Skip header and navigation

Refine By

294492 records – page 1 of 29450.

Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136198
Source
BJOG. 2011 Jun;118(7):806-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
G. Tettamanti
D. Altman
N L Pedersen
R. Bellocco
I. Milsom
A N Iliadou
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. giorgio.tettamanti@ki.se
Source
BJOG. 2011 Jun;118(7):806-13
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coffee - adverse effects
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Nocturia - chemically induced
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Tea - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - chemically induced
Urinary Incontinence - chemically induced
Abstract
To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence.
Population-based study.
The Swedish Twin Register.
In 2005, all twins born between 1959 and 1985 in Sweden (n = 42,852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14,031).
The association between coffee and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as nocturia, was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals.
Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.98) compared with women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly the result of familial effects.
This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies.
Notes
Cites: Eur Urol. 2000 Jan;37(1):30-510671782
Cites: BJU Int. 2009 Aug;104(3):352-6019281467
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Nov;53(11):1150-711106889
Cites: Acta Clin Belg. 2002 Jul-Aug;57(4):207-1812462797
Cites: Urology. 2003 Jan;61(1):37-4912559262
Cites: BJOG. 2003 Mar;110(3):247-5412628262
Cites: BJU Int. 2003 Jul;92(1):69-7712823386
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Oct;83(10):978-8215453898
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Oct 16;329(7471):889-9115485965
Cites: J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1990 May;15(5):685-911692926
Cites: Br J Urol. 1990 Dec;66(6):613-42265333
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 1993 Mar;2(3):317-228252153
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1996 May;87(5 Pt 1):715-218677073
Cites: Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 1999;10(1):22-810207763
Cites: J Urol. 2005 Jul;174(1):187-915947624
Cites: BJU Int. 2006 Sep;98 Suppl 1:1-5; discussion 6-716911592
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2006 Dec;9(6):875-8217254424
Cites: Eur Urol. 2008 Oct;54(4):918-2218155350
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Jul;96(1):85-910862848
PubMed ID
21401855 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of five years versus two years of specialised assertive intervention for first episode psychosis - OPUS II: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136300
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marianne Melau
Pia Jeppesen
Anne Thorup
Mette Bertelsen
Lone Petersen
Christian Gluud
Gertrud Krarup
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark. marianne.melau@regionh.dk
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cognitive Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Family Therapy
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Research Design
Social Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish OPUS I trial randomized 547 patients with first-episode psychosis to a two-year early-specialised assertive treatment programme (OPUS) versus standard treatment. The two years OPUS treatment had significant positive effects on psychotic and negative symptoms, secondary substance abuse, treatment adherence, lower dosage of antipsychotic medication, and a higher treatment satisfaction. However, three years after end of the OPUS treatment, the positive clinical effects were not sustained, except that OPUS-treated patients were significantly less likely to be institutionalised compared with standard-treated patients. The major objective of the OPUS II trial is to evaluate the effects of five years of OPUS treatment versus two years of OPUS treatment.
The OPUS II trial is designed as a randomized, open label, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Based on our sample size estimation, 400 patients treated in OPUS for two years will be randomized to further three years of OPUS treatment versus standard treatment. The specialized assertive OPUS treatment consists of three core elements: assertive community treatment, psycho-educational family treatment, and social skills training.
It has been hypothesized that there is a critical period from onset up to five years, which represents a window of opportunity where a long-term course can be influenced. Extending the specialized assertive OPUS treatment up to five years may allow the beneficial effects to continue beyond the high-risk period, through consolidation of improved social and functional outcome.
Clinical Trial.gov NCT00914238.
