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The American Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Applicability of PEDI in Sweden for children aged 2.0-6.9 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33296
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1999 Jun;31(2):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
E. Nordmark
K. Orban
G. Hägglund
G B Jarnlo
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1999 Jun;31(2):95-100
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Child
Child, Preschool
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The American Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) is a new instrument for evaluating functional performance in disabled children aged 6 months to 7.5 years. It was developed to determine a child's functional capacity and performance in three domains, self-care, mobility and social function, as reflected in scores on three scales: (i) functional skills (current capability in specific tasks), (ii) caregiver assistance (i.e. provided to facilitate the child's performance), and (iii) modifications (i.e. environmental or technical modifications needed to facilitate the child's function). The present study was designed to compare results obtained using the PEDI in a Swedish sample with the American normative data, and to analyse the content and relevance of PEDI items for use in Sweden. The PEDI was administered as a questionnaire in structured interview form to the parents of 52 non-disabled Swedish children aged 2.0-6.9 years, divided into ten age groups. Correlation analysis (Pearson's r) showed scores for the Swedish sample to manifest strong correlation with the respective American normative data, both for the functional skills (r = 0.90-0.98) and caregiver assistance (r = 0.93-0.99) scales, respectively. Scores for the modification scale were not compared. Thus, the results suggest the American normative data to be appropriate for reference purposes in Sweden.
PubMed ID
10380725 View in PubMed
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