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7161 records – page 1 of 717.

1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
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6-Bromoindole Derivatives from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Geodia barretti: Isolation and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298348
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Xiaxia Di
Caroline Rouger
Ingibjorg Hardardottir
Jona Freysdottir
Tadeusz F Molinski
Deniz Tasdemir
Sesselja Omarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Hagi, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. xid1@hi.is.
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alkaloids - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Aquatic Organisms
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Coculture Techniques
Dendritic Cells
Geodia
Humans
Iceland
Indoles - chemistry
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Interleukin-10 - metabolism
Interleukin-12 Subunit p40 - metabolism
Peptides, Cyclic - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
An UPLC-qTOF-MS-based dereplication study led to the targeted isolation of seven bromoindole alkaloids from the sub-Arctic sponge Geodia barretti. This includes three new metabolites, namely geobarrettin A?C (1?3) and four known compounds, barettin (4), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (5), 6-bromoconicamin (6), and l-6-bromohypaphorine (7). The chemical structures of compounds 1?7 were elucidated by extensive analysis of the NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute stereochemistry of geobarrettin A (1) was assigned by ECD analysis and Marfey's method employing the new reagent l-Na-(1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)tryptophanamide (l-FDTA). The isolated compounds were screened for anti-inflammatory activity using human dendritic cells (DCs). Both 2 and 3 reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40, but 3 concomitantly increased IL-10 production. Maturing DCs treated with 2 or 3 before co-culturing with allogeneic CD4? T cells decreased T cell secretion of IFN-?, indicating a reduction in Th1 differentiation. Although barettin (4) reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40 and IL-10 (IC50 values 11.8 and 21.0 µM for IL-10 and IL-12p40, respectively), maturing DCs in the presence of 4 did not affect the ability of T cells to secrete IFN-? or IL-17, but reduced their secretion of IL-10. These results indicate that 2 and 3 may be useful for the treatment of inflammation, mainly of the Th1 type.
PubMed ID
30413031 View in PubMed
Less detail

6-Bromoindole Derivatives from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Geodia barretti: Isolation and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295994
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Xiaxia Di
Caroline Rouger
Ingibjorg Hardardottir
Jona Freysdottir
Tadeusz F Molinski
Deniz Tasdemir
Sesselja Omarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Hagi, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. xid1@hi.is.
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
An UPLC-qTOF-MS-based dereplication study led to the targeted isolation of seven bromoindole alkaloids from the sub-Arctic sponge Geodia barretti. This includes three new metabolites, namely geobarrettin A?C (1?3) and four known compounds, barettin (4), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (5), 6-bromoconicamin (6), and l-6-bromohypaphorine (7). The chemical structures of compounds 1?7 were elucidated by extensive analysis of the NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute stereochemistry of geobarrettin A (1) was assigned by ECD analysis and Marfey's method employing the new reagent l-Na-(1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)tryptophanamide (l-FDTA). The isolated compounds were screened for anti-inflammatory activity using human dendritic cells (DCs). Both 2 and 3 reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40, but 3 concomitantly increased IL-10 production. Maturing DCs treated with 2 or 3 before co-culturing with allogeneic CD4? T cells decreased T cell secretion of IFN-?, indicating a reduction in Th1 differentiation. Although barettin (4) reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40 and IL-10 (IC50 values 11.8 and 21.0 µM for IL-10 and IL-12p40, respectively), maturing DCs in the presence of 4 did not affect the ability of T cells to secrete IFN-? or IL-17, but reduced their secretion of IL-10. These results indicate that 2 and 3 may be useful for the treatment of inflammation, mainly of the Th1 type.
PubMed ID
30413031 View in PubMed
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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295799
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Nov 02; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-02-2018
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Nov 02; :
Date
Nov-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
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A 10-year review found increasing incidence trends of emergency egg allergy reactions and food-induced anaphylaxis in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292434
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2018 Jun 19; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-19-2018
Author
J Österlund
A Winberg
C E West
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2018 Jun 19; :
Date
Jun-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
International reports have suggested that food allergies and food-induced anaphylaxis have increased in children. We investigated the incidence of emergency food reactions over a 10-year period.
