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119 records – page 1 of 12.

The 100th Anniversary of the Russian Pavlov Physiological Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293488
Source
Physiology (Bethesda). 2017 Nov; 32(6):402-407
Publication Type
Editorial
Historical Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Richard E Brown
Zoltán Molnár
Ludmila Filaretova
Mikhail Ostrovsky
Marco Piccolino
Lorenzo Lorusso
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
Source
Physiology (Bethesda). 2017 Nov; 32(6):402-407
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Historical Article
Keywords
Anniversaries and Special Events
History, 20th Century
Humans
Physiology - history
Russia
Societies, Medical - history
PubMed ID
28978630 View in PubMed
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1602nd Military clinical hospital celebrates the 75th anniversary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298653
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2016 Jun; 337(6):77-81
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
S V Papko
V G Kokoev
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2016 Jun; 337(6):77-81
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Hospitals, Military - history
Military Medicine - history
Russia
Abstract
The article is devoted to the 75th anniversary of the the 1602nd Military clinical hospital. The history of the hospital is overview. The authors covered the establishment and main periods of the development of this large medical facility of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. Modern state and possibilities of a hospital as a therapeutic, preventive and research institution.
PubMed ID
30806510 View in PubMed
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The 1628 Vasa Inquest in Sweden: Learning Contemporary Lessons for Effective Death Investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301332
Source
J Law Med. 2018 Dec; 26(2):285-299
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Ian Freckelton
Author Affiliation
Barrister, Crockett Chambers, Melbourne; Professorial Fellow of Law, University of Melbourne; Adjunct Professor of Forensic Medicine, Monash University.
Source
J Law Med. 2018 Dec; 26(2):285-299
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Coroners and Medical Examiners - history
Death
History, 17th Century
Humans
Ships - history
Sweden
Abstract
Much that is constructive can be achieved from analysis of death investigations that have failed to achieve desirable outcomes in terms of learning lessons about risks to health and safety and in terms of gaining an understanding as to how further tragedies can be avoided. This article reviews an "inquest" into the sinking in 1628 of the pride of the Swedish Navy, the Vasa, and the factors that led to the inquest failing to come to grips with the various design, building, oversight, subcontracting, communication, and co-ordination flaws that contributed to the vessel being foreseeably unstable and thus unseaworthy. It argues that Reason's Swiss cheese analysis of systemic contributions to risk and modern principles of Anglo-Australasian-Canadian death investigation shed light on how a better investigation of the tragedy that cost 30 lives and a disastrous loss of a vessel of unparalleled cost to the Kingdom of Sweden could have led to more useful insights into the multifactorial causes of the sinking of the Vasa than were yielded by the inquest.
PubMed ID
30574717 View in PubMed
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1918 pandemic morbidity: The first wave hits the poor, the second wave hits the rich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299653
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Svenn-Erik Mamelund
Author Affiliation
Work Research Institute, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 05; 12(3):307-313
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
History, 20th Century
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919 - economics - statistics & numerical data
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Class
Vaccination
Abstract
Whether morbidity from the 1918-19 influenza pandemic discriminated by socioeconomic status has remained a subject of debate for 100 years. In lack of data to study this issue, the recent literature has hypothesized that morbidity was "socially neutral."
To study the associations between influenza-like illness (ILI) and socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and wave during the 1918-19 influenza pandemic.
Availability of incidence data on the 1918-19 pandemic is scarce, in particular for waves other than the "fall wave" October-December 1918. Here, an overlooked survey from Bergen, Norway (n = 10 633), is used to study differences in probabilities of ILI and ILI probability ratios by apartment size as a measure of SES and gender for 3 waves including the waves prior to and after the "fall wave."
Socioeconomic status was negatively associated with ILI in the first wave, but positively associated in the second wave. At all SES levels, men had the highest ILI in the summer, while women had the highest ILI in the fall. There were no SES or gender differences in ILI in the winter of 1919.
For the first time, it is documented a crossover in the role of socioeconomic status in 1918 pandemic morbidity. The poor came down with influenza first, while the rich with less exposure in the first wave had the highest morbidity in the second wave. The study suggests that the socioeconomically disadvantaged should be prioritized if vaccines are of limited availability in a future pandemic.
PubMed ID
29356350 View in PubMed
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Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-30-2017
Author
Jon Røyne Kyllingstad
Author Affiliation
Norsk Teknisk Museum/The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo, Norway, jon.kyllingstad@tekniskmuseum.no.
Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Date
Dec-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropology
Continental Population Groups - ethnology - history
Emigration and Immigration
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Minority Groups
Norway - ethnology
Racism - ethnology - history
Science
PubMed ID
28708062 View in PubMed
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African Swine Fever Virus, Siberia, Russia, 2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298288
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 04; 24(4):796-798
Publication Type
Historical Article
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Denis Kolbasov
Ilya Titov
Sodnom Tsybanov
Andrey Gogin
Alexander Malogolovkin
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 04; 24(4):796-798
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
African Swine Fever - epidemiology - history - virology
African Swine Fever Virus - classification - genetics
Animals
DNA, Viral
Genome, Viral
Genotype
History, 21st Century
Siberia - epidemiology
Swine
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is arguably the most dangerous and emerging swine disease worldwide. ASF is a serious problem for the swine industry. The first case of ASF in Russia was reported in 2007. We report an outbreak of ASF in Siberia, Russia, in 2017.
