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Are changes in objective working hour characteristics associated with changes in work-life conflict among hospital employees working shifts? A 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302200
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 06; 75(6):407-411
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Kati Karhula
Aki Koskinen
Anneli Ojajärvi
Annina Ropponen
Sampsa Puttonen
Mika Kivimäki
Mikko Härmä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 06; 75(6):407-411
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Conflict (Psychology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress - epidemiology - psychology
Personnel, Hospital
Public Sector
Shift Work Schedule - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Work-Life Balance
Workforce
Workload - psychology
Abstract
To investigate whether changes in objective working hour characteristics are associated with parallel changes in work-life conflict (WLC) among hospital employees.
Survey responses from three waves of the Finnish Public Sector study (2008, 2012 and 2015) were combined with payroll data from 91 days preceding the surveys (n=2 482, 93% women). Time-dependent fixed effects regression models adjusted for marital status, number of children and stressfulness of the life situation were used to investigate whether changes in working hour characteristics were associated with parallel change in WLC. The working hour characteristics were dichotomised with cut-points in less than or greater than 10%?or less than or greater than25%?occurrence) and WLC to frequent versus seldom/none.
Change in proportion of evening and night shifts and weekend work was significantly associated with parallel change in WLC (adjusted OR 2.19, 95%?CI 1.62 to 2.96; OR 1.71, 95%?CI 1.21 to 2.44; OR 1.63, 95%?CI 1.194 to 2.22, respectively). Similarly, increase or decrease in proportion of quick returns (adjusted OR 1.45, 95%?CI 1.10 to 1.89) and long work weeks (adjusted OR 1.26, 95%?CI 1.04 to 1.52) was associated with parallel increase or decrease in WLC. Single days off and very long work weeks showed no association with WLC.
Changes in unsocial working hour characteristics, especially in connection with evening shifts, are consistently associated with parallel changes in WLC.
PubMed ID
29367350 View in PubMed
Less detail

Objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292257
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(7):876-885
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Kati Karhula
Sampsa Puttonen
Annina Ropponen
Aki Koskinen
Anneli Ojajärvi
Mika Kivimäki
Mikko Härmä
Author Affiliation
a Work Ability and Work Careers, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(7):876-885
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
After-Hours Care
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Public - manpower
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Personnel, Hospital
Public Sector - manpower
Risk factors
Shift Work Schedule - psychology
Time Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Work-Life Balance
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This epidemiological cohort study, based on Finnish public sector data, investigated the associations between objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict in day and shift work. The comprehensive data of hospital workers (n = 8 931, 92% women, average age 45 years), consisted of survey responses from 2012, linked with the payroll data of working hour characteristics from 91 days preceding the survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between working hour characteristics and experiencing work-life conflict often/very often. The analyses were adjusted for age (50 years), sex, level of education, marital status, number of small (0-6 years) and school-aged (7-18 years) children, and the overall stressfulness of the life situation. We also conducted stratified analyses of age and sex on the basis of significant interactions. Difficulties in combining work and life were more often associated with shift work without night shifts and shift work with night shifts than with day work (41% and 34 versus 27%; OR for shift work with night shifts 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-2.00, OR for shift work without night shifts 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). A high proportion (> 25%) of long (> 40h, (OR 1.26, 95% 1.14-1.39) and very long (> 48h, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.49) weekly working hours were associated with work-life conflict, and in the stratified analysis, the latter was also true among women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25-1.89). Of the unsocial working hour characteristics, a relatively large amount (> 10% of all shifts) of evening (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72) and night shifts (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.32-1.61), a high proportion (> 25% of all shifts) of quick returns ( 25% of all days off) was associated with work-life conflict among men (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.25), but not in the whole sample. When the two types of shift work were analyzed separately, shift work without night shifts and very long work weeks had higher odds (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.20-1.80) of work-life conflict than shift work with night shifts. Conversely, weekend work and evening shifts had higher odds of work-life conflict among shift workers with night shifts (OR 1.74, 95% 1.55-1.96; (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.40-1.77) than among those without night shifts. To conclude, this study shows that shift workers with and without night shifts more often have difficulties combining work and life than day workers. Several unsocial working hour characteristics, including long work weeks, evening and night shifts, weekend work, and quick returns, are associated with work-life conflict.
PubMed ID
28590149 View in PubMed
Less detail