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18585 records – page 1 of 1859.

1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
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1-Methylcyclopropene maintains postharvest quality in Norwegian apple fruit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311296
Source
Food Sci Technol Int. 2020 Jul; 26(5):420-429
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2020
Author
N Falagán
L A Terry
Author Affiliation
Plant Science Laboratory, Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK.
Source
Food Sci Technol Int. 2020 Jul; 26(5):420-429
Date
Jul-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Color
Cyclopropanes
Ethylenes
Food Preservation - methods
Food Storage - methods
Fruit - drug effects - metabolism - standards
Hardness
Humans
Malus - classification
Norway
Odorants
Plant Growth Regulators
Refrigeration
Species Specificity
Sucrose - metabolism
Abstract
Norwegian fruit production is mostly destined for the local market and can suffer from poor-quality retention during storage. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) is an inhibitor of ethylene perception used to maintain the physical and functional quality of pome fruit. Extensive work has been carried out on the effect of 1-MCP on apples, but not on cultivars grown in Norway. In this work, the potential of 1-MCP application (0.625?ml l -1 for 24?h at 0?±?1?) for ripening control of the apple cultivars 'Aroma', 'Red Gravenstein', and 'Summered' was studied during 1 and 1.5 months of cold storage; both scenarios were followed by five days of shelf life. The application of 1-MCP reduced softening by an average of 12% in 'Aroma', 'Red Gravenstein', and 'Summered' apples when cold stored for both 1 and 1.5 months as compared to control. External colour remained similar to initial values in 1-MCP fruit when compared to control apples, which presented a significant skin darkening. This indicated a delay in the ripening process. 1-MCP treatment did not affect total soluble solids content. 'Aroma' samples treated with 1-MCP showed a low sucrose hydrolysis, indicating a slower ripening process. This work confirms that 1-MCP postharvest treatment shows great potential for maintenance of apple cvs. in Norway during cold storage and shelf life.
PubMed ID
31876183 View in PubMed
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A 3D Follow-Up Study of Cranial Asymmetry from Early Infancy to Toddler Age after Preterm versus Term Birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308637
Source
J Clin Med. 2019 Oct 11; 8(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-11-2019
Author
Anniina M Launonen
Henri Aarnivala
Panagiotis Kyteas
Ville Vuollo
Tuomo Heikkinen
Chung H Kau
Pertti Pirttiniemi
Virpi Harila
A Marita Valkama
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. anniina.launonen@oulu.fi.
Source
J Clin Med. 2019 Oct 11; 8(10):
Date
Oct-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Preterm infants are at higher risk for both symmetrical and asymmetrical head molding. This study involved 3D stereophotogrammetry to assess the cranial growth, molding, and incidence of deformational plagiocephaly (DP) in preterm children compared to term born children. Thirty-four preterm infants and 34 term born controls were enrolled in this study from Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Three-dimensional head images were obtained at the age of 2-4 months (T1), 5-7 months (T2), 11-13 months (T3), and 2.5-3 years (T4) from the term equivalent age (TEA). There was no statistically significant difference in oblique cranial length ratio (OCLR), cephalic index (CI), or weighted asymmetry score (wAS) between the two groups. Occipital flattening, defined by flatness score (FS) was statistically significantly greater in the preterm group than in the term group at T1-T4 (p
PubMed ID
31614700 View in PubMed
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The 5-HTTLPR rs25531 LALA-genotype increases the risk of insomnia symptoms among shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310411
Source
Sleep Med. 2019 08; 60:224-229
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2019
Author
Ståle Pallesen
Daniel Pitz Jacobsen
Morten B Nielsen
Johannes Gjerstad
Author Affiliation
Department for Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: pklsp@uib.no.
Source
Sleep Med. 2019 08; 60:224-229
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Shift Work Schedule - adverse effects
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - genetics
Abstract
Previous studies indicate that shift work tolerance may be associated with individual factors including genetic variability in the gene encoding the serotonin transporter 5-HTT (SLC6A4). The present study aimed to explore the interaction between work schedule (shift work versus non-shift work), genetic variability in SLC6A4 and insomnia symptoms.
The study was based on a national probability sample survey of 987 Norwegian employees drawn from The Norwegian Central Employee Register by Statistics Norway. Insomnia symptoms were assessed by three items reflecting problems with sleep onset, sleep maintenance, and early morning awakenings. Genotyping concerning SLC6A4 (the 5-HTTLPR S versus L and the SNP rs25531 A versus G) was carried out using a combination of gel-electrophoresis and TaqMan assay.
Using the LALA genotype as a reference a main effect of the SS genotype (B = 0.179; 95% CI = 0.027-0.330) was found. In addition, a main effect of work schedule (0 = non shift, 1 = shift work) was found (B = 0.504; 95% CI = 0.185-0.823). The genotype x work schedule interaction was significant for all genotypes; SLA (B = -0.590; 95% CI = -0.954-0.216), LALG (B = -0.879; 95% CI = -1.342-0.415), SLG (B = -0.705; 95% CI = -1.293-0.117) and SS (B = -0.773; 95% CI = -1.177-0.369) indicating higher insomnia symptom scores among LALA-participants compared to participants with other genotypes when working shifts.
The ability to cope with shift work is associated with the combination of the SLC6A4 variants 5-HTTLPR and SNP rs25531. Our findings demonstrated that the LALA-genotype increases the risk of insomnia symptoms among shift workers.