Notes
Cites: J Psychol. 2005 Sep;139(5):439-5716285214
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Sep 17;331(7517):60216141449
Cites: Psychol Med. 2008 Aug;38(8):1157-6618447961
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;65(7):762-7118606949
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2010 Jan;116(1):27-3419897341
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010;10:9020920306
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2000 Spring;30(1):34-4910782717
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2000;(407):63-711261644
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(4):229-3511839112
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2004;30(2):279-9315279046
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Jul 31;329(7460):26115213108
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1976 Jun;33(6):766-71938196
Cites: Eval Program Plann. 1982;5(3):233-710259963
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1987;334:1-1002887090
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990 Jun;47(6):589-932190539
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1992 Jan;49(1):63-721728252
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1994 Aug;62(4):670-87962870
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1995 May;52(5):352-607726715
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1997 Feb;44(1):82-49062767
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Sep;155(9):1196-2019734542
Cites: Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1998;172(33):53-99764127
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Oct 31;317(7167):1181-49794850
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-710514943
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Nov 6;329(7474):106715485934
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1960 Feb;23:56-6214399272
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2005 Jan;31(1):5-1915888422
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;62(9):975-8316143729
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;189:381-217012664
PubMed ID
21392377 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Scandinavian Propaten(®) trial - 1-year patency of PTFE vascular prostheses with heparin-bonded luminal surfaces compared to ordinary pure PTFE vascular prostheses - a randomised clinical controlled multi-centre trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136455
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 May;41(5):668-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
J S Lindholt
B. Gottschalksen
N. Johannesen
D. Dueholm
H. Ravn
E D Christensen
B. Viddal
T. Flørenes
G. Pedersen
M. Rasmussen
M. Carstensen
N. Grøndal
H. Fasting
Author Affiliation
Vascular Research Unit, Department of Vascular Surgery, Viborg Hospital, 8800 Viborg, Denmark. jes.s.lindholt@viborg.rm.dk
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 May;41(5):668-73
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anastomosis, Surgical - instrumentation
Anticoagulants - pharmacology
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Femoral Artery - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Heparin - pharmacology
Humans
Male
Peripheral Arterial Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Popliteal Artery - surgery
Prosthesis Design
Retrospective Studies
Scandinavia
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Vascular Patency - physiology
Abstract
To compare 1-year potencies' of heparin-bonded PTFE [(Hb-PTFE) (Propaten(®))] grafts with those of ordinary polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) grafts in a blinded, randomised, clinically controlled, multi-centre study.
Eleven Scandinavian centres enrolled 569 patients with chronic functional or critical lower limb ischaemia who were scheduled to undergo femoro-femoral bypass or femoro-poplitaeal bypass. The patients were randomised 1:1 stratified by centre. Patency was assessed by duplex ultrasound scanning. A total of 546 patients (96%) completed the study with adequate follow-up.
Perioperative bleeding was, on average, 370 ml with PTFE grafts and 399 ml with Heparin-bonded PTFE grafts (p = 0.32). Overall, primary patency after 1 year was 86.4% for Hb-PTFE grafts and 79.9% for PTFE grafts (OR = 0.627, 95% CI: 0.398; 0.989, p = 0.043). Secondary patency was 88% in Hb-PTFE grafts and 81% in PTFE grafts (OR = 0.569 (0.353; 0.917, p = 0.020)). Subgroup analyses revealed that significant reduction in risk (50%) was observed when Hb-PTFE was used for femoro-poplitaeal bypass (OR = 0.515 (0.281; 0.944, p = 0.030)), and a significant reduction in risk (50%) was observed with Hb-PTFE in cases with critical ischaemia (OR = 0.490 (0.249; 0.962, p = 0.036)).
The Hb-PTFE graft significantly reduced the overall risk of primary graft failure by 37%. Risk reduction was 50% in femoro-poplitaeal bypass cases and in cases with critical ischaemia.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 May;41(5):674-521353605
PubMed ID
21376643 View in PubMed
Less detail

A population-based validation of the prognostic model PREDICT for early breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136520
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2011 May;37(5):411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
G C Wishart
C D Bajdik
E M Azzato
E. Dicks
D C Greenberg
J. Rashbass
C. Caldas
P D P Pharoah
Author Affiliation
Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 2QQ, UK.
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2011 May;37(5):411-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - pathology - therapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - mortality
Carcinoma, Lobular - diagnosis - mortality
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Internet
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Neoplasm Staging
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
ROC Curve
Registries
Survival Rate
Abstract
Predict (www.predict.nhs.uk) is a prognostication and treatment benefit tool developed using UK cancer registry data. The aim of this study was to compare the 10-year survival estimates from Predict with observed 10-year outcome from a British Columbia dataset and to compare the estimates with those generated by Adjuvant! (www.adjuvantonline.com).
