brain, (2) scaling of neo-cortical white matter, neo-cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter structures including the cerebellum are significantly different from each other, and (3) allometric scaling of brain structures cannot solely be explained by age-associated atrophy, sex, ethnicity, or a systematic bias from study-specific segmentation algorithm, but appears to be a true feature of brain geometry. Hum Brain Mapp 38:151-164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27557999 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics, acetaminophen and infections during prenatal and early life in relation to type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300352
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1538-1548
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
German Tapia
Ketil Størdal
Karl Mårild
Christian R Kahrs
Torild Skrivarhaug
Pål R Njølstad
Geir Joner
Lars C Stene
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1538-1548
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - complications
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infection - complications
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Abstract
Infections in early life have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk, but no previous study has comprehensively analysed exposure to antibiotics, acetaminophen and infections during pregnancy and early childhood in relation to offspring risk of T1D.
Participants in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n?=?114 215 children, of whom 403 children were diagnosed with T1D) reported infections and medication use through repeated questionnaires from pregnancy until the children were 18?months old. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for offspring T1D were estimated through Cox regression adjusted for child's sex, maternal age and parity, maternal T1D, smoking in pregnancy, education level, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and birthweight. Antibiotic use was also analysed in a population-based register cohort of 541 036 children of whom 836 developed T1D.
Hospitalization for gastroenteritis during the first 18?months of life was associated with increased risk (aHR 2.27, 95% CI 1.21 - 4.29, P?=?0.01) of T1D. Childhood infections not requiring hospitalization, or any kind of maternal infection during pregnancy, did not predict offspring risk of T1D. Antibiotic or acetaminophen use in pregnancy, or child`s use in early childhood, was not associated with risk of T1D.
Our study, which is population-based and the largest of its kind, did not find support for general early life infections, infection frequency or use of antibiotics or acetaminophen to play a major role in childhood T1D. Hospital admission for gastroenteritis was associated with T1D risk, but must be interpreted cautiously due to scarcity of cases.
PubMed ID
29868838 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294808
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-24-2018
Author
Ida Kathrine Gravensteen
Eva-Marie Jacobsen
Per Morten Sandset
Linda Bjørk Helgadottir
Ingela Rådestad
Leiv Sandvik
Øivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O box 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ida.gravensteen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2018 01 24; 18(1):41
Date
01-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Birth Intervals - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Live Birth - psychology
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stillbirth - psychology
Abstract
Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.
Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (>?30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval?
Notes
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PubMed ID
29361916 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic amplification is caused by sea-ice loss under increasing CO2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298890
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-10-2019
Author
Aiguo Dai
Dehai Luo
Mirong Song
Jiping Liu
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, 12222, USA. adai@albany.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Date
01-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Climate change
Geography
Global warming
Ice Cover
Seasons
Seawater - chemistry
Solar Energy
Temperature
Abstract
Warming in the Arctic has been much faster than the rest of the world in both observations and model simulations, a phenomenon known as the Arctic amplification (AA) whose cause is still under debate. By analyzing data and model simulations, here we show that large AA occurs only from October to April and only over areas with significant sea-ice loss. AA largely disappears when Arctic sea ice is fixed or melts away. Periods with larger AA are associated with larger sea-ice loss, and models with bigger sea-ice loss produce larger AA. Increased outgoing longwave radiation and heat fluxes from the newly opened waters cause AA, whereas all other processes can only indirectly contribute to AA by melting sea-ice. We conclude that sea-ice loss is necessary for the existence of large AA and that models need to simulate Arctic sea ice realistically in order to correctly simulate Arctic warming under increasing CO2.
PubMed ID
30631051 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic amplification is caused by sea-ice loss under increasing CO2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297436
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-10-2019
Author
Aiguo Dai
Dehai Luo
Mirong Song
Jiping Liu
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, 12222, USA. adai@albany.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 10; 10(1):121
Date
01-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Warming in the Arctic has been much faster than the rest of the world in both observations and model simulations, a phenomenon known as the Arctic amplification (AA) whose cause is still under debate. By analyzing data and model simulations, here we show that large AA occurs only from October to April and only over areas with significant sea-ice loss. AA largely disappears when Arctic sea ice is fixed or melts away. Periods with larger AA are associated with larger sea-ice loss, and models with bigger sea-ice loss produce larger AA. Increased outgoing longwave radiation and heat fluxes from the newly opened waters cause AA, whereas all other processes can only indirectly contribute to AA by melting sea-ice. We conclude that sea-ice loss is necessary for the existence of large AA and that models need to simulate Arctic sea ice realistically in order to correctly simulate Arctic warming under increasing CO2.
PubMed ID
30631051 View in PubMed
Less detail

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