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Shift work and risk of incident dementia: a study of two population-based cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296175
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct; 33(10):977-987
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Kathleen Bokenberger
Arvid Sjölander
Anna K Dahl Aslan
Ida K Karlsson
Torbjörn Åkerstedt
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, 17177, Stockholm, Sweden. kathleen.bokenberger@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct; 33(10):977-987
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Shift Work Schedule - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and incident dementia in two population-based cohorts from the Swedish Twin Registry (STR). The STR-1973 sample included 13,283 participants born 1926-1943 who received a mailed questionnaire in 1973 that asked about status (ever/never) and duration (years) of shift work employment. The Screening Across the Lifespan Twin (SALT) sample included 41,199 participants born 1900-1958 who participated in a telephone interview in 1998-2002 that asked about night work status and duration. Dementia diagnoses came from Swedish patient registers. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Potential confounders such as age, sex, education, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke were included in adjusted models. In genotyped subsamples (n = 2977 in STR-1973; n = 10,366 in SALT), APOE e4 status was considered in models. A total of 983 (7.4%) and 1979 (4.8%) dementia cases were identified after a median of 41.2 and 14.1 years follow-up in the STR-1973 and SALT sample, respectively. Ever shift work (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.15-1.60) and night work (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.23) were associated with higher dementia incidence. Modest dose-response associations were observed, where longer duration shift work and night work predicted increased dementia risk. Among APOE e4 carriers, individuals exposed to =?20 years of shift work and night work had increased dementia risk compared to day workers. Findings indicate that shift work, including night shift work, compared to non-shift jobs is associated with increased dementia incidence. Confirmation of findings is needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30076495 View in PubMed
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Night work as a risk factor of future disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses: a prospective cohort study of Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292256
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 08 01; 27(4):659-664
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017
Author
Sanna Kärkkäinen
Annina Ropponen
Jurgita Narusyte
Lisa Mather
Torbjörn Åkerstedt
Karri Silventoinen
Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz
Pia Svedberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, School of Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 08 01; 27(4):659-664
Date
08-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Shift Work Schedule - adverse effects
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated the associations between night work, sleep and disability pension (DP) due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), while controlling for several confounding factors including both genetic factors and shared family background.
The study sample consisted of 27 165 Swedish twin individuals born in 1935-58 with comprehensive survey data on sociodemographic, health and lifestyle factors. Night work was assessed as years of working hours at night at least every now and then, and categorized into 'not at all, 1-10 years and over 10 years'. Data on DP with MSD (ICD-diagnoses M00-M99) were obtained from the National Social Insurance Agency. Follow-up was from the time of the interview in 1998-2003 until 2013. Information on the length and quality of sleep was available for a sub-sample of twins (n = 1684). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
During the follow-up, 1338 (5%) participants were granted DP due to MSD. Both 1-10 years (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.17-1.53) and over 10 years of night work (HR 1.39 95% CI 1.18-1.64) increased the risk of future DP. The associations were not affected by health, lifestyle or sleep factors. In the discordant twin pair analysis, the associations between night work and DP due to MSD attenuated.
Night work was associated with increased risk of DP due to MSD independently from health and lifestyle factors. Familial confounding could not be ruled out.
PubMed ID
28633449 View in PubMed
Less detail