The analysis was based on data from 3140 patients with early invasive breast cancer diagnosed in British Columbia, Canada, from 1989-1993. Demographic, pathologic, staging and treatment data were used to predict 10-year overall survival (OS) and breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) using Adjuvant! and Predict models. Predicted outcomes from both models were then compared with observed outcomes.
Calibration of both models was excellent. The difference in total number of deaths estimated by Predict was 4.1 percent of observed compared to 0.7 percent for Adjuvant!. The total number of breast cancer specific deaths estimated by Predict was 3.4 percent of observed compared to 6.7 percent for Adjuvant! Both models also discriminate well with similar AUC for Predict and Adjuvant! respectively for both OS (0.709 vs 0.712) and BCSS (0.723 vs 0.727). Neither model performed well in women aged 20-35.
In summary Predict provided accurate overall and breast cancer specific survival estimates in the British Columbia dataset that are comparable with outcome estimates from Adjuvant! Both models appear well calibrated with similar model discrimination. This study provides further validation of Predict as an effective predictive tool following surgery for invasive breast cancer.
PubMed ID
21371853 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prognostic significance and tumor biology of regional lymph node disease in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136646
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2011 Apr 1;29(10):1304-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011
Author
David A Rodeberg
Norbert Garcia-Henriquez
Elizabeth R Lyden
Elai Davicioni
David M Parham
Stephen X Skapek
Andrea A Hayes-Jordan
Sarah S Donaldson
Kenneth L Brown
Timothy J Triche
William H Meyer
Douglas S Hawkins
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. rodebergd@ecu.edu
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2011 Apr 1;29(10):1304-11
Date
Apr-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Infant
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Rhabdomyosarcoma, Alveolar - genetics - mortality - secondary - therapy
Rhabdomyosarcoma, Embryonal - genetics - mortality - secondary - therapy
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Regional lymph node disease (RLND) is a component of the risk-based treatment stratification in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of RLND to prognosis for patients with RMS.
Patient characteristics and survival outcomes for patients enrolled onto Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV (N = 898, 1991 to 1997) were evaluated among the following three patient groups: nonmetastatic patients with clinical or pathologic negative nodes (N0, 696 patients); patients with clinical or pathologic positive nodes (N1, 125 patients); and patients with a single site of metastatic disease (77 patients).
Outcomes for patients with nonmetastatic alveolar N0 RMS were significantly better than for patients with N1 RMS (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 73% v 43%, respectively; 5-year overall survival [OS], 80% v 46%, respectively; P
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2008 Feb;44(3):427-3118215514
Cites: Am J Pathol. 2009 Feb;174(2):550-6419147825
Cites: Cancer Res. 2006 Jul 15;66(14):6936-4616849537
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2004 Dec 1;22(23):4787-9415570080
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1995 Aug;13(8):2123-397636557
Cites: Med Pediatr Oncol. 1991;19(2):89-952011101
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1977 Jan;35(1):1-39831755
Cites: Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Jun 1;10(11):3629-3815173069
Cites: Genome Biol. 2003;4(5):P312734009
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2003 Jan 1;21(1):78-8412506174
Cites: J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2001 May;23(4):215-2011846299
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2001 Nov 1;51(3):718-2811597814
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2001 Jun 15;19(12):3091-10211408506
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2000 Feb;35(2):317-2110693687
Cites: Odontology. 2008 Jul;96(1):38-4318661203
Cites: Oncogene. 2008 Nov 20;27(51):6607-2218679425
Cites: Nat Protoc. 2009;4(1):44-5719131956
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2008 May 10;26(14):2384-918467730
Cites: Cancer. 2010 Apr 15;116(8):1953-6320186824
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2006 Aug 20;24(24):3844-5116921036
PubMed ID
21357792 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genotype-environment interactions in microsatellite stable/microsatellite instability-low colorectal cancer: results from a genome-wide association study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136653
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 May;20(5):758-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Jane C Figueiredo
Juan Pablo Lewinger
Chi Song
Peter T Campbell
David V Conti
Christopher K Edlund
Dave J Duggan
Jagadish Rangrej
Mathieu Lemire
Thomas Hudson
Brent Zanke
Michelle Cotterchio
Steven Gallinger
Mark Jenkins
John Hopper
Robert Haile
Polly Newcomb
John Potter
John A Baron
Loic Le Marchand
Graham Casey
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. janefigu@usc.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 May;20(5):758-66
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Environment
Female
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Male
Microsatellite Instability
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Quantitative Trait Loci
Risk factors
Abstract
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the identification of a number of common susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, none of these GWAS have considered gene-environment (G × E) interactions. Therefore, it is unclear whether current hits are modified by environmental exposures or whether there are additional hits whose effects are dependent on environmental exposures.
