Skip header and navigation

Refine By

211 records – page 1 of 22.

Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Predict Survival in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298110
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Satu Mäkelä
Markku Asola
Henrik Hadimeri
James Heaf
Maija Heiro
Leena Kauppila
Susanne Ljungman
Mai Ots-Rosenberg
Johan V Povlsen
Björn Rogland
Petra Roessel
Jana Uhlinova
Maarit Vainiotalo
Maria K Svensson
Heini Huhtala
Heikki Saha
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland satu.m.makela@pshp.fi.
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Ankle Brachial Index
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death - trends
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Calcification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice.
We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar X ray, and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device.
The median AACS was 11 (range 0 - 24). In 58% of the patients, all 4 segments of the abdominal aorta showed deposits, while 19% of patients had no visible deposits (AACS 0). Ankle-brachial index was normal in 49%, low ( 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS = 7 (p
PubMed ID
29386304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related incidence of cervical cancer supports two aetiological components: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293540
Source
BJOG. 2016 Apr; 123(5):772-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Apr-2016
Author
K Seppä
J Pitkäniemi
N Malila
M Hakama
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BJOG. 2016 Apr; 123(5):772-8
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To assess whether age-related incidence of cervical cancer supports two aetiological components and to assess trends in these components due to risk factors and to organised screening in Finland.
Population-based register study.
Finnish Cancer Registry.
Cervical cancer cases and female population in Finland in 1953-2012.
Cervical cancer incidence was estimated using Poisson regression where age-specific incidence consists of two (early-age and late-age) normally distributed components.
Accumulated net risks (incidences) and numbers of cancer cases attributed to each age-related component by calendar time.
The accumulated cervical cancer incidence in 2008-2012 was only 30% of that in 1953-1962, before the screening started. The fit of the observed age-specific rates and the rates based on the two-component model was good. In 1953-62, the accumulated net risk ratio (RR; early-age versus late-age) was 0.42 (95% CI 0.29-0.61). The early-age component disappeared in 1973-77 (RR 0.00; 95% CI 0.00-0.08). Thereafter, the risk for the early-age component increased, whereas the risk for the late-age component decreased, and in 2008-2012 the RR was 0.55 (95% CI 0.24-0.89).
In Finland, cervical cancer incidence has two age-related components which are likely to indicate differences in risk factors of each component. The trend in risk of both components followed the effects of organised screening. Furthermore, the risk related to the early-age component followed changes in risk factors, such as oncogenic HPV infections and other sexually transmitted diseases and smoking habits.
Cervical cancer incidence has two age-related components which are likely to have differencies in their aetiology.
PubMed ID
26599730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal incontinence after caesarean and vaginal delivery in Sweden: a national population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299811
Source
Lancet. 2019 Mar 23; 393(10177):1233-1239
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Mar-23-2019
Author
Charlotta Larsson
Charlotta Linder Hedberg
Ewa Lundgren
Lars Söderström
Katarina TunÓn
Pär Nordin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå and Hospital of Östersund, Östersund, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2019 Mar 23; 393(10177):1233-1239
Date
Mar-23-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - methods
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Fecal Incontinence - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Pelvic Floor Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Elective caesarean delivery is increasing rapidly in many countries, and one of the reasons might be that caesarean delivery is widely believed to protect against pelvic floor disorders, including anal incontinence. Previous studies on this issue have been small and with conflicting results. The aim of present study was to compare the risk of developing anal incontinence in women who had a caesarean delivery, in those who had a vaginal delivery, and in two age-matched control groups (nulliparous women and men).
In this observational population-based study, we included all women in the Swedish Medical Birth Register who gave birth by caesarean delivery or vaginal delivery during 1973-2015 in Sweden and were diagnosed with anal incontinence according to ICD 8-10 in the Swedish National Patient Register during 2001-15. Exclusion criteria were multiple birth delivery, mixed vaginal and caesarean delivery, and four or more deliveries. We compared the diagnosis of anal incontinence between women previously delivered solely by caesarean delivery and those who solely had delivered vaginally. We also compared it with two age-matched control groups of nulliparous women and men from the Swedish Total Population Register. Finally, we analysed risk factors for anal incontinence in the caesarean delivery and vaginal delivery groups.
