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Heredity of food allergies in an unselected child population: An epidemiological survey from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100240
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010 Oct 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2010
Author
Kaisa Pyrhönen
Liisa Hiltunen
Minna Kaila
Simo Näyhä
Esa Läärä
Author Affiliation
South Karelia District of Social and Health Services, Lappeenranta, Finland Unit of General Practice, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Health Centre of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Paediatric Research Centre, Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010 Oct 20;
Date
Oct-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Pyrhönen K, Hiltunen L, Kaila M, Näyhä S, Läärä E. Heredity of food allergies in an unselected child population: An epidemiological survey from Finland.?Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010.?© 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S The heredity of food allergies (FA) has not previously been addressed in a large unselected child population. Our target population comprised all children born from April 2001 to March 2006 resident in one province of South-East Finland (n c. 6000), as identified from the national population register. In a questionnaire survey conducted in 2005-2006, data were obtained on allergic manifestations (FA symptoms, atopic rash, allergic asthma, hay fever/pollen allergy, or animal allergy) in the biologic parents of 3800 children (64% of the total). Concurrently with the survey but independently of it, results of specific immunoglobulin E antibodies (sIgE), skin prick tests (SPT), and open food challenges (OFC) in the offspring were collected from patient records throughout the province. Up to the age of 4 yr, the incidences of any positive FA test, a positive SPT or sIgE for food items, and a positive OFC in these children were threefold higher if both parents reported having an allergic manifestation and twofold higher if either mother or father had such a manifestation when compared with children whose parents did not report any of these conditions. The estimated risk of any positive FA test increased by a factor of 1.3 (95% CI 1.2-1.4) for each additional allergic manifestation in the parents. Positive FA tests in the offspring were relatively strongly associated with the reports of allergic phenotypes and the number of these phenotypes in their biologic parents.
PubMed ID
20961338 View in PubMed
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Real-life epidemiology of food allergy testing in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137415
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Jun;22(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Kaisa Pyrhönen
Liisa Hiltunen
Simo Näyhä
Esa Läärä
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kaisa.pyrhonen@oulu.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Jun;22(4):361-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Finland
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Molecular Diagnostic Techniques - economics - trends
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
The cumulative incidence of parental-reported symptoms of food allergy (FA) during the first years of life is estimated to exceed 30%. However, the occurrence and determinants of FA testing in a general child population have remained unknown.
The study population comprised all 5920 children aged 0-4 yr in the province of South Karelia, Finland, identified from the nationwide population register. The study included a questionnaire survey and a retrospective collection of FA test results (skin prick tests, IgE antibodies, or open food challenges) from the patient records of the entire study population. The questionnaire and patient record data were linked together on an individual basis with the parents' permission.
A total of 5849 FA tests had been performed on 961 children. By the age of 4 yr, the cumulative incidence of FA testing was 18% for any food item; 17% for essential items (milk, egg, cereals) and 9% for other food items. Essential food items had been tested in 90% of children who reportedly had a physician-diagnosed FA for these. The incidence of testing was 30% higher in boys than in girls and twofold higher among the offspring whose either or both parents reportedly had some allergic manifestation.
A large proportion of children are subjected to FA testing in their early years. This result shows the need to evaluate the financial burden of FA testing and to improve current testing practices.
PubMed ID
21284748 View in PubMed
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Season of the first trimester of pregnancy predicts sensitisation to food allergens in childhood: a population-based cohort study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139978
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jan;66(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Kaisa Pyrhönen
Esa Läärä
Liisa Hiltunen
Minna Kaila
Timo Hugg
Simo Näyhä
Author Affiliation
South Karelian Institute, Lappeenranta University of Technology, PO Box 20, FIN-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland. kaisa.pyrhonen@oulu.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jan;66(1):49-56
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Incidence
Infant
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Nutritional Status
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
To examine whether the season of birth or season of the early phase of gestation is associated with sensitisation to food allergens in children, with special reference to mothers' pollen exposure in spring.
A population-based cohort study linking information from a questionnaire survey to allergy tests performed on the target population and regional pollen counts.
Children born in 2001-6 who were resident in the province of South Karelia, Finland, at the time of the survey (N=5920).
A positive result in any food allergy test or food-specific immunoglobulin E test (sIgE).
The cumulative incidence of a positive food allergy test up to the age of 4 years was highest among children born in October-November (10%) and lowest among those born in June-July (5%), and correspondingly highest among children who were in their 11th gestational week in April-May (11%), the season of high concentrations of birch and alder pollen, and lowest among those reaching that stage in December-January (6%). The amplitude of seasonal variation in any test, estimated as the relative ratio between the peak and trough of the smoothed incidence curve over the year, was 2.03 (95% CI 1.52 to 2.76). The amplitudes of positive sIgE were especially pronounced for milk (3.07; 95% CI 1.81 to 5.50) and egg (3.03; 95% CI 1.86 to 5.18).
Children having their early gestational period in the pollen season for broad-leafed trees are more prone to sensitisation to food allergens than other children.
PubMed ID
20959386 View in PubMed
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SKARP--A population-based cohort study of childhood food-associated symptoms perceived by parents and food allergies diagnosed by physicians: design, methods and participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137690
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Kaisa Pyrhönen
Esa Läärä
Minna Kaila
Liisa Hiltunen
Simo Näyhä
Author Affiliation
South Karelia District of Social and Health Services, Lappeenranta, Finland. kaisa.pyrhonen@oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):194-202
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - diagnostic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Infant
Male
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Abstract
Few epidemiological studies exist on food-associated symptoms and allergies in large unselected child populations.
To describe the design, methods and participation rate of the South Karelian Allergy Research Project (SKARP), a population-based epidemiological study on food-associated symptoms and physician-diagnosed food allergies.
The study population of 5,973 children born between 2001 and 2006 and resident in the province of South Karelia, Finland, was identified from the nationwide population register. The parents received a questionnaire to be returned at their child's annual visit to the child health clinic, where supplementary interviews were performed. Results of allergy tests (skin prick tests, immunoglobulin E antibodies and open food challenges) performed on participants and non-participants were collected from the relevant health care units in the area.
Participation rates in the questionnaire study were 54% (644/1,194) among the parents of neonates and 69% (3308/4,779) among those of the children aged 1 to 4 years. Cooperation with the child health clinics and mailing of a reminder questionnaire improved participation by 8 and 10 percentage points, respectively. The final participation rate seemed to be unaffected by whether the child had or had not been tested for suspected allergy.
A reasonably good participation rate and almost complete coverage of allergy tests were achieved thanks to successful cooperation with the child health clinics and test laboratories. This baseline study forms a representative database to estimate the occurrence of food-associated symptoms, physician-diagnosed food allergies and allergy testing in the general population.
PubMed ID
21257644 View in PubMed
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