We conducted a systematic search for G × E interactions using genome wide data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry that included 1,191 cases of microsatellite stable (MSS) or microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L) CRC and 999 controls genotyped using either the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip. We tested for interactions between genotypes and 14 environmental factors using 3 methods: a traditional case-control test, a case-only test, and the recently proposed 2-step method by Murcray and colleagues. All potentially significant findings were replicated in the ARCTIC Study.
No G × E interactions were identified that reached genome-wide significance by any of the 3 methods. When analyzing previously reported susceptibility loci, 7 significant G × E interactions were found at a 5% significance level. We investigated these 7 interactions in an independent sample and none of the interactions were replicated.
Identifying G × E interactions will present challenges in a GWAS setting. Our power calculations illustrate the need for larger sample sizes; however, as CRC is a heterogeneous disease, a tradeoff between increasing sample size and heterogeneity needs to be considered.
The results from this first genome-wide analysis of G × E in CRC identify several challenges, which may be addressed by large consortium efforts.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb 15;169(4):497-50419074774
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 May;40(5):623-3018372905
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Oct;18(10):2745-5019755657
Cites: Cancer Biol Ther. 2007 Jul;6(7):1143-717630503
Cites: Genet Epidemiol. 2008 Nov;32(7):615-2618473390
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Feb 15;361(9357):567-7112598142
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Mar 17;102(6):391-40020208017
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2009 Jan;136(1):131-719010329
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Jan 15;169(2):219-2619022827
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Dec;40(12):1426-3519011631
Cites: Stat Med. 1994 Jan 30;13(2):153-628122051
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Apr 27;293(16):1979-8515855431
Cites: Hum Hered. 2007;63(2):111-917283440
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 May;39(5):638-4417401364
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Aug;39(8):989-9417618283
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Aug;39(8):984-817618284
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Sep;81(3):559-7517701901
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Nov;39(11):1315-717934461
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Nov;16(11):2331-4317982118
Cites: Cancer Res. 2007 Dec 1;67(23):11128-3218056436
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jan;40(1):26-818084292
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 May;40(5):631-718372901
Cites: Genetics. 2000 Jun;155(2):945-5910835412
PubMed ID
21357381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Type 2 diabetes incidence and socio-economic position: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136873
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):804-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Emilie Agardh
Peter Allebeck
Johan Hallqvist
Tahereh Moradi
Anna Sidorchuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. emilie.agardh@ki.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):804-18
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - physiopathology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - trends
Poverty
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
World Health
Abstract
We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, the first to our knowledge, summarizing and quantifying the published evidence on associations between type 2 diabetes incidence and socio-economic position (SEP) (measured by educational level, occupation and income) worldwide and when sub-divided into high-, middle- and low-income countries.
Relevant case-control and cohort studies published between 1966 and January 2010 were searched in PubMed and EMBASE using the keywords: diabetes vs educational level, occupation or income. All identified citations were screened by one author, and two authors independently evaluated and extracted data from relevant publications. Risk estimates from individual studies were pooled using random-effects models quantifying the associations.
Out of 5120 citations, 23 studies, including 41 measures of association, were found to be relevant. Compared with high educational level, occupation and income, low levels of these determinants were associated with an overall increased risk of type 2 diabetes; [relative risk (RR)?=?1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-1.51], (RR?=?1.31, 95% CI: 1.09-1.57) and (RR?=?1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.88), respectively. The increased risks were independent of the income levels of countries, although based on limited data in middle- and low-income countries.
