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59 records – page 1 of 6.

A 30-year history of MPAN case from Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290990
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
M Selikhova
E Fedotova
S Wiethoff
L V Schottlaender
S Klyushnikov
S N Illarioshkin
H Houlden
Author Affiliation
Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, UCL,1 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PJ, United Kingdom. Electronic address: m.selikhova@talk21.com.
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2017 Aug; 159:111-113
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Muscle Spasticity - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Optic Atrophy - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Russia
Spinocerebellar Ataxias - diagnostic imaging - genetics
Time Factors
Abstract
We present a patient with progressive spastic ataxia, with dystonia and anarthria undiagnosed until detailed genetic analysis revealed an MPAN mutation. Highlighting the worldwide MPAN distribution, a 30year history of absent diagnosis and the impact and cost saving of an early but detailed genetic analysis in complex progressive movement disorders, particularly the anarthric NBIA group.
PubMed ID
28641177 View in PubMed
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[A case of the tick (Ixodidae) hiperinvasion of the tundra vole in magadan environs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289887
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Author
N E Dokuchaev
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - parasitology
Fatal Outcome
Ixodes - pathogenicity - physiology
Male
Siberia
Tick Infestations - parasitology - pathology
Tundra
Abstract
A case of tundra vole death as a result its hyperinvasion by ticks Ixodes angustus on the northern periphery of the Asiatic range of the parasite is given.
PubMed ID
29401575 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Endotoxin Adsorption in Two Swedish Patients with Septic Shock.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299700
Source
Blood Purif. 2019; 47 Suppl 3:1-3
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Marcus Ewert Broman
Mikael Bodelsson
Author Affiliation
Perioperative and Intensive Care, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, marcus.broman@med.lu.se.
Source
Blood Purif. 2019; 47 Suppl 3:1-3
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Endotoxins - blood
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - blood - therapy
Hemofiltration - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Male
Shock, Septic - blood - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) from the outer Gram-negative bacterial wall can induce a harmful immunologic response, involving hemodynamic deprivation, and is one important motor driving the septic cascade. The positively charged poly-imine ethylene layer on the oXiris membrane is capable of adsorbing negatively charged endotoxin molecules and removing them from the blood compartment. Endotoxin is detrimental and should be removed from blood.
The adsorbable endotoxin fraction in blood arises from a tight balance between seeding from an infectious focus and removal by an overwhelmed immune system. The net sum of remaining endotoxin in blood is available for an adsorption process in the oXiris filter. Endotoxin data from 2 patients with severe Gram-negative septic shock and endotoxemia in this case series, speaks for a considerable share of the adsorption of the oXiris filter in the endotoxin net removal over time. Key Messages: Analysis of combined in vitro and in vivo data speaks for an effect of the oXiris filter in lowering endotoxin.
PubMed ID
30982027 View in PubMed
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An unusual case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae prosthetic joint infection from the Canadian Arctic: whole genome sequencing unable to identify a zoonotic source.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299701
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 25; 19(1):282
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Mar-25-2019
Author
Michael Groeschel
Taya Forde
Shannon Turvey
A Mark Joffe
Catherine Hui
Prenilla Naidu
Fabien Mavrot
Susan Kutz
Ameeta E Singh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. michael.groeschel@cls.ab.ca.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 25; 19(1):282
Date
Mar-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology
Arctic Regions
Arthritis, Infectious - transmission
Canada
Erysipelothrix
Erysipelothrix Infections - microbiology - transmission
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Prosthesis-Related Infections - microbiology - transmission
Whole Genome Sequencing
Zoonoses - microbiology - transmission
Abstract
Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a zoonotic pathogen that causes erysipeloid and is most frequently associated with exposure to domestic swine. Infection of native and prosthetic joints is a rarely reported manifestation.
We describe a case of E. rhusiopathiae prosthetic joint infection in a woman with a history of exposure to wild animals in the Canadian Arctic. Patient management involved a 1-stage surgical revision exchange with an antibiotic impregnated cement spacer and 6 weeks of intravenous penicillin G followed by 6?weeks of oral amoxicillin. Ten previously reported cases of E. rhusiopathiae joint infection are reviewed. Recent increases in mortality due to infection with this organism among host animal populations in the Canadian Arctic have generated concern regarding a potential increase in human infections. However, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of the organism was unable to identify a zoonotic origin for this case.