PubMed ID
31213395 View in PubMed
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A 5-Year Continued Follow-up of Cancer Risk and All-Cause Mortality Among Norwegian Military Peacekeepers Deployed to Kosovo During 1999-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311620
Source
Mil Med. 2020 02 12; 185(1-2):e239-e243
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-12-2020
Author
Leif Aage Strand
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Einar Kristian Borud
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Armed Forces Joint Medical Services, Institute of Military Medicine and Epidemiology, Sessvollmoen Garnison, N-2018 Sessvollmoen, Norway.
Source
Mil Med. 2020 02 12; 185(1-2):e239-e243
Date
02-12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kosovo
Male
Military Personnel
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Risk
Abstract
In 2012, Norwegian news media reported on cases of brain cancer among Norwegian peacekeeping troops who served in Kosovo, allegedly caused by exposure to depleted uranium fired during airstrikes before the peacekeepers arrived in 1999. A first study followed 6076 military men and women with peacekeeping service in Kosovo during 1999-2011 for cancers and deaths throughout 2011. The study did not support to the idea that peacekeeping service in Kosovo could lead to increased risk of brain cancer or other cancers. However, the average time of follow-up (10.6 years) was rather short for cancer development; therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate cancer risk and general mortality in an updated cohort after 5 years of additional follow-up.
The updated cohort consisted of 6,159 peacekeepers (5,884 men and 275 women) who served in Kosovo during 1999-2016 and were followed for cancer incidence and mortality from all causes combined throughout 2016. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) from national population rates. Poisson regression was used to assess the effect of length of service (
PubMed ID
31322664 View in PubMed
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6-Bromoindole Derivatives from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Geodia barretti: Isolation and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295994
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Xiaxia Di
Caroline Rouger
Ingibjorg Hardardottir
Jona Freysdottir
Tadeusz F Molinski
Deniz Tasdemir
Sesselja Omarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Hagi, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. xid1@hi.is.
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
An UPLC-qTOF-MS-based dereplication study led to the targeted isolation of seven bromoindole alkaloids from the sub-Arctic sponge Geodia barretti. This includes three new metabolites, namely geobarrettin A?C (1?3) and four known compounds, barettin (4), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (5), 6-bromoconicamin (6), and l-6-bromohypaphorine (7). The chemical structures of compounds 1?7 were elucidated by extensive analysis of the NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute stereochemistry of geobarrettin A (1) was assigned by ECD analysis and Marfey's method employing the new reagent l-Na-(1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)tryptophanamide (l-FDTA). The isolated compounds were screened for anti-inflammatory activity using human dendritic cells (DCs). Both 2 and 3 reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40, but 3 concomitantly increased IL-10 production. Maturing DCs treated with 2 or 3 before co-culturing with allogeneic CD4? T cells decreased T cell secretion of IFN-?, indicating a reduction in Th1 differentiation. Although barettin (4) reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40 and IL-10 (IC50 values 11.8 and 21.0 µM for IL-10 and IL-12p40, respectively), maturing DCs in the presence of 4 did not affect the ability of T cells to secrete IFN-? or IL-17, but reduced their secretion of IL-10. These results indicate that 2 and 3 may be useful for the treatment of inflammation, mainly of the Th1 type.
PubMed ID
30413031 View in PubMed
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6-Bromoindole Derivatives from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Geodia barretti: Isolation and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298348
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Xiaxia Di
Caroline Rouger
Ingibjorg Hardardottir
Jona Freysdottir
Tadeusz F Molinski
Deniz Tasdemir
Sesselja Omarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Hagi, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. xid1@hi.is.
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alkaloids - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Aquatic Organisms
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Coculture Techniques
Dendritic Cells
Geodia
Humans
Iceland
Indoles - chemistry
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Interleukin-10 - metabolism
Interleukin-12 Subunit p40 - metabolism
Peptides, Cyclic - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
An UPLC-qTOF-MS-based dereplication study led to the targeted isolation of seven bromoindole alkaloids from the sub-Arctic sponge Geodia barretti. This includes three new metabolites, namely geobarrettin A?C (1?3) and four known compounds, barettin (4), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (5), 6-bromoconicamin (6), and l-6-bromohypaphorine (7). The chemical structures of compounds 1?7 were elucidated by extensive analysis of the NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute stereochemistry of geobarrettin A (1) was assigned by ECD analysis and Marfey's method employing the new reagent l-Na-(1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)tryptophanamide (l-FDTA). The isolated compounds were screened for anti-inflammatory activity using human dendritic cells (DCs). Both 2 and 3 reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40, but 3 concomitantly increased IL-10 production. Maturing DCs treated with 2 or 3 before co-culturing with allogeneic CD4? T cells decreased T cell secretion of IFN-?, indicating a reduction in Th1 differentiation. Although barettin (4) reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40 and IL-10 (IC50 values 11.8 and 21.0 µM for IL-10 and IL-12p40, respectively), maturing DCs in the presence of 4 did not affect the ability of T cells to secrete IFN-? or IL-17, but reduced their secretion of IL-10. These results indicate that 2 and 3 may be useful for the treatment of inflammation, mainly of the Th1 type.
PubMed ID
30413031 View in PubMed
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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295799
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Nov 02; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-02-2018
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Nov 02; :
Date
Nov-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301335
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetics, Population
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Population Groups
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
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18585 records – page 1 of 1859.