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Estimating the public health impact of disbanding a government alcohol monopoly: application of new methods to the case of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298003
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 Dec 22; 18(1):1400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-22-2018
Author
Tim Stockwell
Adam Sherk
Thor Norström
Colin Angus
Mats Ramstedt
Sven Andréasson
Tanya Chikritzhs
Johanna Gripenberg
Harold Holder
John Holmes
Pia Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research (CISUR), Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 2Y2, Canada. timstock@uvic.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 Dec 22; 18(1):1400
Date
Dec-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Female
Government Regulation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Privatization
Public Policy
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Government alcohol monopolies were created in North America and Scandinavia to limit health and social problems. The Swedish monopoly, Systembolaget, reports to a health ministry and controls the sale of all alcoholic beverages with >?3.5% alcohol/volume for off-premise consumption, within a public health mandate. Elsewhere, alcohol monopolies are being dismantled with evidence of increased consumption and harms. We describe innovative modelling techniques to estimate health outcomes in scenarios involving Systembolaget being replaced by 1) privately owned liquor stores, or 2) alcohol sales in grocery stores. The methods employed can be applied in other jurisdictions and for other policy changes.
Impacts of the privatisation scenarios on pricing, outlet density, trading hours, advertising and marketing were estimated based on Swedish expert opinion and published evidence. Systematic reviews were conducted to estimate impacts on alcohol consumption in each scenario. Two methods were applied to estimate harm impacts: (i) alcohol attributable morbidity and mortality were estimated utilising the International Model of Alcohol Harms and Policies (InterMAHP); (ii) ARIMA methods to estimate the relationship between per capita alcohol consumption and specific types of alcohol-related mortality and crime.
Replacing government stores with private liquor stores (Scenario 1) led to a 20.0% (95% CI, 15.3-24.7) increase in per capita consumption. Replacement with grocery stores (Scenario 2) led to a 31.2% (25.1-37.3%) increase. With InterMAHP there were 763 or?+?47% (35-59%) and 1234 or?+?76% (60-92%) more deaths per year, for Scenarios 1 and 2 respectively. With ARIMA, there were 850 (334-1444) more deaths per year in Scenario 1 and 1418 more in Scenario 2 (543-2505). InterMAHP also estimated 10,859 or?+?29% (22-34%) and 16,118 or?+?42% (35-49%) additional hospital stays per year respectively.
There would be substantial adverse consequences for public health and safety were Systembolaget to be privatised. We demonstrate a new combined approach for estimating the impact of alcohol policies on consumption and, using two alternative methods, alcohol-attributable harm. This approach could be readily adapted to other policies and settings. We note the limitation that some significant sources of uncertainty in the estimates of harm impacts were not modelled.
PubMed ID
30577827 View in PubMed
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Long-term effects of a community-based intervention: 5-year follow-up of 'Clubs against Drugs'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133023
Source
Addiction. 2011 Nov;106(11):1997-2004
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Johanna Gripenberg Abdon
Eva Wallin
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. johanna.abdon@sll.se
Source
Addiction. 2011 Nov;106(11):1997-2004
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Drug Users - education
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Law Enforcement - methods
Licensure
Logistic Models
Male
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation - methods
Public Policy
Restaurants
Role Playing
Social Control, Informal - methods
Social Environment
Street Drugs - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate long-term effects of a multi-component community-based club drug prevention programme.
A pre- (2003) and post-intervention study (2004 and 2008) design.
High-risk licensed premises in central Stockholm, Sweden.
The intervention programme, 'Clubs against Drugs', included community mobilization, drug-training for doormen and other staff, policy work, increased enforcement, environmental changes and media advocacy and public relations work.
The indicator chosen for this study was the frequency of doormen intervention towards obviously drug-intoxicated guests at licensed premises. Professional male actors (i.e. pseudopatrons) were trained to act impaired by cocaine/amphetamines while trying to enter licensed premises with doormen. An expert panel standardized the scene of drug intoxication. Each attempt was monitored by two male observers.
At the follow-up study in 2008 the doormen intervened in 65.5% of the attempts (n=55), a significant improvement compared to 27.0% (n=48) at the first follow-up in 2004 and to 7.5% (n=40) at baseline in 2003.
The 'Clubs against Drugs' community-based intervention programme, a systems approach to prevention, appears to increase the frequency and effectiveness of club doormen's interventions regarding obviously drug-intoxicated guests.
PubMed ID
21749523 View in PubMed
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Too drunk for a beer? A study of overserving in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9930
Source
Addiction. 2002 Jul;97(7):901-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Eva Wallin
Johanna Gripenberg
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karoliniska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
Addiction. 2002 Jul;97(7):901-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control
Commerce - education - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Public Policy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Role Playing
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the effects of a community alcohol prevention programme on the frequency of alcohol service to intoxicated patrons at licensed premises. DESIGN: Pretest (1996)-post-test (1999) design. SETTING: Licensed premises in Stockholm, Sweden. INTERVENTION: The community alcohol prevention programme, including server training in responsible beverage service (RBS) and policy initiatives in the community, has been conducted since 1996. PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Actors were hired to enter licensed premises, enact a scene of severe intoxication and attempt to order a beer. At the baseline in 1996, actors visited 92 licensed premises, 47 from the central part of Stockholm and 45 from the southern part of Stockholm. At the follow-up in 1999, 103 licensed premises were visited, 61 from the central part of Stockholm and 42 from the southern part of Stockholm. Observers monitored each visit. FINDINGS: At follow-up the actors were denied service of alcohol at 47% of the licensed premises, a statistically significant improvement compared to 5% in the baseline study. CONCLUSIONS: Licensed premises refused service of alcohol to intoxicated patrons to a much greater extent than in the baseline study. The improved results can probably be explained by a combination of policy initiatives in the community, changes in the overall enforcement environment and RBS training.
PubMed ID
12133129 View in PubMed
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