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High serum alpha-tocopherol, albumin, selenium and cholesterol, and low mortality from coronary heart disease in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302227
Source
Journal of Internal Medicine. 1995 Jan;237(1):49-54.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
Luoma, P.V.
Nayha, S.
Hassi, J.
Source
Journal of Internal Medicine. 1995 Jan;237(1):49-54.
Date
1995
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Sami (Lapp)
Albumin
Alpha-tocopherol
Antioxidant
CHD
Cholesterol
Diet
Ethnic group
Mortality
Selenium
Abstract
Objectives. The mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) is exceptionally low in northernmost Finland, the Sámi (formerly known as Lapp) area. To clarify the reasons for this, the levels of serum cholesterol, other classic risk factors, and major antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol, retinol, albumin and selenium were determined in males living in the low-mortality area and in a reference area.
Design. A health survey amongst reindeer herdsmen living in the three northernmost communes of Finland (the Sámi area) and in the six neighbouring communities to the south (the reference area). The mortality from CHD in the two areas was determined from death certificates issued during the period 1981–1990.
Subjects. A total of 350 participants of the health survey, mean age 46 (SD 14) years.
Results. The mortality from CHD was 17% lower in the Sámi area than in the reference area [95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference: 4–29]. Subjects living in the low-mortality area showed higher serum-lipid-adjusted alpha-tocopherol (18.4 vs. 16.1 µmol L-1; 95% CI for difference: 0.7–3.9; P
Notes
The results from this study were presented at the Third International Symposium on Multiple Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease, Florence, Italy; 6–9 July 1994.
PubMed ID
7830030 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory fitness of finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302313
Source
International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2007 Oct;28(10):853-9. Epub 2007 Apr 13.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tammelin T
Remes J
Kujala V
Oksa J
Näyhä S
Zitting P
Järvelin MR
Source
International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2007 Oct;28(10):853-9. Epub 2007 Apr 13.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling
Cardiovascular System
Cohort Studies
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Physiology
Methods
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Oxygen
Consumption
Physical Fitness
Respiratory System
Abstract
We evaluated the accuracy of a submaximal cycle ergometer test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents and provided population-based reference values. In a health study of the Northern Finland birth cohort born in 1985 - 1986 (NFBC 1986), cardiorespiratory fitness of 5375 males and females aged 15 to 16 years was measured by a submaximal cycle ergometer test by using a two-stage exercise protocol designed for this survey. A total of 4903 subjects performed two work stages. Maximal workload and peak oxygen consumption were calculated on the basis of heart rate responses by the WHO extrapolation method. An additional 472 subjects were able to finish only one work stage. For them, peak oxygen uptake was calculated by the Astrand nomogram. To evaluate the accuracy of submaximal testing, a validation sample of 90 subjects carried out both a submaximal test and a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of peak oxygen uptake. The WHO method proved to estimate peak oxygen uptake with reasonable accuracy. The Astrand nomogram method overestimated peak oxygen uptake considerably, and therefore a new single-stage regression method was applied to calculate maximal workload and peak oxygen consumption. Reference values of cardiorespiratory fitness were provided for 2690 males and 2685 females aged 15 to 16 years.
PubMed ID
17436191 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism is associated with more cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302314
Source
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2017 Jul;129:116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.04.022. Epub 2017 May 4.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Ikäheimo TM
Jokelainen J
Hassi J
Hiltunen L
Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S
Laatikainen T
Jousilahti P
Peltonen M
Moilanen L
Saltevo J
Näyhä S
Source
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2017 Jul;129:116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.04.022. Epub 2017 May 4.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Cardiovascular diseases
Epidemiology
Cold Temperature
Metabolism
Adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Complications
Female
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
AIMS: Diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism cause metabolic, neural and circulatory disturbances that may predispose to adverse cooling and related symptoms during the cold season. This study assessed the prevalence of cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms in the general population according to glycaemic status.