The risk of getting type 2 diabetes was associated with low SEP in high-, middle- and low-income countries and overall. The strength of the associations was consistent in high-income countries, whereas there is a strong need for further investigation in middle- and low-income countries.
PubMed ID
21335614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased risk of lung cancer in men with tuberculosis in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136876
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Apr;20(4):672-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Meredith S Shiels
Demetrius Albanes
Jarmo Virtamo
Eric A Engels
Author Affiliation
Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7059, Rockville, MD 20852, USA. shielsms@mail.nih.gov
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Apr;20(4):672-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - therapeutic use
Abstract
Lung cancer and tuberculosis cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculosis may increase lung cancer risk through substantial and prolonged pulmonary inflammation. However, prospective data on tuberculosis and lung cancer risk are limited.
Our study included 29,133 Finnish male smokers followed prospectively in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (1985-2005). Lung cancers were identified through linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, and hospital-treated tuberculosis cases were ascertained from the National Hospital Discharge Register. We assessed the association between tuberculosis and lung cancer risk with proportional hazards regression models, adjusting for age and cigarette smoking.
Forty-four lung cancer cases occurred among 273 men with tuberculosis (incidence rate = 1,786 per 100,000 person-years). Tuberculosis was associated with a two-fold elevation in lung cancer risk (HR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.46-2.65) with significant associations observed for both incident (HR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.42-2.96) and prevalent tuberculosis (HR = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.09-3.02). Lung cancer risk was greatest in the 2-year window after tuberculosis diagnosis (HR = 5.01; 95% CI = 2.96-8.48) but remained elevated at longer latencies (HR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.07-2.20). Though tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 3.71), adenocarcinoma (HR = 1.71), small cell carcinoma (HR = 1.72), and lung cancer of other (HR = 1.23) and unknown histologies (HR = 1.35), only the association for squamous cell carcinoma was statistically significant.
Tuberculosis is associated with increased lung cancer risk in male smokers.
Our results add to the growing body of evidence implicating chronic inflammation and pulmonary scarring in the etiology of lung cancer.
Notes
Cites: Lung Cancer. 2004 Aug;45 Suppl 2:S3-915552776
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2005 Mar-Apr;55(2):74-10815761078
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Oct;14(10):2296-30216214908
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Feb 26;167(4):335-4217325294
Cites: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2008 Apr;8(4):605-1518402527
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2008 Nov 24;168(21):2326-32; discussion 233219029496
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Mar 1;124(5):1183-719058197
Cites: Oncogene. 2009 Apr 30;28(17):1928-3819330024
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Jul;20(5):757-6319169896
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Dec 15;125(12):2936-4419521963
Cites: Lung Cancer. 2010 Apr;68(1):20-619545930
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Mar;19(3):716-2120200440
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):853-811075875
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002 Jun 5;94(11):826-3512048270
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2002;41(4):381-812234031
Cites: Clin Lung Cancer. 2003 Jul;5(1):46-6214596704
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Oct;15(8):819-2715456995
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Apr 14;330(15):1029-358127329
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-108205268
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jan 1;149(1):13-209883789
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Sep 15;150(6):632-4110490003
PubMed ID
21335509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Economic evaluation of caspofungin versus liposomal amphotericin B for empirical antifungal therapy in patients with persistent fever and neutropenia in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136917
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2011 Jul;43(6-7):504-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Shalini Naik
Johan Lundberg
Ritesh Kumar
Jan Sjolin
Jeroen P Jansen
Author Affiliation
Mapi Values, Boston, USA.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2011 Jul;43(6-7):504-14
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amphotericin B - administration & dosage - economics
Antifungal Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Double-Blind Method
Echinocandins - administration & dosage - economics
Fever of Unknown Origin - drug therapy
Humans
Neutropenia - drug therapy
Quality of Life
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of caspofungin versus liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) for empirical antifungal therapy in patients with persistent fever and neutropenia in Sweden.