PubMed ID
29553323 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and health in Russia: good news at last.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295039
Source
Lancet. 2017 Sep 30; 390(10102):1616-1618
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-30-2017

[Alcoholism at the end of 1980-s and beginning of 2010-s].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294852
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Author
Nemtsov A V
Orlov A V
Author Affiliation
Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry Branch of Serbsky Federal Medical Research Center of Psychiatry and Narcology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - history
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis - classification - history - utilization
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the 20-years' clinical alteration and alcoholism basing on the changes in its clinical symptoms and course.
The study included 527 alcoholics with formed alcohol withdrawal syndrome: 181 alcoholics were examined in 1988-1990 (Group 1) and 346 alcoholics in 2011-2012 (Group 2).
In Group 1, vodka consumption dominated at all stages of alcoholism. Group 2 included 172 alcoholics with the domination of vodka consumption and 174 alcoholics with mixed consumption. It was shown that in comparison with Group 1 (1988-1990 patients) patients from Group 2 (2011-2012) had slower and mild development of alcoholism, especially those in the mixed consumption group. The authors suggest that the change of the clinical pattern in Group 2 was due to the change in the composition of consumed alcoholic beverages.
???? ?????????????. ??????? ????????? ??????? ? ??????? ??????????? ?? 20 ???. ???????? ? ??????. ??????????? 527 ??????? ???????????? ?? ?????????????? ??????????? ???????????? ?????????, ?? ??????? 181 ??????? ?????????? ? 1988-1990 ??. ? 346 ??????? - ? 2011-2012 ??. ?????????? ? ??????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ????? 1980-?, ???????????? ????? ?? ???? ?????? ???????? ???????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ?????? 2010-?, ? ????? ??????? ????? ???????????? ???????????? ????? (172 ????????), ? ?????? ????? (174 ???????) ???? ????????? ???????????. ????????, ??? ? ????????? ? ???????? 20-?????? ???????? ? ???????, ????????????? ? 2011-2012 ??., ?????????? ??????????? ????????? ? ????????? ?????, ???????? ? ?????? ?? ????????? ????????????. ??????? ?????????????, ??? ????????? ??????????? ??????? ? ??????? ?????? 2010-? ????? ??????????? ?????????? ??????? ???????????? ??????????? ????????.
PubMed ID
27456905 View in PubMed
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Always stay cheerful - health information in the 1920s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298442
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
10-30-2018
Author
Erlend Hem
Rannveig Nordhagen
Per E Børdahl
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Date
10-30-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health - history
Consumer Health Information - history
Health Education - history
Health Promotion - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Mothers - education - history
Norway
Posters as Topic
Preventive Health Services - history
Public Health - history
Abstract
The interwar period was a time of comprehensive preventive health programmes in Norway. Physical exercise, nutritious diets, strict sleep regimens and better hygiene were at the centre of these efforts. A massive mobilisation of volunteers and professionals took place. The publication of House Maxims for Mothers and Children was part of this large-scale mobilisation, and consisted of ten posters with pithy health advice for hanging on the wall. Mothers were an important target group for health promotion.
The posters have previously received little attention in medical literature, but they can elucidate some features of life and the health propaganda of their time. We have used databases that provide access to newspapers, books and medical literature: Retriever, bokhylla.no, Oria, PubMed and Web of Science.
It is hard to quantify the effect of this popular movement when compared to political measures to improve living conditions. In any case, mortality rates fell, life expectancy increased and the dreaded communicable diseases were largely defeated. Special efforts were targeted at children, also with good results. Infant mortality fell and schoolchildren became healthier, stronger, taller and cleaner.
The line between social hygiene and general disciplining is blurred, for example the boundary between a healthy diet and bourgeois norms. The education of mothers and children also included a normative aspect that concerned good manners and control.
Notes
ErratumIn: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 Oct 31;138(19): PMID 30497256
PubMed ID
30378403 View in PubMed
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Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292108
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 08 22; 114(34):9152-9157
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-22-2017
Author
Bastiaan Star
Sanne Boessenkool
Agata T Gondek
Elena A Nikulina
Anne Karin Hufthammer
Christophe Pampoulie
Halvor Knutsen
Carl André
Heidi M Nistelberger
Jan Dierking
Christoph Petereit
Dirk Heinrich
Kjetill S Jakobsen
Nils Chr Stenseth
Sissel Jentoft
James H Barrett
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway; n.c.stenseth@ibv.uio.no bastiaan.star@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 08 22; 114(34):9152-9157
Date
08-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Bone and Bones - metabolism
DNA, Ancient - analysis - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Fisheries - history
Fossils
Gadus morhua - genetics
Geography
Germany
History, Medieval
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent source of endogenous DNA (15-46%) of sufficient quality for whole-genome reconstruction. By comparing ancient sequence data to that of modern specimens, we determine the biological origin of 15 Viking Age (800-1066 CE) and subsequent medieval (1066-1280 CE) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) specimens from excavation sites in Germany, Norway, and the United Kingdom. Archaeological context indicates that one of these sites was a fishing settlement for the procurement of local catches, whereas the other localities were centers of trade. Fish from the trade sites show a mixed ancestry and are statistically differentiated from local fish populations. Moreover, Viking Age samples from Haithabu, Germany, are traced back to the North East Arctic Atlantic cod population that has supported the Lofoten fisheries of Norway for centuries. Our results resolve a long-standing controversial hypothesis and indicate that the marine resources of the North Atlantic Ocean were used to sustain an international demand for protein as far back as the Viking Age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28784790 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.