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161 records – page 1 of 17.

Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264009
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2015 May;65(5):523-531.e2
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
May-2015
Author
Helle Søholm
Christian Hassager
Freddy Lippert
Matilde Winther-Jensen
Jakob Hartvig Thomsen
Hans Friberg
John Bro-Jeppesen
Lars Køber
Jesper Kjaergaard
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2015 May;65(5):523-531.e2
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - mortality
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Patient Admission
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has an overall poor prognosis. We sought to identify what temporal trends and influencing factors existed for this condition in one region.
We studied consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients from 2007 to 2011 with attempted resuscitation in Copenhagen. From an Utstein database, we assessed survival to admission and comorbidity with the Charlson comorbidity index from the National Patient Registry and employment status from the Danish Rational Economic Agents Model database. We used logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with outcome.
Of a total of 2,527 attempted resuscitations in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, 40% (n=1,015) were successfully resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. The strongest independent factors associated with successful resuscitation were shockable primary rhythm (multivariate odds ratio [OR]=3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1 to 5.0), witnessed arrest (multivariate OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.7 to 4.6), and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a public area (multivariate OR=2.1; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.8), whereas no comorbidity (multivariate OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.45), sex (multivariate OR=1.14; 95% CI 0.91 to 1.44), and employment status (multivariate OR=1.17; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.56) were not independently associated with outcome. The number of patients with a high comorbidity burden (Charlson comorbidity index =3) increased during the study period (P trend
PubMed ID
25544733 View in PubMed
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Effect of extended follow-up in a specialized heart failure clinic on adherence to guideline recommended therapy: NorthStar Adherence Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264259
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Nov;16(11):1249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Morten Schou
Gunnar Gislason
Lars Videbaek
Lars Kober
Christian Tuxen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Per R Hildebrandt
Finn Gustafsson
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2014 Nov;16(11):1249-55
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence
Heart Failure - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The optimal duration of a public heart failure (HF) clinic programme is unknown. This substudy of the NT-proBNP stratified follow-up in outpatient heart failure clinics (NorthStar) trial was designed to evaluate the effect of extended follow-up in an outpatient HF clinic on long-term adherence to guideline-based therapy.
Patients with HF with reduced EF on optimal medical therapy (n = 921) were randomized to either extended follow-up in the HF clinic (n = 461) or discharge to primary care (n = 460) and followed for a median of 4.1 years (range: 13 months to 6.1 years). The effect of the HF clinic intervention on treatment adherence (time to at least a 90 day break in treatment) was estimated by drug dispensing from pharmacies of an ACE inhibitor/ARB, beta-blocker (BB), or mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (MRA). Median age was 69 years, 25% were females, LVEF was 30%, and 90% were in NYHA class II-III. The HF clinic intervention did not reduce time to a 90 day break in treatment with either an ACE inhibitor/ARB [hazard ratio (HR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-1.97, P = 0.650], a BB (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.53-2.66, P = 0.820), or an MRA (HR 1.30, 95% CI 0.85-2.00, P = 0.238).
Extended follow-up in an outpatient HF clinic did not improve long-term adherence to guideline-based therapy, and adherence did not deteriorate when follow-up was shifted from the HF clinic to primary care.
PubMed ID
25311554 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and elevated N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide: a 10-year analysis from the Copenhagen Hospital Heart Failure Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127206
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 Mar;14(3):240-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Christian Malchau Carlsen
Morten Bay
Vibeke Kirk
Jens Peter Gøtze
Lars Køber
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. cmc@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 Mar;14(3):240-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality - ultrasonography
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prevalence
Prognosis
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological features and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and to compare these findings with those from patients with reduced ejection fraction. Furthermore the effects of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) requirement in the heart failure diagnosis were assessed by repeating the analyses in the subgroup of patients with elevated NT-proBNP.
In 1844 patients admitted, a clinical diagnosis of heart failure was made in 433; amongst these 61% had HFPEF. An elevated NT-proBNP applied to the heart failure diagnosis reduced the number of heart failure patients to 191, and amongst these 29% had preserved ejection fraction. Use of NT-proBNP reduced clinical differences between heart failure patients with preserved and reduced ejection fraction. When not using NT-proBNP, patients with reduced ejection fraction had higher mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.52; P = 0.04], even after adjustment for other significant predictors of mortality, except NT-proBNP (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.59; P = 0.02). However, no difference in mortality was observed when NT-proBNP was adjusted for (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.71-1.15; P = 0.4), or used for the heart failure diagnosis (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.71-1.29; P = 0.8).
