Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Ideal cardiovascular health in childhood and cardiometabolic outcomes in adulthood: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125798
Source
Circulation. 2012 Apr 24;125(16):1971-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2012
Author
Tomi T Laitinen
Katja Pahkala
Costan G Magnussen
Jorma S A Viikari
Mervi Oikonen
Leena Taittonen
Vera Mikkilä
Eero Jokinen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Mika Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Author Affiliation
BM, Research Centre of Applied & Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, Turku, Finland. tomi.laitinen@utu.fi
Source
Circulation. 2012 Apr 24;125(16):1971-8
Date
Apr-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - metabolism - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - metabolism - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness - statistics & numerical data
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - metabolism
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - blood - epidemiology - metabolism - ultrasonography
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology - metabolism - ultrasonography
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The American Heart Association (AHA) defined a new concept, cardiovascular health, and determined metrics needed to monitor it over time as part of its 2020 Impact Goal definition. Ideal cardiovascular health is defined by the presence of both ideal health behaviors and ideal health factors. The applicability of this concept to a cohort of children and its relationship with cardiometabolic outcomes in adulthood has not been reported.
The sample comprised 856 participants aged 12 to 18 years (mean age 15.0 years) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study cohort. Participants were followed up for 21 years since baseline (1986) and had data available concerning health factors and behaviors in childhood and cardiometabolic outcomes in adulthood (2007). The number of ideal cardiovascular health metrics present in childhood was associated with reduced risk of hypertension (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.66 [0.52-0.85], P
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2013 Jan;16(1):24-522945031
Comment In: Circulation. 2012 Apr 24;125(16):1955-722452833
PubMed ID
22452832 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ideal cardiovascular health in childhood-Longitudinal associations with cardiac structure and function: The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) and the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287024
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 01;230:304-309
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-01-2017
Author
Tomi T Laitinen
Saku Ruohonen
Markus Juonala
Costan G Magnussen
Vera Mikkilä
Hanna Mikola
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Päivi Tossavainen
Eero Jokinen
Harri Niinikoski
Antti Jula
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli T Raitakari
Katja Pahkala
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 01;230:304-309
Date
Mar-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Echocardiography - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Heart Ventricles - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Ideal cardiovascular health (CVH), defined by the American Heart Association, is associated with incident cardiovascular disease in adults. However, association of the ideal CVH in childhood with current and future cardiac structure and function has not been studied.
The sample comprised 827 children participating in the longitudinal Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) and The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS). In STRIP, complete data on the seven ideal CVH metrics and left ventricular (LV) mass measured with echocardiography were available at the age of 15 (n=321), 17 (n=309) and 19 (n=283) years. In YFS, the cohort comprised children aged 12-18years (n=506) with complete ideal CVH metrics data from childhood and 25years later in adulthood, and echocardiography performed in adulthood. In STRIP, ideal CVH score was inversely associated with LV mass during childhood (P=0.036). In YFS, childhood ideal CVH score was inversely associated with LV mass, LV end-diastolic volume, E/e' ratio, and left atrium end-systolic volume in adulthood (all P
PubMed ID
28040279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is dispositional optimism or dispositional pessimism predictive of ideal cardiovascular health? The Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267194
Source
Psychol Health. 2015;30(10):1221-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Serlachius
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Marko Elovainio
Mirka Hintsanen
Vera Mikkilä
Tomi T Laitinen
Markus Jokela
Tom Rosenström
Kim Josefsson
Markus Juonala
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Source
Psychol Health. 2015;30(10):1221-39
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Diet - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Personality
Prospective Studies
Smoking - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the independent association between dispositional optimism compared to dispositional pessimism and ideal cardiovascular health (defined by the American Heart Association).
A prospective design with a study sample of 1113 participants aged 24-39 years from the longitudinal Young Finns Study.
Ideal cardiovascular health (comprised of seven ideal cardiovascular health metrics) was measured in 2001. The ideal cardiovascular health metrics were reassessed in 2007.
Low pessimism rather than high optimism was a better predictor of ideal cardiovascular health in 2007. When examining the association between optimism and pessimism and the seven ideal cardiovascular health metrics in 2007 (BMI, diet, physical activity, smoking status, blood pressure, total cholesterol and plasma glucose), low pessimism predicted non-smoking status, ideal physical activity and eating a healthy diet, while high optimism was associated with eating a healthy diet.