METHODS: The study population consisted of 2436 men and 2708 women aged 45-74years who participated in the National FINRISK cold sub-studies in 2002 and 2007. A questionnaire assessed cold-related symptoms (respiratory, cardiac, peripheral circulation). Glycaemic status was determined based on fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance tests or reported diagnosis of diabetes and categorized into normal glucose metabolism, impaired fasting blood glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, screening-detected type 2 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.
RESULTS: Type 2 diabetes was associated with increased odds for cold-related dyspnoea [Adjusted OR 1.72 (95% CI, 1.28-2.30)], chest pain [2.10 (1.32-3.34)] and respiratory symptoms [1.85 (1.44-2.38)] compared with normal glucose metabolism. Screened type 2 diabetes showed increased OR for cold-related dyspnoea [1.36 (1.04-1.77)], cough [1.41 (1.06-1.87)] and cardiac symptoms [1.51 (1.04-2.20)]. Worsening of glycaemic status was associated with increased odds for cold-related dyspnoea (from 1.16 in impaired fasting glucose to 1.72 in type 2 diabetes, P=0.000), cough (1.02-1.27, P=0.032), chest pain (1.28-2.10, P=0.006), arrhythmias (0.87-1.74, P=0.020), cardiac (1.11-1.99, P=0.000), respiratory (1.14-1.84, P=0.000) and all symptoms (1.05-1.66, P=0.003).
CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with diabetes and pre-diabetes experience more cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms and need instructions for proper protection from cold weather to reduce adverse health effects.
PubMed ID
28521195 View in PubMed
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Early Respiratory Infections and Dental Caries in the First 27 Years of Life: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302315
Source
PLoS One. 2016 Dec 9;11(12):e0168141. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0168141. eCollection 2016.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Rantala AK
Mehtonen IT
Jaakkola MS
Näyhä S
Hugg TT
Jaakkola JJ
Source
PLoS One. 2016 Dec 9;11(12):e0168141. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0168141. eCollection 2016.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental caries
Complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Respiratory tract infections
Abstract
Early-life respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and dental caries are among the most common infectious diseases worldwide. The relations between early RTIs and development of caries in permanent teeth have not been studied earlier. We assessed childhood RTIs as potential predictors of caries in young adulthood in a 20-year prospective population-based cohort study (The Espoo Cohort Study). Information on lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) that had required hospitalization was retrieved from the National Hospital Discharge Registry (n = 1623). Additional information on LRTIs and upper RTIs (URTIs) was assessed based on the questionnaire reports that covered the preceding 12 months. Caries was measured as the number of teeth with fillings (i.e. filled teeth, FT) reported in the 20-year follow-up questionnaire. The absolute and relative excess numbers of FT were estimated applying negative binomial regression. The mean number of FT in young adulthood was 1.4 greater among subjects who had experienced LRTIs requiring hospitalization before the age of 2 years (SD 4.8) compared to those without any such infections (SD 3.4), and the adjusted relative excess number of FT was 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.2). LRTIs up to 7 years were associated with an absolute increase of 0.9 in the mean FT number, the adjusted relative excess being 1.3 (1.0-1.8). Also the questionnaire-based LRTIs (adjusted relative excess 1.3; 95% CI 0.9-1.8) and URTIs (adjusted relative excess 1.4, 1.0-1.8) before the age of 2 years predicted higher occurrence of FT. Findings suggest that early RTIs have a role in the development of dental caries in permanent teeth.
PubMed ID
27936203 View in PubMed
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Lunar cycle in homicides: a population-based time series study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302316
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 Jan 15;9(1):e022759. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022759.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2019
Author
Näyhä S
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 Jan 15;9(1):e022759. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022759.