Using a heart failure diagnosis requiring elevated NT-proBNP reduces the prevalence of HFPEF and results in a survival similar to that of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. In contrast, when NT-proBNP is not used for the heart failure diagnosis or adjusted for, HFPEF is associated with a lower mortality in both univariate and multivariate analysis.
PubMed ID
22315457 View in PubMed
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Prognostic importance of complete atrioventricular block complicating acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53488
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2003 Oct 1;92(7):853-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2003
Author
Mark Aplin
Thomas Engstrøm
Niels G Vejlstrup
Peter Clemmensen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Lars Køber
Author Affiliation
Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mark_alpin@mail.dk
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2003 Oct 1;92(7):853-6
Date
Oct-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arrhythmia - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Heart Block - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - epidemiology
Abstract
Third-degree atrioventricular block after acute myocardial infarction is considered to have prognostic importance. However, its importance in conjunction with thrombolytic therapy and its relation to left ventricular function remains uncertain. This report also outlines an important distinction between atrioventricular block in the setting of anterior and inferior wall acute myocardial infarction, with profound clinical and prognostic implications.
PubMed ID
14516893 View in PubMed
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Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53512
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Jun;37(3):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Michael Mundt Ottesen
Ulrik Dixen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Lars Køber
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Copenhagen County, Gentofte, Denmark. michael.8sen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Jun;37(3):141-8
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Structured interview of 250 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome and relatives of 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. The following courses of action were studied: contact the emergency medical service (centre); contact the general practitioner from the emergency service or the general practitioner during working hours; self-transportation to the emergency department; or as the first action to call the emergency medical service. RESULTS: Forty-four per cent of the patients admitted with cardiac arrest expressed no prior symptoms. Two-thirds of patients with typical symptoms interpreted it as cardiac-still only half took action within 20 min. Fifty per cent of patients who called a physician were delayed by wrong advice or misinterpretation. One hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling for medical assistance. Perceiving jeopardy had positive influence on the behaviour. Awareness of therapeutic options influences the decision-making process.
Notes
Comment In: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Sep;37(4):181-212944203
PubMed ID
12881155 View in PubMed
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The prognostic value of QTc interval and QT dispersion following myocardial infarction in patients treated with or without dofetilide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53539
Source
Clin Cardiol. 2003 May;26(5):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Bente Brendorp
Hanne Elming
Li Jun
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. bb@heart.dk
Source
Clin Cardiol. 2003 May;26(5):219-25
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - methods - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Long QT Syndrome - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Phenethylamines - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sulfonamides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Survival Analysis
Systole
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an increased risk of death, with a 1-year mortality close to 10% in patients discharged from hospital alive. During the first year following MI, close to 50% of deaths are assumed to be due to arrhythmic events. HYPOTHESIS: The study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dofetilide treatment and pretreatment QTc interval and QT dispersion regarding mortality in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a recent MI. METHODS: The study population consisted of 894 patients with a recent MI and LV systolic dysfunction, who were randomized to receive dofetilide or placebo. The study was a substudy of the Danish Investigations of Arrhythmia and Mortality on Dofetilide-MI (DIAMOND-MI). RESULTS: During a minimum of 1-year follow-up, 261 (29%) patients died. Baseline QTc interval did not hold any prognostic value on mortality for placebo-treated patients. When pretreatment QTc interval was 429 ms, dofetilide did not influence mortality significantly. This study revealed no statistically significant relation between QT dispersion, dofetilide treatment, and mortality. CONCLUSION: In patients with a recent MI, LV dysfunction, and a short baseline QTc interval, dofetilide is associated with significant survival benefit. This benefit is not seen with a longer QTc interval. QT dispersion is not a risk factor in this population.