Consideration should be given to E. rhusiopathiae as a cause of joint infections if the appropriate epidemiologic and host risk factors exist. Expanded use of WGS in other potential animal hosts and environmental sources may provide important epidemiologic information in determining the source of human infections.
PubMed ID
30909869 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers with preserved thermal detection thresholds after repeated exposure to severe cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298484
Source
Brain Behav. 2018 03; 8(3):e009147
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
03-2018
Author
Thomas Krøigård
Martin Wirenfeldt
Toke K Svendsen
Søren H Sindrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology Odense University Hospital Odense C Denmark.
Source
Brain Behav. 2018 03; 8(3):e009147
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Greenland
Humans
Male
Nerve Fibers - physiology
Neurologic Examination - methods
Norway
Pain Threshold - physiology
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Skin - innervation
Abstract
Cold-induced peripheral neuropathy has been described in individuals exposed to severe cold resulting in pain, hypersensitivity to cold, hyperhidrosis, numbness, and skin changes. Nerve conduction studies and thermal detection thresholds are abnormal in symptomatic patients, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) in skin biopsies is reduced.
A 41-year-old male was included as a healthy subject in a study of the spontaneous variability of quantitative sensory testing (QST), nerve conduction studies (NCS), and IENFD. Unexpectedly, IENFD was significantly reduced, whereas the rest of the examination was normal except for reduced vibration detection threshold. The results were confirmed at follow-up examination. The subject had been repeatedly exposed to severe cold resulting in short lasting numbness and paresthesia while living in the eastern part of Greenland and the northern part of Norway.
Loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers caused by exposure to severe cold may be asymptomatic, and their function assessed by thermal detection thresholds may be preserved. This case illustrates that QST and IENFD are complementary tests and that subclinical cold-induced peripheral neuropathy may be prevalent in subjects living in or near polar regions which could have implications for the recruitment of healthy subjects.
PubMed ID
29541548 View in PubMed
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CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS IN A WILD FAR EASTERN LEOPARD ( PANTHERA PARDUS ORIENTALIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295305
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):170-174
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Nadezhda S Sulikhan
Martin Gilbert
Ekaterina Yu Blidchenko
Sergei V Naidenko
Galina V Ivanchuk
Tatiana Yu Gorpenchenko
Mikhail V Alshinetskiy
Elena I Shevtsova
John M Goodrich
John C M Lewis
Mikhail S Goncharuk
Olga V Uphyrkina
Vyatcheslav V Rozhnov
Sergey V Shedko
Denise McAloose
Dale G Miquelle
Author Affiliation
1 Federal Scientific Center of East Asian Terrestrial Biodiversity, Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt 100 letiya Vladivostok 159, Vladivostok, 690022, Russia.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):170-174
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Distemper - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Distemper Virus, Canine
Endangered Species
Female
Panthera - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The critically endangered population of Far Eastern leopards ( Panthera pardus orientalis) may number as few as 60 individuals and is at risk from stochastic processes such as infectious disease. During May 2015, a case of canine distemper virus (CDV) was diagnosed in a wild leopard exhibiting severe neurologic disease in the Russian territory of Primorskii Krai. Amplified sequences of the CDV hemagglutinin gene and phosphoprotein gene aligned within the Arctic-like clade of CDV, which includes viruses from elsewhere in Russia, China, Europe, and North America. Histologic examination of cerebral tissue revealed perivascular lymphoid cuffing and demyelination of the white matter consistent with CDV infection. Neutralizing antibodies against CDV were detected in archived serum from two wild Far Eastern leopards sampled during 1993-94, confirming previous exposure in the population. This leopard population is likely too small to maintain circulation of CDV, suggesting that infections arise from spillover from more-abundant domestic or wild carnivore reservoirs. Increasing the population size and establishment of additional populations of leopards would be important steps toward securing the future of this subspecies and reducing the risk posed by future outbreaks of CDV or other infectious diseases.
