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18F FDG-PET/CT evaluation of histological response after neoadjuvant treatment in patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299743
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-2019
Author
Stefan Gabrielson
Alejandro Sanchez-Crespo
Fredrik Klevebro
Rimma Axelsson
Jon Albert Tsai
Ove Johansson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Esophageal Neoplasms - therapy
Esophagogastric Junction - diagnostic imaging
Esophagus - diagnostic imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Norway
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals
Sweden
Abstract
In most parts of the world, curatively intended treatment for esophageal cancer includes neoadjuvant therapy, either with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy alone, followed by esophagectomy. Currently 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for preoperative disease staging, but is not well established in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment.
To evaluate changes in PET parameters in relation to the histological primary tumor response in the surgical specimen in patients randomized to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy.
Patients were randomized between either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy.18F-FDG PET/CT exams were conducted at baseline and following neoadjuvant treatment. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) values were measured in the primary tumor and compared as regards histological responders and non-responders as well as different treatment arms.
Seventy-nine patients were enrolled and 51 were available for analysis. A significant rate of SUR reduction was observed ( P?=?0.02) in the primary tumor in histological responders compared to non-responders. Changes in SUR were significantly greater in responders following chemoradiotherapy ( P?=?0.02), but not following chemotherapy alone ( P?=?0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in SUR in patients with a complete histological response compared to those with a subtotal response.
Our results are similar to those of previous studies and show that changes in the rate of SUR can be used reliably to differentiate histological responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant treatment with either chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Limitations of current PET technology are likely to restrict the possibility of accurately ruling out limited residual disease.
PubMed ID
30111193 View in PubMed
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A2ML1 and otitis media: novel variants, differential expression, and relevant pathways.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310601
Source
Hum Mutat. 2019 08; 40(8):1156-1171
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
08-2019
Author
Eric D Larson
Jose Pedrito M Magno
Matthew J Steritz
Erasmo Gonzalo D V Llanes
Jonathan Cardwell
Melquiadesa Pedro
Tori Bootpetch Roberts
Elisabet Einarsdottir
Rose Anne Q Rosanes
Christopher Greenlee
Rachel Ann P Santos
Ayesha Yousaf
Sven-Olrik Streubel
Aileen Trinidad R Santos
Amanda G Ruiz
Sheryl Mae Lagrana-Villagracia
Dylan Ray
Talitha Karisse L Yarza
Melissa A Scholes
Catherine B Anderson
Anushree Acharya
Samuel P Gubbels
Michael J Bamshad
Stephen P Cass
Nanette R Lee
Rehan S Shaikh
Deborah A Nickerson
Karen L Mohlke
Jeremy D Prager
Teresa Luisa G Cruz
Patricia J Yoon
Generoso T Abes
David A Schwartz
Abner L Chan
Todd M Wine
Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz
Norman Friedman
Katerina Kechris
Juha Kere
Suzanne M Leal
Ivana V Yang
Janak A Patel
Ma Leah C Tantoco
Saima Riazuddin
Kenny H Chan
Petri S Mattila
Maria Rina T Reyes-Quintos
Zubair M Ahmed
Herman A Jenkins
Tasnee Chonmaitree
Lena Hafrén
Charlotte M Chiong
Regie Lyn P Santos-Cortez
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.
Source
Hum Mutat. 2019 08; 40(8):1156-1171
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Down-Regulation
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Profiling - methods
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Otitis Media - genetics
Pakistan
Pedigree
Philippines
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Signal Transduction
United States
Young Adult
alpha-Macroglobulins - genetics
Abstract
A genetic basis for otitis media is established, however, the role of rare variants in disease etiology is largely unknown. Previously a duplication variant within A2ML1 was identified as a significant risk factor for otitis media in an indigenous Filipino population and in US children. In this report exome and Sanger sequencing was performed using DNA samples from the indigenous Filipino population, Filipino cochlear implantees, US probands, Finnish, and Pakistani families with otitis media. Sixteen novel, damaging A2ML1 variants identified in otitis media patients were rare or low-frequency in population-matched controls. In the indigenous population, both gingivitis and A2ML1 variants including the known duplication variant and the novel splice variant c.4061?+?1?G>C were independently associated with otitis media. Sequencing of salivary RNA samples from indigenous Filipinos demonstrated lower A2ML1 expression according to the carriage of A2ML1 variants. Sequencing of additional salivary RNA samples from US patients with otitis media revealed differentially expressed genes that are highly correlated with A2ML1 expression levels. In particular, RND3 is upregulated in both A2ML1 variant carriers and high-A2ML1 expressors. These findings support a role for A2ML1 in keratinocyte differentiation within the middle ear as part of otitis media pathology and the potential application of ROCK inhibition in otitis media.