This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children presenting to Umeå University hospital, Sweden, with an emergency food reaction from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Cases were identified using discharge codes for allergies and anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis cases were included if they fulfilled the international criteria.
We found emergency food allergy reactions in 519 children (58% boys) from 2006-2015 at a median age of 1.3 years. One-third were hospitalised (32%) including 71/99 cases of anaphylaxis. Milk and eggs were the most commonly identified triggers. Emergency reactions to eggs increased during the study period with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of 0.770 (p 
PubMed ID
29920760 View in PubMed
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A 12-year National Study of Suicide by Jumping From Bridges in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293093
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Aleksandra Sæheim
Ingebjørg Hestetun
Erlend Mork
Latha Nrugham
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from several countries suggest that erecting fences on bridges more commonly used for suicide by jumping may be an effective way of reducing the risk of suicide by jumping from these bridges. Distribution of suicides by jumping off bridges has not yet been studied on a national level in any country. This study included all suicides by jumping from high places registered in the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry (COD) in the period 1999-2010 (n = 319). Combining data from the COD registry and information from police records, 71 cases of suicide by jumping off a bridge were identified involving 36 bridges. This form of suicide constituted approximately 1% of all suicides in Norway in the period 1999-2010. Almost half of these suicides were registered at only 6 bridges. Three Norwegian bridges were secured during the observation period of this study. Two bridges had barriers installed on the full length of the bridge with 11 suicides registered before barriers were installed, and none after. On the 1 bridge that was only partially secured, no change in numbers of suicides was observed after barriers were installed. One-third of jumps from bridges occurred over land. We found that although suicide by jumping off bridges was a relatively rare event, there is a potential for saving lives by installing physical barriers on bridges that are more commonly used for suicide by jumping.
PubMed ID
27309998 View in PubMed
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21st century climate change impacts on marine animal biomass and ecosystem structure across ocean basins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295788
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 Nov 08; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz
Derek P Tittensor
Julia L Blanchard
William W L Cheung
Marta Coll
Eric D Galbraith
Simon Jennings
Olivier Maury
Heike K Lotze
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 Nov 08; :
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Climate change effects on marine ecosystems include impacts on primary production, ocean temperature, species distributions and abundance at local to global scales. These changes will significantly alter marine ecosystem structure and function with associated socio-economic impacts on ecosystem services, marine fisheries, and fishery-dependent societies. Yet how these changes may play out among ocean basins over the 21st century remains unclear, with most projections coming from single ecosystem models that do not adequately capture the range of model uncertainty. We address this by using six marine ecosystem models within the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project (Fish-MIP) to analyze responses of marine animal biomass in all major ocean basins to contrasting climate change scenarios. Under a high emissions scenario (RCP8.5), total marine animal biomass declined by an ensemble mean of 15-30% (±12-17%) in the North and South Atlantic and Pacific, and the Indian Ocean by 2100, whereas polar ocean basins experienced a 20-80% (±35-200%) increase. Uncertainty and model disagreement were greatest in the Arctic and smallest in the South Pacific Ocean. Projected changes were reduced under a low (RCP2.6) emissions scenario. Under RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, biomass projections were highly correlated with changes in net primary production and negatively correlated with projected sea surface temperature increases across all ocean basins except the polar oceans. Ecosystem structure was projected to shift as animal biomass concentrated in different size-classes across ocean basins and emissions scenarios. We highlight that climate change mitigation measures could moderate the impacts on marine animal biomass by reducing biomass declines in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean basins. The range of individual model projections emphasizes the importance of using an ensemble approach in assessing uncertainty of future change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
30408274 View in PubMed
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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294379
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 Aug 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 Aug 15; 9(1):3262
Date
Aug-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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7161 records – page 1 of 717.