PubMed ID
29053427 View in PubMed
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Challenging cause of bullous eruption of the hands in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298560
Source
BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Nov 08; 2018:
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Bo Kristiansen
Luit Penninga
Jon Erik Fraes Diernaes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Nov 08; 2018:
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Australia
Citrus aurantiifolia - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Phototoxic - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Greenland - ethnology
Hand
Humans
Male
Pruritus - drug therapy - etiology
Skin
Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Phytophotodermatitis is caused by deposition of photosensitising compounds on the skin followed by ultraviolet exposure. We present an unusual case of a 29-year-old Australian male visiting Greenland who presented with severe itchy bullous eruption on his hands. The cause was a combination of exposure to lime fruit juice and prolonged sun exposure from the Arctic midnight sun.
PubMed ID
30413443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chlamydophila psittaci pneumonia associated to exposure to fulmar birds (Fulmaris glacialis) in the Faroe Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299739
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2018 Nov - Dec; 50(11-12):817-821
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Author
Marian Elsubeth Fossádal
Mansour Grand
Shahin Gaini
Author Affiliation
a Medical Department, Infectious Diseases Division , National Hospital Faroe Islands , Tórshavn , Faroe Islands.
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2018 Nov - Dec; 50(11-12):817-821
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Bird Diseases - microbiology
Birds
Chlamydophila psittaci - isolation & purification
Denmark
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - diagnostic imaging - microbiology
Psittacosis - diagnostic imaging - microbiology
Radiography
Zoonoses
Abstract
For more than 200 years people in the Faroe Islands have supplemented their food by hunting different species of wild birds in the Faroe Islands. Traditionally, juvenile fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) are caught at sea in late August. The fulmars may be infected or colonized with the bacterium Chlamydophila psittaci which may infect the hunter by the respiratory route and mostly presents as an atypical pneumonia, also called psittacosis or ornithosis or parrot fever. In the Faroe Islands it is called 'nátasjúka' meaning 'fulmar disease'. Historically, it has also been called 'September Pneumonia' in the Faroe Islands.
A case series with patients infected with Chlamydophila psittaci.
All four cases presented in this article occurred around the month of September. Improved hygiene measures during the last 50 years in handling the fulmar birds have led to a decline of verified psittacosis in the Faroe Islands. After the last two hunting seasons (2016-2017), four cases of psittacosis were diagnosed and treated in the Faroe Islands. Only nine cases of verified psittacosis have been reported to the Chief Medical Officer of the Faroe Islands during the last 27 years.
There is an association between catching and handling Fulmarus glacialis and human psittacosis disease in the Faroe Islands. Clinicians treating patients with contact with fulmars should be aware of this zoonotic disease.
PubMed ID
30241455 View in PubMed
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Contact allergy to moisturizers in Finland: the tale of the lurking tube in the medicine cupboard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295000
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Apr; 78(4):289-290
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Nicolas Kluger
Author Affiliation
Dermatology, Venereology, Allergology, Skin and Allergies Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, 00029, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Apr; 78(4):289-290
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology - physiopathology
Eczema - diagnosis - therapy
Emollients - adverse effects - chemistry
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
PubMed ID
29527730 View in PubMed
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[DENGUE FEVER IN RUSSIA: PROBLEMS OF DIAGNOSTICS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296720
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2017; 95(2):154-7
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Author
A A Nafeev
L V Il'mukhina
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2017; 95(2):154-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - methods
Dengue - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Patient Care Management - methods
Russia
Symptom Assessment - methods
Travel-Related Illness
Treatment Outcome
Vietnam
Abstract
The authors report clinical and laboratory data concerning a case of hemorrhagic dengue fever introduced to Ul’yanovsk by a tourist who had spent holiday in Vietnam. The clinical picture of the disease is described along with results of clinical and laboratory analyses. The approaches to the evaluation of the patient's health status during the period of primary examination and medical care as well as the problems that arose after the final diagnosis was established are discussed.
PubMed ID
30311755 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.