With a decision-analytic model, the expected direct costs, life-years lost and quality adjusted life-years lost were estimated for an average patient in Sweden. Efficacy/tolerability data were obtained from analysis of a randomized, double-blind multinational trial. Life expectancy, medical resource use and unit costs data were gathered from the literature and expert opinion. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the impact of uncertainty in data on outcomes.
The direct cost with caspofungin amounted to 233,851 SEK (95% uncertainty interval 225,091-242,210) and with L-AmB to 271,921 SEK (262,935-281,363), a difference of 38,070 SEK (31,745-44,811) favouring caspofungin. Treatment with caspofungin resulted in 0.25 (0.01-0.55) quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) saved in comparison to L-AmB. Given the uncertainty in the estimates there is a >95% probability that caspofungin is economically dominant over L-AmB, i.e. cost-saving and QALY-saving.
Given the underlying assumptions and data used, caspofungin is expected to be cost-effective with at least comparable outcomes compared to L-AmB for the empirical treatment of patients with suspected fungal infections in Sweden.
PubMed ID
21332286 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rutgers alcohol problem index scores at age 18 predict alcohol dependence diagnoses 7 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137019
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 May;35(5):1011-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Danielle M Dick
Fazil Aliev
Richard Viken
Jaakko Kaprio
Richard J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 May;35(5):1011-4
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - genetics
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires - standards
Twins
Abstract
The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI) is widely used to assess adolescent drinking-related problems. We asked how well RAPI, administered in late adolescence, predicts alcohol diagnoses at age 25 in a 7-year follow-up.
At age 18, a population-based sample of Finnish twins completed RAPI by postal questionnaire; 597 (300 male) twins, from pairs discordant and concordant for age 18 RAPI scores, were interviewed at age 25 with the SSAGA, yielding DSM-IIIR diagnoses. Polychoric correlations between RAPI and alcohol diagnoses and symptoms, the area under the response operator characteristic (ROC) curve, and the odds ratio of outcome diagnosis per unit change in adolescent RAPI were analyzed. Twin pairs discordant for both adolescent RAPI and adult diagnoses permitted within-family replications for the full sample and separately by sex.
Nearly half the interviewed twins met diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependency (46.2%) or abuse (1.5%). Age 18 RAPI scores significantly correlated with diagnoses (0.52) and symptom counts (0.55). ROC analysis found a 74% probability that adolescent RAPI scores will be higher among those with an alcohol diagnosis at age 25 than for those without. The odds ratio of outcome alcohol diagnosis per unit increase in adolescent 18 RAPI exceeded 10.0. Within-family comparisons of 117 twin pairs discordant for both age 18 RAPI and age 25 alcohol diagnoses replicated the between-family associations. In both between-family and within-family analyses, RAPI was more predictive of alcohol diagnoses among females.
Our results offer evidence, including that from informative comparisons of co-twins discordant for both predictor and outcome, that RAPI scores in late adolescence robustly predict alcohol diagnoses in early adulthood. Accordingly, our results also provide new evidence that one pathway to problem drinking in early adulthood is a direct one from problem drinking in adolescence.
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 Jul;68(4):597-60617568966
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Feb;10(1):25-3217539362
Cites: Addiction. 2008 May;103 Suppl 1:48-6818426540
Cites: Addiction. 2008 May;103 Suppl 1:84-9918426542
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 May;62(3):370-8011414347
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2000 Sep;11(5):409-1311228913
Cites: Addiction. 2008 May;103 Suppl 1:100-818426543
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2002 May-Jun;37(3):297-30312003922
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2002 Aug;30(4):419-3012108769
Cites: Addict Behav. 2003 Apr;28(3):551-912628626
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2004 Jun;72(3):434-4715279527
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1989 Jan;50(1):30-72927120
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1994 Mar;55(2):149-588189735
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jan;59(1):32-429498313
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1999 Mar;13:63-7410225489
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Dec;99(12):1520-815585043
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2004 Oct;28(10):1541-815597087
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2006 Dec;18(4):402-1417154761
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Feb 20;115(7):928-3517309939
Cites: Addict Behav. 2007 Jul;32(7):1519-2517236724
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Oct;61(10):902-717873228
PubMed ID
21323682 View in PubMed
Less detail

294492 records – page 1 of 29450.