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Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300924
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-22-2018
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Anders Esberg
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@umu.se.
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Date
11-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood glucose
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The association between milk and dairy intake and the incidence of cardiometabolic diseases, cancer and mortality has been evaluated in many studies, but these studies have had conflicting results with no clear conclusion on causal or confounding associations. The present study aims to further address this association by cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of the associations between exposure to various types of dairy products and metabolic risk markers among inhabitants in northern Sweden while taking other lifestyle factors into account.
Respondents in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme with complete and plausible diet data between 1991 and 2016 were included, yielding 124,934 observations from 90,512 unique subjects. For longitudinal analysis, 27,682 participants with a visit 8-12?years after the first visit were identified. All participants completed a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Metabolic risk markers, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum (S) cholesterol and triglycerides, and blood glucose, were measured. Participants were categorized into quintiles by intake of dairy products, and risk (odds ratios, OR) of undesirable levels of metabolic risk markers was assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In longitudinal analyses, intake quintiles were related to desirable levels of metabolic risk markers at both visits or deterioration at follow-up using Cox regression analyses.
The OR of being classified with an undesirable BMI decreased with increasing quintiles of total dairy, cheese and butter intake but increased with increasing non-fermented milk intake. The OR of being classified with an undesirable S-cholesterol level increased with increasing intake of total dairy, butter and high fat (3%) non-fermented milk, whereas an undesirable S-triglyceride level was inversely associated with cheese and butter intake in women. In longitudinal analyses, increasing butter intake was associated with deterioration of S-cholesterol and blood glucose levels, whereas increasing cheese intake was associated with a lower risk of deterioration of S-triglycerides.
Confounding factors likely contribute to the demonstrated association between dairy intake and mortality, and other medical conditions and analyses should be stratified by dairy type.
PubMed ID
30466440 View in PubMed
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A traditional Sami diet score as a determinant of mortality in a general northern Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124404
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Anna Winkvist
Magritt Brustad
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diet - ethnology
Diet Surveys
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life expectancy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between "traditional Sami" dietary pattern and mortality in a general northern Swedish population.
Population-based cohort study.
We examined 77,319 subjects from the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) cohort. A traditional Sami diet score was constructed by adding 1 point for intake above the median level of red meat, fatty fish, total fat, berries and boiled coffee, and 1 point for intake below the median of vegetables, bread and fibre. Hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were calculated by Cox regression.
Increasing traditional Sami diet scores were associated with slightly elevated all-cause mortality in men [Multivariate HR per 1-point increase in score 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07), p=0.018], but not for women [Multivariate HR 1.03 (95% CI 0.99-1.07), p=0.130]. This increased risk was approximately equally attributable to cardiovascular disease and cancer, though somewhat more apparent for cardiovascular disease mortality in men free from diabetes, hypertension and obesity at baseline [Multivariate HR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.20), p=0.023].
A weak increased all-cause mortality was observed in men with higher traditional Sami diet scores. However, due to the complexity in defining a "traditional Sami" diet, and the limitations of our questionnaire for this purpose, the study should be considered exploratory, a first attempt to relate a "traditional Sami" dietary pattern to health endpoints. Further investigation of cohorts with more detailed information on dietary and lifestyle items relevant for traditional Sami culture is warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22584519 View in PubMed
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