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Are changes in objective working hour characteristics associated with changes in work-life conflict among hospital employees working shifts? A 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302200
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 06; 75(6):407-411
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Kati Karhula
Aki Koskinen
Anneli Ojajärvi
Annina Ropponen
Sampsa Puttonen
Mika Kivimäki
Mikko Härmä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2018 06; 75(6):407-411
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Conflict (Psychology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress - epidemiology - psychology
Personnel, Hospital
Public Sector
Shift Work Schedule - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Work-Life Balance
Workforce
Workload - psychology
Abstract
To investigate whether changes in objective working hour characteristics are associated with parallel changes in work-life conflict (WLC) among hospital employees.
Survey responses from three waves of the Finnish Public Sector study (2008, 2012 and 2015) were combined with payroll data from 91 days preceding the surveys (n=2 482, 93% women). Time-dependent fixed effects regression models adjusted for marital status, number of children and stressfulness of the life situation were used to investigate whether changes in working hour characteristics were associated with parallel change in WLC. The working hour characteristics were dichotomised with cut-points in less than or greater than 10%?or less than or greater than25%?occurrence) and WLC to frequent versus seldom/none.
Change in proportion of evening and night shifts and weekend work was significantly associated with parallel change in WLC (adjusted OR 2.19, 95%?CI 1.62 to 2.96; OR 1.71, 95%?CI 1.21 to 2.44; OR 1.63, 95%?CI 1.194 to 2.22, respectively). Similarly, increase or decrease in proportion of quick returns (adjusted OR 1.45, 95%?CI 1.10 to 1.89) and long work weeks (adjusted OR 1.26, 95%?CI 1.04 to 1.52) was associated with parallel increase or decrease in WLC. Single days off and very long work weeks showed no association with WLC.
Changes in unsocial working hour characteristics, especially in connection with evening shifts, are consistently associated with parallel changes in WLC.
PubMed ID
29367350 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of modifications to the health and social sector's collective agreement on the objective characteristics of working hours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291007
Source
Ind Health. 2017 Aug 08; 55(4):354-361
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-08-2017
Author
Annina Ropponen
Päivi Vanttola
Aki Koskinen
Tarja Hakola
Sampsa Puttonen
Mikko Härmä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
Source
Ind Health. 2017 Aug 08; 55(4):354-361
Date
Aug-08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Collective Bargaining
Female
Finland
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Shift Work Schedule
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Workers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an intervention on objective working-hour characteristics. The intervention involved making modifications to the collective agreement that would limit employees' entitlement to time off as compensation. The intervention group consisted of 493 and the control group of 2,303 health and social care shift workers, respectively. We analysed the objective pay roll-based working-hour data for 2012-2013, which we obtained from employers' records, using the repeated measures mixed model. The changes in objective working-hour characteristics were small, but systematic. The intervention had some positive effects: the amount of short recovery periods (
Notes
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PubMed ID
28420807 View in PubMed
Less detail

Objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292257
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(7):876-885
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Kati Karhula
Sampsa Puttonen
Annina Ropponen
Aki Koskinen
Anneli Ojajärvi
Mika Kivimäki
Mikko Härmä
Author Affiliation
a Work Ability and Work Careers, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(7):876-885
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
After-Hours Care
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Public - manpower
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Stress - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Personnel, Hospital
Public Sector - manpower
Risk factors
Shift Work Schedule - psychology
Time Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Work-Life Balance
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This epidemiological cohort study, based on Finnish public sector data, investigated the associations between objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict in day and shift work. The comprehensive data of hospital workers (n = 8 931, 92% women, average age 45 years), consisted of survey responses from 2012, linked with the payroll data of working hour characteristics from 91 days preceding the survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between working hour characteristics and experiencing work-life conflict often/very often. The analyses were adjusted for age (50 years), sex, level of education, marital status, number of small (0-6 years) and school-aged (7-18 years) children, and the overall stressfulness of the life situation. We also conducted stratified analyses of age and sex on the basis of significant interactions. Difficulties in combining work and life were more often associated with shift work without night shifts and shift work with night shifts than with day work (41% and 34 versus 27%; OR for shift work with night shifts 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-2.00, OR for shift work without night shifts 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). A high proportion (> 25%) of long (> 40h, (OR 1.26, 95% 1.14-1.39) and very long (> 48h, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.49) weekly working hours were associated with work-life conflict, and in the stratified analysis, the latter was also true among women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25-1.89). Of the unsocial working hour characteristics, a relatively large amount (> 10% of all shifts) of evening (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72) and night shifts (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.32-1.61), a high proportion (> 25% of all shifts) of quick returns ( 25% of all days off) was associated with work-life conflict among men (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.25), but not in the whole sample. When the two types of shift work were analyzed separately, shift work without night shifts and very long work weeks had higher odds (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.20-1.80) of work-life conflict than shift work with night shifts. Conversely, weekend work and evening shifts had higher odds of work-life conflict among shift workers with night shifts (OR 1.74, 95% 1.55-1.96; (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.40-1.77) than among those without night shifts. To conclude, this study shows that shift workers with and without night shifts more often have difficulties combining work and life than day workers. Several unsocial working hour characteristics, including long work weeks, evening and night shifts, weekend work, and quick returns, are associated with work-life conflict.