3?755?110 individuals were included in the study. Between 1973 and 2015, 185?219 women had a caesarean delivery only and 1?400?935 delivered vaginally only. 416 (0·22 %) of the 185?219 women in the caesarean delivery group were diagnosed with anal incontinence compared with 5171 (0·37%) of 1?400?935 women in the vaginal delivery group. The odds ratio (OR) for being diagnosed with anal incontinence after vaginal delivery compared with caesarean delivery was 1·65 (95% CI 1·49-1·82; p
Notes
CommentIn: Lancet. 2019 Mar 23;393(10177):1183-1184 PMID 30799058
PubMed ID
30799061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of penetrating keratoplasty in Northern Alberta, Canada, from 2000 to 2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301334
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2018 12; 53(6):568-573
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
12-2018
Author
Matthew D Benson
Khaliq Kurji
Calvin Tseng
Bo Bao
Dean Mah
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2018 12; 53(6):568-573
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Corneal Diseases - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Keratoplasty, Penetrating - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Young Adult
Abstract
To study indications for penetrating keratoplasty (PK) at a single site. The trends in the causative organisms for infectious keratitis requiring surgery were also evaluated.
Retrospective observational study.
A total of 1181 eyes of 935 patients undergoing PK between January 2000 and December 2015 in Northern Alberta, Canada.
Indications for PK were evaluated over the 16-year study period, and the trends in these indications were compared over 5-year intervals. The microbiology of infectious keratitis cases requiring surgery was similarly evaluated.
The most common indications for PK from 2000 to 2015 were keratoconus (23%), re-graft (22%), and corneal scar (12%). There was a decline in the percent of total surgeries done for Fuchs' dystrophy (p = 1.1 × 10-3) and pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (p = 5.6 × 10-5), whereas a corresponding increase in keratoconus (p = 3.2 × 10-5), trauma (p = 2.1 × 10-3), and infectious keratitis cases (p = 0.010) was observed. The most common causes for infectious keratitis cases were viral (45%), bacterial (18%), parasitic (11%), and fungal (9%). There was a significant increase in the percent of infectious keratitis cases due to a viral etiology from 2005 to 2010 (p = 6.4 × 10-3).
The indications for PK are comparable with other centres in North America. Nearly half of all infectious keratitis cases requiring surgery are viral. The increase in viral cases requiring surgery may reflect improved diagnostics or recurrent cases.
PubMed ID
30502979 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploratory study of long-haul truck drivers' secondary tasks and reasons for performing them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294982
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2018 Aug; 117:154-163
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Tobias Iseland
Emma Johansson
Siri Skoog
Anna M Dåderman
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Education, and Sociology, University West, SE-461 86 Trollhättan, Sweden. Electronic address: tobias.iseland@hotmail.com.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2018 Aug; 117:154-163
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Boredom
Cell Phone - utilization
Distracted Driving - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Risk assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workload
Abstract
Research on drivers has shown how certain visual-manual secondary tasks, unrelated to driving, increase the risk of being involved in crashes. The purpose of the study was to investigate (1) if long-haul truck drivers in Sweden engage in secondary tasks while driving, what tasks are performed and how frequently, (2) the drivers' self-perceived reason/s for performing them, and (3) if psychological factors might reveal reasons for their engaging in secondary tasks. The study comprised 13 long-haul truck drivers and was conducted through observations, interviews, and questionnaires. The drivers performed secondary tasks, such as work environment related "necessities" (e.g., getting food and/or beverages from the refrigerator/bag, eating, drinking, removing a jacket, face rubbing, and adjusting the seat), interacting with a mobile phone/in-truck technology, and doing administrative tasks. The long-haul truck drivers feel bored and use secondary tasks as a coping strategy to alleviate boredom/drowsiness, and for social interaction. The higher number of performed secondary tasks could be explained by lower age, shorter driver experience, less openness to experience, lower honesty-humility, lower perceived stress, lower workload, and by higher health-related quality of life. These explanatory results may serve as a starting point for further studies on large samples to develop a safer and healthier environment for long-haul truck drivers.