PubMed ID
31009165 View in PubMed
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Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Predict Survival in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298110
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Satu Mäkelä
Markku Asola
Henrik Hadimeri
James Heaf
Maija Heiro
Leena Kauppila
Susanne Ljungman
Mai Ots-Rosenberg
Johan V Povlsen
Björn Rogland
Petra Roessel
Jana Uhlinova
Maarit Vainiotalo
Maria K Svensson
Heini Huhtala
Heikki Saha
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland satu.m.makela@pshp.fi.
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Ankle Brachial Index
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death - trends
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Calcification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice.
We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar X ray, and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device.
The median AACS was 11 (range 0 - 24). In 58% of the patients, all 4 segments of the abdominal aorta showed deposits, while 19% of patients had no visible deposits (AACS 0). Ankle-brachial index was normal in 49%, low ( 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS = 7 (p
PubMed ID
29386304 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of surgical complication rate estimation using ICD-10 codes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302167
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 02; 106(3):236-244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
02-2019
Author
A Storesund
A S Haugen
M Hjortås
M W Nortvedt
H Flaatten
G E Eide
M A Boermeester
N Sevdalis
E Søfteland
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Br J Surg. 2019 02; 106(3):236-244
Date
02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Coding
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Operative Time
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
The ICD-10 codes are used globally for comparison of diagnoses and complications, and are an important tool for the development of patient safety, healthcare policies and the health economy. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of verified complication rates in surgical admissions identified by ICD-10 codes and to validate these estimates against complications identified using the established Global Trigger Tool (GTT) methodology.
This was a prospective observational study of a sample of surgical admissions in two Norwegian hospitals. Complications were identified and classified by two expert GTT teams who reviewed patients' medical records. Three trained reviewers verified ICD-10 codes indicating a complication present on admission or emerging in hospital.
A total of 700 admissions were drawn randomly from 12 966 procedures. Some 519 possible complications were identified in 332 of 700 admissions (47·4 per cent) from ICD-10 codes. Verification of the ICD-10 codes against information from patients' medical records confirmed 298 as in-hospital complications in 141 of 700 admissions (20·1 per cent). Using GTT methodology, 331 complications were found in 212 of 700 admissions (30·3 per cent). Agreement between the two methods reached 83·3 per cent after verification of ICD-10 codes. The odds ratio for identifying complications using the GTT increased from 5·85 (95 per cent c.i. 4·06 to 8·44) to 25·38 (15·41 to 41·79) when ICD-10 complication codes were verified against patients' medical records.
Verified ICD-10 codes strengthen the accuracy of complication rates. Use of non-verified complication codes from administrative systems significantly overestimates in-hospital surgical complication rates.
PubMed ID
30229870 View in PubMed
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The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
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Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
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Acute Kidney Injury After Acute Repair of Type A Aortic Dissection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311398
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2021 04; 111(4):1292-1298
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2021
Author
Dadi Helgason
Solveig Helgadottir
Anders Ahlsson
Jarmo Gunn
Vibeke Hjortdal
Emma C Hansson
Anders Jeppsson
Ari Mennander
Shahab Nozohoor
Igor Zindovic
Christian Olsson
Stefan Orri Ragnarsson
Martin I Sigurdsson
Arnar Geirsson
Tomas Gudbjartsson
Author Affiliation
Internal Medicine Services, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: dadihelga@gmail.com.
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2021 04; 111(4):1292-1298
Date
04-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Aged
Aneurysm, Dissecting - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Renal Replacement Therapy - methods
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) after surgery for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) using the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection registry.
Patients who underwent ATAAD surgery at 8 Nordic centers from 2005 to 2014 were analyzed for AKI according to the RIFLE criteria. Patients who died intraoperatively, those who had missing baseline or postoperative serum creatinine, and patients on preoperative renal replacement therapy were excluded.