Date
2019
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Homicide
Lunar
Time series
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To test whether homicides in Finland vary according to moon phases. DESIGN: A time series study. SETTING: Finland. PARTICIPANTS: 6808 homicides committed in 1961-2014. OUTCOME: Daily numbers of homicides. METHOD: The daily numbers of homicides were related to eight moon phases and the illuminated percentage of the moon disc using negative binomial regression. To identify lunar patterns, piecewise linear terms of lunar days were used, together with changes from one moon phase to another. Homicides were similarly regressed on quintiles of the illuminated percentage of the moon disc. A periodic term of length 29.53 days was included to detect cyclic patterns. The results were adjusted for sex, age, secular trend, distance from the moon, seasons, weekday, major holidays and temperature. RESULTS: During the full moon, 15% less homicides were committed than during the new moon (RR 0.85; 95%?CI 0.77 to 0.94) and 86% less during the lightest quintile of illumination compared with the darkest quintile (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.50). Adjustments did not change the results. Piecewise linear regressions showed a significant decline in homicides at the full moon and a rise thereafter. The full moon drop in homicides was directionally similar for seasons, weekdays, sex, age and time periods, and it was particularly pronounced in the early part of period studied (1961-1974). Periodic regression showed a regular cyclic pattern of length 29.53 days (p~0.035). CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to current scientific opinion, an association exists between moon phases and homicides, and contrary to what has been previously assumed, homicides declined during the full moon, especially in earlier decades. However, the causality of the association remains elusive.
PubMed ID
30647032 View in PubMed
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Snowmobile driving and symptoms of the locomotive organs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302317
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994;53 Suppl 3:41-4.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

SKARP - A population-based cohort study of childhood food-associated symptoms perceived by parents and food allergies diagnosed by physicians: Design, methods and participation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101194
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Pyrhönen, K
Läärä, E
Kaila, M
Hiltunen, L
Näyhä, S
Author Affiliation
South Karelia District of Social and Health Services, Lappeenranta, Finland
Unit of General Practice, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Paediatric Research Centre, Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
Health Centre of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Finland
Finnish Institution of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):194-202
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Food allergy
Food Hypersensitivity
Participation rate
Population
Test
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few epidemiological studies exist on food-associated symptoms and allergies in large unselected child populations. AIMS: To describe the design, methods and participation rate of the South Karelian Allergy Research Project (SKARP), a population-based epidemiological study on food-associated symptoms and physician-diagnosed food allergies. METHODS: The study population of 5,973 children born between 2001 and 2006 and resident in the province of South Karelia, Finland, was identified from the nationwide population register. The parents received a questionnaire to be returned at their child's annual visit to the child health clinic, where supplementary interviews were performed. Results of allergy tests (skin prick tests, immunoglobulin E antibodies and open food challenges) performed on participants and non-participants were collected from the relevant health care units in the area. RESULTS: Participation rates in the questionnaire study were 54% (644/1,194) among the parents of neonates and 69% (3308/4,779) among those of the children aged 1 to 4 years. Cooperation with the child health clinics and mailing of a reminder questionnaire improved participation by 8 and 10 percentage points, respectively. The final participation rate seemed to be unaffected by whether the child had or had not been tested for suspected allergy. CONCLUSIONS: A reasonably good participation rate and almost complete coverage of allergy tests were achieved thanks to successful cooperation with the child health clinics and test laboratories. This baseline study forms a representative database to estimate the occurrence of food-associated symptoms, physician-diagnosed food allergies and allergy testing in the general population.
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Heat related mortality in warm and cold regions of Europe: observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95978
Source
BMJ. 2000 Sep 16;321(7262):670-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-2000
Author
Keatinge W R
Donaldson G C
Cordioli E.
Martinelli M.
Kunst A E
Mackenbach J P
Nayha S.
Vuori I.