PubMed ID
29702333 View in PubMed
Less detail

An observational study of immigrant mortality differences in Norway by reason for migration, length of stay and characteristics of sending countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299020
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 04 17; 18(1):508
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
04-17-2018
Author
Astri Syse
Minja T Dzamarija
Bernadette N Kumar
Esperanza Diaz
Author Affiliation
Statistics Norway, Oslo, Norway. sya@ssb.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 04 17; 18(1):508
Date
04-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
Knowledge of mortality differentials in immigrant groups depending on their reason for migration, length of stay in host countries and characteristics of sending countries may be beneficial for policy interventions aimed to improve various immigrant groups' health and welfare.
We employed discrete-time hazard regression models with time-varying covariates to compare the death risk of immigrants to those of Norwegian-born natives using linked register data on the Norwegian population aged 25-79 during 1990-2015. More than 492,000 deaths occurred in around 4.6 million individuals. All analyses were adjusted for sex, age, calendar time and sociodemographic characteristics.
Immigrants had an 11% survival advantage overall. Those immigrating due to work or education had the lowest death risk, whereas refugees had the highest death risk (albeit lower than that of natives). Death risks increased markedly with length of stay, and were most pronounced for those having spent more than 40% of their lives in Norway. Net of reason for migration, only minor differences were observed depending on Human Development Index characteristics of sending countries.
Independent of reason for migration and characteristics of sending countries, those who immigrate to Norway in adulthood appear to be particularly healthy. The higher death risk associated with prolonged lengths of stay suggests that disadvantageous 'acculturation' or stress factors related to the post-migration period may play a role in the long run. The health and welfare of long-term immigrants thus warrants further research.
PubMed ID
29665802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic prescription and clinical management of common infections among general practitioners in Latvia, Lithuania, and Sweden: a pilot survey with a simple protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294307
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2018 Feb; 37(2):355-361
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Uga Dumpis
Annika Hahlin
Sonata Varvuolyte
Stephan Stenmark
Sarmite Veide
Rolanda Valinteliene
Asta Jurkeviciene
Johan Struwe
Author Affiliation
Pauls Stradins University Hospital, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2018 Feb; 37(2):355-361
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Amdinocillin Pivoxil - therapeutic use
Amoxicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Clavulanic Acid - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Floxacillin - therapeutic use
General Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Latvia
Lithuania
Male
Penicillin V - therapeutic use
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Comparative information on diagnosis-related antibiotic prescribing patterns are scarce from primary care within and between countries. To describe and compare antibiotic prescription and routine management of infections in primary care in Latvia (LV), Lithuania (LT) and two study sites in Sweden (SE), a cross-sectional observational study on patients who consulted due to sypmtoms compatible with infection was undetraken. Infection and treatment was detected and recorded by physicians only. Data was collected from altogether 8786 consecutive patients with infections in the three countries. Although the overall proportion of patients receiving an antibiotic prescription was similar in all three countries (LV and LT 42%, SE 38%), there were differences in the rate of prescription between the countries depending on the respective diagnoses. While penicillins dominated among prescriptions (LV 58%, LT 67%, SE 70%), phenoxymethylpenicillin was most commonly prescribed in Sweden (57% of all penicillins), while it was amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid in Latvia (99%) and Lithuania (85%) respectively. Pivmecillinam and flucloxacillin, which accounted for 29% of penicillins in Sweden, were available neither in Latvia nor in Lithuania. The applied methodology was simple, and provided useful information on differences in treatment of common infections in ambulatory care in the absence of available computerized diagnosis-prescription data. Despite some limitations, the method can be used for assessment of intention to treat and compliance to treatment guidelines and benchmarking locally, nationally, or internationally, just as the point prevalence surveys (PPS) protocols have been used in hospitals all over Europe.