AKI occurred in 382 of 941 patients (40.6%), and postoperative dialysis was required for 105 patients (11.0%). Renal malperfusion was present preoperatively in 42 patients (5.1%), of whom 69.0% developed postoperative AKI. In multivariable analysis patient-related predictors of AKI included age (per 10 years; odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-1.48), body mass index >30 kg/m2 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.51-3.09), renal malperfusion (OR, 4.39; 95% CI, 2.23-9.07), and other malperfusion (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.55-2.86). Perioperative predictors were cardiopulmonary bypass time (per 10 minutes; OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.07) and red blood cell transfusion (OR per transfused unit, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.06-1.10). Rates of 30-day mortality were 17.0% in the AKI group compared with 6.6% in the non-AKI group (P
PubMed ID
32961133 View in PubMed
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Acute stroke care during the first phase of COVID-19 pandemic in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310963
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
Silje Holt Jahr
Kashif Waqar Faiz
Anette Margrethe Storstein
Bendik Slagsvold Winsvold
Else Charlotte Sandset
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - methods - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - methods - trends
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic affected the hospital stroke management and research in Norway.
All neurological departments with a Stroke Unit in Norway (n = 17) were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the first lockdown period, and all questions were thus answered in regard to the period between 12 March and 15 April 2020.
The responder rate was 94% (16/17). Eighty-one % (13/16) reported that the pandemic affected their department, and 63% (10/16) changed their stroke care pathways. The number of new acute admissions in terms of both strokes and stroke mimics decreased at all 16 departments. Fewer patients received thrombolysis and endovascular treatment, and multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation services were less available. The mandatory 3 months of follow-up of stroke patients was postponed at 73% of the hospitals. All departments conducting stroke research reported a stop in ongoing projects.
In Norway, hospital-based stroke care and research were impacted during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, with likely repercussions for patient care and outcomes. In the future, stroke departments will require contingency plans in order to protect the entire stroke treatment chain.
PubMed ID
33421104 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a Russian population to SARS-CoV-2: Asymptomatic course, comorbidities, mortality, and other respiratory viruses - A reply to Fear versus Data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305323
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: const.sharov@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Date
Oct-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asymptomatic Diseases
Betacoronavirus - pathogenicity
COVID-19
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Coronavirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study was conducted to assess the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Russia and the adaptation of the population to the virus in March to June 2020. Two groups were investigated: 1) 12 082 individuals already proven positive for SARS-CoV-2 (clinical information was studied); 2) 7864+4458 individuals with suspected respiratory infections (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests and clinical information were studied). In the latter, SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals comprised 5.37% in March and 11.42% in June 2020. Several viral co-infections were observed for SARS-CoV-2. Rhinoviruses accounted for the largest proportion of co-infections (7.91% of samples were SARS-CoV-2-positive); followed by respiratory syncytial virus (7.03%); adenoviruses (4.84%); metapneumoviruses (3.29%); parainfluenza viruses (2.42%); enterovirus D68 (1.10%) and other viruses (entero-, echo-, parecho-) (
PubMed ID
32653618 View in PubMed
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Adherence and medication belief in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: A nationwide population-based cohort survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296214
Source
Clin Respir J. 2018 Jun; 12(6):2029-2035
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Bodil Ivarsson
Roger Hesselstrand
Göran Rådegran
Barbro Kjellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Clin Respir J. 2018 Jun; 12(6):2029-2035
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Medication Adherence
Morbidity - trends
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Pulmonary Embolism - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) are rare diseases with a gradual decline in physical health. Adherence to treatment is crucial in these very symptomatic and life threatening diseases.
To describe PAH and CTEPH patients experience of their self-reported medication adherence, beliefs about medicines and information about treatment.
A quantitative, descriptive, national cohort survey that included adult patients from all PAH-centres in Sweden. All patients received questionnaires by mail: The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) assesses treatment-related attitudes and behaviour problems, the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-Specific scale (BMQ-S) assesses the patient's perception of drug intake and the QLQ-INFO25 multi-item scale about medical treatment information.
The response rate was 74% (n?=?325), mean age 66?±?14 years, 58% were female and 69% were diagnosed with PAH and 31% with CTEPH. Time from diagnosis was 4.7?±?4.2 years. More than half of the patients (57%) reported a high level of adherence. There was no difference in the patients' beliefs of the necessity of the medications to control their illness when comparing those with high, medium or low adherence. Despite high satisfaction with the information, concerns about potential adverse effects of taking the medication were significantly related to adherence.
Treatment adherence is relatively high but still needs improvement. The multi-disciplinary PAH team should, together with the patient, seek strategies to improve adherence and prevent concern.
PubMed ID
29356440 View in PubMed
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