PubMed ID
28590149 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prolonged sleep restriction induces changes in pathways involved in cholesterol metabolism and inflammatory responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289338
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 04 22; 6:24828
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-22-2016
Author
Vilma Aho
Hanna M Ollila
Erkki Kronholm
Isabel Bondia-Pons
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Mika Hilvo
Ilkka Seppälä
Johannes Kettunen
Mervi Oikonen
Emma Raitoharju
Tuulia Hyötyläinen
Mika Kähönen
Jorma S A Viikari
Mikko Härmä
Mikael Sallinen
Vesa M Olkkonen
Harri Alenius
Matti Jauhiainen
Tiina Paunio
Terho Lehtimäki
Veikko Salomaa
Matej Orešic
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Ala-Korpela
Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 04 22; 6:24828
Date
04-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Chemical Analysis
Cholesterol - metabolism
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Profiling
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Metabolome
Middle Aged
Sleep Deprivation - complications
Abstract
Sleep loss and insufficient sleep are risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, but data on how insufficient sleep contributes to these diseases are scarce. These questions were addressed using two approaches: an experimental, partial sleep restriction study (14 cases and 7 control subjects) with objective verification of sleep amount, and two independent epidemiological cohorts (altogether 2739 individuals) with questions of sleep insufficiency. In both approaches, blood transcriptome and serum metabolome were analysed. Sleep loss decreased the expression of genes encoding cholesterol transporters and increased expression in pathways involved in inflammatory responses in both paradigms. Metabolomic analyses revealed lower circulating large HDL in the population cohorts among subjects reporting insufficient sleep, while circulating LDL decreased in the experimental sleep restriction study. These findings suggest that prolonged sleep deprivation modifies inflammatory and cholesterol pathways at the level of gene expression and serum lipoproteins, inducing changes toward potentially higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27102866 View in PubMed
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The Vicious Circle of Working Hours, Sleep, and Recovery in Expert Work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297900
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 06 28; 15(7):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-28-2018
Author
Annina Ropponen
Mikko Härmä
Barbara Bergbom
Jouko Nätti
Mikael Sallinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 18, 00032 Helsinki, Finland. annina.ropponen@ttl.fi.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 06 28; 15(7):
Date
06-28-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Attention - physiology
Commerce
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Information Technology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sleep - physiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology - psychology
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate working hours, sleep quality and alertness, and recovery and detachment in expert work using a mobile app. The study sample comprised members of The Finnish Business School Graduates and employees of an information technology (IT) company. The final study sample included 154 employees with at least four days of mobile app data. For statistical analyses of the survey and mobile app data (cross-sectional setting), we used logistic regression, and for the day-to-day data, we used multi-level logistic regression to calculate the odds ratios (OR), and a general equation estimates model for regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The results showed that moderate to fair sleep quality or alertness at awakening were associated with longer working hours the following day (OR 1.07?1.14, 95% CI 1.01?1.22). Recovery and detachment during the preceding day were associated with longer working hours. These associations were the same in the opposite direction. To conclude, the day-to-day ratings of sleep quality and alertness at awakening, and recovery and detachment from work during leisure time were associated with increased working hours the following day. In addition, longer working hours the preceding day were associated with worse ratings of sleep quality, alertness, recovery, and detachment.
PubMed ID
29958458 View in PubMed
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