Notes
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2013 Jan 12;14:9 PMID 23311389
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Feb 12-18;365(9459):579-87 PMID 15708101
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(12):920-6 PMID 11868766
Cites: BMJ. 2010 May 18;340:c2096 PMID 20483949
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(8):648-54 PMID 18979603
Cites: Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Oct;45(10):568-76 PMID 17966843
Cites: Przegl Epidemiol. 2014;68(1):33-8, 121-5 PMID 25004629
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Dec;66 Suppl 6:vi3-12 PMID 22096064
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1722-30 PMID 18976555
Cites: Crit Care. 2010;14(3):R113 PMID 20546564
Cites: Springerplus. 2013 Mar 21;2(1):124 PMID 23667800
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2010 Apr 23;11:29 PMID 20416034
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Jun 04;(6):CD000247 PMID 23733381
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 1998 Jan-Feb;7(1):45-9 PMID 9443698
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-82 PMID 11927025
PubMed ID
29218467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298134
Source
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother. 2018 01 01; 4(1):36-45
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-01-2018
Author
Gorav Batra
Leif Friberg
David Erlinge
Stefan James
Tomas Jernberg
Bodil Svennblad
Lars Wallentin
Jonas Oldgren
Author Affiliation
Uppsala Clinical Research Center and Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, MTC, Dag Hammarskjölds väg 14B, 752 37 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother. 2018 01 01; 4(1):36-45
Date
01-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - drug therapy
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Incidence
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - therapy
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Abstract
Optimal antithrombotic therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and atrial fibrillation is uncertain. In this study, we compared antithrombotic regimes with regard to a composite cardiovascular outcome of all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke, and major bleeds.
Patients between October 2005 and December 2012 were identified in Swedish registries, n?=?7116. Landmark 0-90 and 91-365 days of outcome were evaluated with Cox-regressions, with dual antiplatelet therapy as reference. At discharge, 16.2% received triple therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin), 1.9% aspirin plus warfarin, 7.3% clopidogrel plus warfarin, and 60.8% dual antiplatelets. For cardiovascular outcome, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (HR) for triple therapy was 0.86 (0.70-1.07) for 0-90?days and 0.78 (0.58-1.05) for 91-365?days. A HR of 2.16 (1.48-3.13) and 1.61 (0.98-2.66) during 0-90 and 91-365?days, respectively, was observed for major bleeds. For aspirin plus warfarin, HR 0.82 (0.54-1.26) and 0.62 (0.48-0.79) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.30 (0.60-2.85) and 1.01 (0.63-1.62) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365?days, respectively. For clopidogrel plus warfarin, HR of 0.90 (0.68-1.19) and 0.68 (0.49-0.95) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.28 (0.71-2.32) and 1.08 (0.57-2.04) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365?days, respectively.
Compared to dual antiplatelets, aspirin or clopidogrel plus warfarin therapy was associated with similar 0-90 days and lower 91-365 days of risk of the cardiovascular outcome, without higher risk of major bleeds. Triple therapy was associated with non-significant lower risk of cardiovascular outcome and higher risk of major bleeds.
PubMed ID
29126156 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are severely injured trauma victims in Norway offered advanced pre-hospital care? National, retrospective, observational cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289467
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
T Wisborg
E N Ellensen
I Svege
T Dehli
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Trauma, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Air Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Multiple Trauma
Norway
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Triage
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Studies of severely injured patients suggest that advanced pre-hospital care and/or rapid transportation provides a survival benefit. This benefit depends on the disposition of resources to patients with the greatest need. Norway has 19 Emergency Helicopters (HEMS) staffed by anaesthesiologists on duty 24/7/365. National regulations describe indications for their use, and the use of the national emergency medical dispatch guideline is recommended. We assessed whether severely injured patients had been treated or transported by advanced resources on a national scale.
A national survey was conducted collecting data for 2013 from local trauma registries at all hospitals caring for severely injured patients. Patients were analysed according to hospital level; trauma centres or acute care hospitals with trauma functions. Patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were considered severely injured.
Three trauma centres (75%) and 17 acute care hospitals (53%) had data for trauma patients from 2013, a total of 3535 trauma registry entries (primary admissions only), including 604 victims with an ISS > 15. Of these 604 victims, advanced resources were treating and/or transporting 51%. Sixty percent of the severely injured admitted directly to trauma centres received advanced services, while only 37% of the severely injured admitted primarily to acute care hospitals received these services.
A highly developed and widely distributed HEMS system reached only half of severely injured trauma victims in Norway in 2013.