Our findings suggest that low pessimism rather than high optimism is associated with ideal cardiovascular health, especially with health behaviours such as not smoking, being physically active and eating a healthy diet. Socio-economic status was the potential mediating or confounding factor. Future studies should examine the differential meaning of the optimism/pessimism concepts to further clarify their relation to health outcomes.
PubMed ID
25985260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lifetime measures of ideal cardiovascular health and their association with subclinical atherosclerosis: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269418
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 15;185:186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2015
Author
Tomi T Laitinen
Katja Pahkala
Costan G Magnussen
Mervi Oikonen
Jorma S A Viikari
Matthew A Sabin
Stephen R Daniels
Olli J Heinonen
Leena Taittonen
Olli Hartiala
Vera Mikkilä
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Mika Kähönen
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 15;185:186-91
Date
Apr-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
The American Heart Association recently defined 7 ideal health behaviors and factors that can be used to monitor ideal cardiovascular health (ICH) over time. These relate to smoking, physical activity, diet, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood glucose and total cholesterol. Associations between repeated measures of ICH across the life-course with outcomes of subclinical atherosclerosis in adult life have not been reported.
The sample comprised 1465 children and young adults aged 12 to 24 years (mean age 17.5 years) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study cohort. Participants were followed-up for 21 years since baseline (1986) and had complete ICH data available at baseline and follow-up. Average lifetime ICH index was associated with reduced risk of coronary artery calcification (CAC) (P=0.0004), high-risk carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (P=0.0005) and high-risk carotid distensibility (
PubMed ID
25797675 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prospective relationship of change in ideal cardiovascular health status and arterial stiffness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258298
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000532
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Heikki Aatola
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Markus Juonala
Tomi T Laitinen
Katja Pahkala
Vera Mikkilä
Risto Telama
Teemu Koivistoinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e000532
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010, the American Heart Association defined ideal cardiovascular health as the simultaneous presence of 4 favorable health behaviors (nonsmoking, ideal body mass index, physical activity at goal, and dietary pattern that promotes cardiovascular health) and 3 favorable health factors (ideal levels of total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting glucose). The association between a change in ideal cardiovascular health status and pulse wave velocity, a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease, has not been reported.
The study cohort consisted of 1143 white adults from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who were followed for 21 years since baseline (1986). This cohort was divided in 2 subgroups: 803 participants (aged 9 to 18 years at baseline) to study the health status change from childhood to adulthood and 340 participants (aged 21 to 24 years at baseline) to study health status change from young adulthood to middle age. The change in the ideal cardiovascular health index was inversely associated with pulse wave velocity (adjusted for age, sex, and heart rate), every 1-point increase corresponded to a 0.09-m/s (P
Notes
Cites: J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-6815049880
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Mar;43(3):541-614744922
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jun 4;338(23):1650-69614255
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Apr;28(3):267-7315766614
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2005 May;25(5):932-4315731494
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Jun;93(6):923-3116022763
Cites: J Pathol. 2007 Jan;211(2):157-7217200940
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(1):128-3718850486
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jun 24;117(25):3171-8018559702
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 May;27(3):191-617445071
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Dec;54(6):1328-3619884567
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Feb 2;121(4):586-61320089546
Cites: Hypertension. 2010 Mar;55(3):806-1120083727
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Mar 30;55(13):1318-2720338492
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2010 Jul;31(14):1745-5120501481
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Dec 14;122(24):2521-821126970
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Mar 1;123(8):850-721321154
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Apr 19;57(16):1690-621492767
Cites: J Pediatr. 2011 Oct;159(4):584-9021514597
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Jan 3;125(1):45-5622095826
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Feb 28;125(8):987-9522291126
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Feb 28;125(8):996-100422291127
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Apr 24;125(16):1971-822452832
Cites: Circulation. 2012 May 29;125(21):2595-60222547667
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Jun 19;125(24):2975-8422619283
Cites: Circulation. 2013 Apr 2;127(13):1369-7623547177
Cites: Circulation. 2013 May 28;127(21):2088-9623613255
Cites: Circulation. 2001 Dec 4;104(23):2815-911733400
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2003 Jan;23(1):31-612558611
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 5;290(17):2271-614600185
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Nov 5;290(17):2277-8314600186
Cites: Addict Behav. 2004 Feb;29(2):405-1114732430
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:49-633879091
PubMed ID
24614756 View in PubMed
Less detail