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259 records – page 1 of 26.

Accuracy of Xpert® Mycobacterium tuberculosis/rifampicin assay in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303115
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2019 07; 51(7):550-553
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
07-2019
Author
Ira Shah
Rasika Bhamre
Naman S Shetty
Author Affiliation
a Paediatric TB Clinic, Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases , B. J. Wadia Hospital for Children , Mumbai , India.
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2019 07; 51(7):550-553
Date
07-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Humans
Minors
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Rifampin
Sweden
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Notes
CommentOn: Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Jul;49(7):501-506 PMID 28276801
PubMed ID
31012780 View in PubMed
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Adult but no pediatric anaphylaxis-related deaths in the Finnish population from 1996 to 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294745
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 08; 138(2):630-2
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2016
Author
Juho E Kivistö
Teija Dunder
Jennifer L P Protudjer
Jussi Karjalainen
Heini Huhtala
Mika J Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Allergy Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Centre for Child Health Research, Tampere University and University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: juho.kivisto@uta.fi.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 08; 138(2):630-2
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anaphylaxis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Drug Hypersensitivity - complications - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - complications - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Insect Bites and Stings - complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
PubMed ID
27343204 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of posterior uveitis in a tertiary centre in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309391
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2020 Feb; 98(1):e135-e136
Publication Type
Letter
Date
Feb-2020

African Swine Fever Virus, Siberia, Russia, 2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298288
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 04; 24(4):796-798
Publication Type
Historical Article
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Denis Kolbasov
Ilya Titov
Sodnom Tsybanov
Andrey Gogin
Alexander Malogolovkin
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 04; 24(4):796-798
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
African Swine Fever - epidemiology - history - virology
African Swine Fever Virus - classification - genetics
Animals
DNA, Viral
Genome, Viral
Genotype
History, 21st Century
Siberia - epidemiology
Swine
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is arguably the most dangerous and emerging swine disease worldwide. ASF is a serious problem for the swine industry. The first case of ASF in Russia was reported in 2007. We report an outbreak of ASF in Siberia, Russia, in 2017.
PubMed ID
29553323 View in PubMed
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Age-specific incidence of new asthma diagnoses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296726
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Hannu Kankaanranta
Leena E Tuomisto
Pinja Ilmarinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: hannu.kankaanranta@epshp.fi.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - diagnosis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Reimbursement Mechanisms
PubMed ID
27765463 View in PubMed
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Alcohol control policy: The emperor's new clothes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307108
Source
Health Policy. 2020 03; 124(3):336-337
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
03-2020
Author
Alain Braillon
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, 80000 Amiens, France. Electronic address: braillon.alain@gmail.com.
Source
Health Policy. 2020 03; 124(3):336-337
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Finland
Goals
Public Health
Public Policy
Notes
CommentOn: Health Policy. 2020 Jan;124(1):1-6 PMID 31708165
PubMed ID
32001044 View in PubMed
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Amplification of plant volatile defence against insect herbivory in a warming Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302856
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2019
Author
Tao Li
Thomas Holst
Anders Michelsen
Riikka Rinnan
Author Affiliation
Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. tao.li@bio.ku.dk.
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Date
06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Betula - immunology - parasitology
Ecosystem
Global warming
Herbivory
Insecta - physiology
Tundra
Volatile Organic Compounds - metabolism
Abstract
Plant-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play fundamental roles in atmospheric chemistry and ecological processes by contributing to aerosol formation1 and mediating species interactions2. Rising temperatures and the associated shifts in vegetation composition have been shown to be the primary drivers of plant VOC emissions in Arctic ecosystems3. Although herbivorous insects also strongly alter plant VOC emissions2, no studies have addressed the impact of herbivory on plant VOC emissions in the Arctic. Here we show that warming dramatically increases the amount, and alters the blend, of VOCs released in response to herbivory. We observed that a tundra ecosystem subjected to warming, by open-top chambers, for 8 or 18 years showed a fourfold increase in leaf area eaten by insect herbivores. Herbivory by autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) larvae, and herbivory-mimicking methyl jasmonate application, on the widespread circumpolar dwarf birch (Betula nana) both substantially increased emissions of terpenoids. The long-term warming treatments and mimicked herbivory caused, on average, a two- and fourfold increase in monoterpene emissions, respectively. When combined, emissions increased 11-fold, revealing a strong synergy between warming and herbivory. The synergistic effect was even more pronounced for homoterpene emissions. These findings suggest that, in the rapidly warming Arctic, insect herbivory may be a primary determinant of VOC emissions during periods of active herbivore feeding.
PubMed ID
31182843 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amplification of plant volatile defence against insect herbivory in a warming Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300874
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2019
Author
Tao Li
Thomas Holst
Anders Michelsen
Riikka Rinnan
Author Affiliation
Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. tao.li@bio.ku.dk.
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Date
06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Plant-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play fundamental roles in atmospheric chemistry and ecological processes by contributing to aerosol formation1 and mediating species interactions2. Rising temperatures and the associated shifts in vegetation composition have been shown to be the primary drivers of plant VOC emissions in Arctic ecosystems3. Although herbivorous insects also strongly alter plant VOC emissions2, no studies have addressed the impact of herbivory on plant VOC emissions in the Arctic. Here we show that warming dramatically increases the amount, and alters the blend, of VOCs released in response to herbivory. We observed that a tundra ecosystem subjected to warming, by open-top chambers, for 8 or 18 years showed a fourfold increase in leaf area eaten by insect herbivores. Herbivory by autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) larvae, and herbivory-mimicking methyl jasmonate application, on the widespread circumpolar dwarf birch (Betula nana) both substantially increased emissions of terpenoids. The long-term warming treatments and mimicked herbivory caused, on average, a two- and fourfold increase in monoterpene emissions, respectively. When combined, emissions increased 11-fold, revealing a strong synergy between warming and herbivory. The synergistic effect was even more pronounced for homoterpene emissions. These findings suggest that, in the rapidly warming Arctic, insect herbivory may be a primary determinant of VOC emissions during periods of active herbivore feeding.
PubMed ID
31182843 View in PubMed
Less detail

259 records – page 1 of 26.