Notes
Cites: Air Med J. 2003 May-Jun;22(3):35-41 PMID 12748530
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 May 10;24:66 PMID 27164973
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 Mar;59(3):384-91 PMID 25582880
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2015 Oct;32(10):813-6 PMID 25527473
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Nov 12;22:64 PMID 25388400
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):10-20 PMID 19853251
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Oct;57(9):1175-85 PMID 24001223
Cites: N Z Med J. 2014 Sep 12;127(1402):30-42 PMID 25228419
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-96 PMID 4814394
Cites: Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52 PMID 19540486
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014;18 Suppl 1:35-44 PMID 24279767
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):660-8 PMID 23289798
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):27-9 PMID 19524235
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):659-67 PMID 26810562
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Jul;58(6):726-32 PMID 24773521
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Dec 15;(12):CD009228 PMID 26671262
Cites: BMC Emerg Med. 2013 Jul 01;13:11 PMID 23815080
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2014 Nov;49(11):1673-7 PMID 25475816
Cites: Injury. 2015 Jul;46(7):1197-206 PMID 25863418
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012 Dec 18;20:82 PMID 23244708
Cites: World J Surg. 2007 Nov;31(11):2092-103 PMID 17899256
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2015 Feb;50(2):347-52 PMID 25638635
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2013 Oct;62(4):351-364.e19 PMID 23582619
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009 Jan 09;17:1 PMID 19134177
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2008 Aug 28;16:7 PMID 18957069
PubMed ID
28653327 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are severely injured trauma victims in Norway offered advanced pre-hospital care? National, retrospective, observational cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289625
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
T Wisborg
E N Ellensen
I Svege
T Dehli
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Trauma, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2017 Aug; 61(7):841-847
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Air Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Multiple Trauma
Norway
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Triage
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
Studies of severely injured patients suggest that advanced pre-hospital care and/or rapid transportation provides a survival benefit. This benefit depends on the disposition of resources to patients with the greatest need. Norway has 19 Emergency Helicopters (HEMS) staffed by anaesthesiologists on duty 24/7/365. National regulations describe indications for their use, and the use of the national emergency medical dispatch guideline is recommended. We assessed whether severely injured patients had been treated or transported by advanced resources on a national scale.
A national survey was conducted collecting data for 2013 from local trauma registries at all hospitals caring for severely injured patients. Patients were analysed according to hospital level; trauma centres or acute care hospitals with trauma functions. Patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were considered severely injured.
Three trauma centres (75%) and 17 acute care hospitals (53%) had data for trauma patients from 2013, a total of 3535 trauma registry entries (primary admissions only), including 604 victims with an ISS > 15. Of these 604 victims, advanced resources were treating and/or transporting 51%. Sixty percent of the severely injured admitted directly to trauma centres received advanced services, while only 37% of the severely injured admitted primarily to acute care hospitals received these services.
A highly developed and widely distributed HEMS system reached only half of severely injured trauma victims in Norway in 2013.
Notes
Cites: Air Med J. 2003 May-Jun;22(3):35-41 PMID 12748530
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 May 10;24:66 PMID 27164973
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 Mar;59(3):384-91 PMID 25582880
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2015 Oct;32(10):813-6 PMID 25527473
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Nov 12;22:64 PMID 25388400
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):10-20 PMID 19853251
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Oct;57(9):1175-85 PMID 24001223
Cites: N Z Med J. 2014 Sep 12;127(1402):30-42 PMID 25228419
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-96 PMID 4814394
Cites: Injury. 2010 May;41(5):444-52 PMID 19540486
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014;18 Suppl 1:35-44 PMID 24279767
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):660-8 PMID 23289798
Cites: Injury. 2010 Jan;41(1):27-9 PMID 19524235
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):659-67 PMID 26810562
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 Jul;58(6):726-32 PMID 24773521
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Dec 15;(12):CD009228 PMID 26671262
Cites: BMC Emerg Med. 2013 Jul 01;13:11 PMID 23815080
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2014 Nov;49(11):1673-7 PMID 25475816
Cites: Injury. 2015 Jul;46(7):1197-206 PMID 25863418
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012 Dec 18;20:82 PMID 23244708
Cites: World J Surg. 2007 Nov;31(11):2092-103 PMID 17899256
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2015 Feb;50(2):347-52 PMID 25638635
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2013 Oct;62(4):351-364.e19 PMID 23582619
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009 Jan 09;17:1 PMID 19134177
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2008 Aug 28;16:7 PMID 18957069
PubMed ID
28653327 View in PubMed
Less detail

211 records – page 1 of 22.