Author Affiliation
Medical Sciences Building, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London E1 4NS, UK. w.r.keatinge@qmw.ac.uk
Source
BMJ. 2000 Sep 16;321(7262):670-3
Date
Sep-16-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Climate
England - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Heat Stroke - mortality
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Netherlands - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess heat related mortalities in relation to climate within Europe. DESIGN: Observational population study. Setting: North Finland, south Finland, Baden-Württemberg, Netherlands, London, north Italy, and Athens. SUBJECTS: People aged 65-74. Main outcome measures: Mortalities at temperatures above, below, and within each region's temperature band of minimum mortality. RESULTS: Mortality was lowest at 14.3-17.3 degrees C in north Finland but at 22.7-25.7 degrees C in Athens. Overall the 3 degrees C minimum mortality temperature bands were significantly higher in regions with higher than lower mean summer temperatures (P=0.027). This was not due to regional differences in wind speeds, humidity, or rain. As a result, regions with hot summers did not have significantly higher annual heat related mortality per million population than cold regions at temperatures above these bands. Mean annual heat related mortalities were 304 (95% confidence interval 126 to 482) in North Finland, 445 (59 to 831) in Athens, and 40 (13 to 68) in London. Cold related mortalities were 2457 (1130 to 3786), 2533 (965 to 4101), and 3129 (2319 to 3939) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Populations in Europe have adjusted successfully to mean summer temperatures ranging from 13.5 degrees C to 24.1 degrees C, and can be expected to adjust to global warming predicted for the next half century with little sustained increase in heat related mortality. Active measures to accelerate adjustment to hot weather could minimise temporary rises in heat related mortality, and measures to maintain protection against cold in winter could permit substantial reductions in overall mortality as temperatures rise.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2000 Sep 16;321(7262):650-110987751
PubMed ID
10987770 View in PubMed
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Environmental temperature and mortality

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6598
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):451-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Näyhä, S
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland. simo.nayha@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):451-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Age Factors
Air Pollution
Adverse effects
Arctic Regions
Physiology
Body Temperature Regulation
Cardiovascular diseases
Mortality
Cold Temperature
Environment
Female
Finland
Epidemiology
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
In Finland, mortality increases steeply in autumn, reaches a peak during the Christhmas holidays and declines slowly towards a trough in August. The relative excess in daily mortality (peak vs. trough) is 30% for coronary heart disease, 40% for cerebral vascular accidents and 90% for diseases of the respiratory organs. There is a secondary peak in Midsummer, especially in coronary deaths of working aged men. Mortality is lowest at mean daily temperature of +14 degrees C, and it increases slowly with falling temperature and steeply with increasing temperature. An estimated 2000-3000 extra deaths occur in Finland during the cold season, most of which are people aged 65 years and over but 20% at working age. The number of people dying from high temperatures (over +14 degrees C) in this country in a normal year is 100-200. Heat deaths are mostly certified as being due to cardiovascular or respiratory conditions. Exposure to cold air causes a rise in blood pressure and haemoconcentration which lead to increased tendency to vascular thromboses. In hot weather, haemoconcentration due to sweating and perspiration increases blood viscosity and the risk of thrombosis. Both cold and heat are significant public health hazards which should be taken into account in health care and education of health professionals.
PubMed ID
16440607 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factor patterns and their association with diet in Saami and Finnish reindeer herders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102174
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
play a role, since they reduce atherogeneity and thrombogeneity of the diet. References 1. Nayha S. Geographical variations in cardiovascular mortality in Finland, 1%1-1985. Scand J Soc Med 1989; (Suppl) 40. Pp.48. Chapter 4: Nutrition and health of indigenous poplllatioo 2. Nayha S, Hassi
  1 document  
Author
Näyhä, S
Sikkilä, K
Hassi, J
Nayha, S
Sikkila, K
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu Finland
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antioxidants
Cardiovascular disease
Diet
Finland
Health
Reindeer herders
Reindeer meat
Risk factors
Saami
Serum cholesterol
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors and their association with diet were examined in Saami (Lapp) and Finnish reindeer herders (total sample size 2705). The Saami men showed lower systolic blood pressure (130 mmHg) than the Finns (137 mmHg), higher serum total cholesterol (6.92 vs. 6.51 mmol/l) and triglycerides (1.32 vs. 1.11 mmol/l), and more Saami than Finnish men were smokers (34% vs. 27%). Subjects eating reindeer meat daily showed serum cholesterol 0.6 mmol/l higher than those who did so once a month or more rarely, the association being independent of age, season, body mass index, or consumption of coffee, milk, bread, fish, or alcohol. The high content of antioxidants of the Saami diet might explain why cardiovascular diseases are relatively uncommon in the Saami area despite the adverse risk factor pattern.
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17 records – page 1 of 2.