PubMed ID
12769249 View in PubMed
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Long-term survival in patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure: relation to preserved and reduced left ventricular systolic function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53548
Source
Eur Heart J. 2003 May;24(9):863-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Finn Gustafsson
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Bente Brendorp
Marie Seibaek
Hans Burchardt
Lars Køber
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology E, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2003 May;24(9):863-70
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - mortality - therapy
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - complications - mortality
Abstract
AIMS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of left ventricular systolic function on the survival in a large consecutive cohort of patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure and to determine how left ventricular systolic function interacts with co-morbid conditions in terms of prognosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Analysis of survival data from 5491 patients admitted for new or worsening heart failure to 34 departments of cardiology or internal medicine in Denmark from 1993-1996 was carried out. A standardized echocardiogram was available for 95% of the patients, and left ventricular systolic function was estimated using wall motion index score. Follow-up time was 5-8 years. Patients with preserved systolic function were older, more frequently female, and had less evidence of ischemia than patients with systolic dysfunction. After 1 year, 24% of the patients had died. Low wall motion index was a potent independent predictor of death (risk ratio for one unit increase, 0.60 (0.56-0.64)), and was of greater prognostic significance in younger patients and patients with a history of myocardial ischemia. However, even in patients with preserved systolic function, mortality was high (1 year mortality, 19%). CONCLUSION: In hospitalized heart failure patients, particularly in younger patients with ischemic heart disease, mortality risk is inversely related to left ventricular systolic function.
PubMed ID
12727154 View in PubMed
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Fractal analysis of heart rate variability and mortality after an acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53688
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Aug 15;90(4):347-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2002
Author
Jari M Tapanainen
Poul Erik Bloch Thomsen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Timo H Mäkikallio
Aino-Maija Still
Kai S Lindgren
Heikki V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Aug 15;90(4):347-52
Date
Aug-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Female
Fractals
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - physiopathology
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The recently developed fractal analysis of heart rate (HR) variability has been suggested to provide prognostic information about patients with heart failure. This prospective multicenter study was designed to assess the prognostic significance of fractal and traditional HR variability parameters in a large, consecutive series of survivors of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A consecutive series of 697 patients were recruited to participate 2 to 7 days after an AMI in 3 Nordic university hospitals. The conventional time-domain and spectral parameters and the newer fractal scaling indexes of HR variability were analyzed from 24-hour RR interval recordings. During the mean follow-up of 18.4 +/- 6.5 months, 49 patients (7.0%) died. Of all the risk variables, a reduced short-term fractal scaling exponent (alpha(1)
PubMed ID
12161220 View in PubMed
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One-year mortality in coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99018
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(6-7):456-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rasmus V Rasmussen
Ulrika Snygg-Martin
Lars Olaison
Rune Andersson
Kristine Buchholtz
Carsten T Larsen
Thomas F Hansen
Lars Køber
Christian Hassager
Niels E Bruun
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ravera02@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(6-7):456-61
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coagulase
Denmark - epidemiology
Endocarditis, Bacterial - microbiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology - mortality
Staphylococcus - isolation & purification
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate in-hospital mortality and 12-month mortality in patients with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) compared to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infective endocarditis (IE). We used a prospective cohort study of 66 consecutive CoNS and 170 S. aureus IE patients, collected at 2 tertiary university hospitals in Copenhagen (Denmark) and at 1 tertiary university hospital in Gothenburg (Sweden). Median (range) C-reactive protein at admission was higher in patients with S. aureus IE (150 mg/l (1-521) vs 94 mg/l (6-303); p
PubMed ID
19396665 View in PubMed
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Long-term prognostic importance of resting heart rate in patients with left ventricular dysfunction in connection with either heart failure or myocardial infarction: the DIAMOND study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99077
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2010 Apr 30;140(3):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2010
Author
Emil Loldrup Fosbøl
Marie Seibaek
Bente Brendorp
Daniel Vega Moller
Jens Jakob Thune
Gunnar H Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Lars Køber
Author Affiliation
The Heart Centre, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ELF@heart.dk
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2010 Apr 30;140(3):279-86
Date
Apr-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - complications
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Survival Rate
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with increased mortality in a variety of cardiac diseases, but comparisons between different clinical settings are lacking. We investigated the long-term prognostic importance of resting heart rate in patients hospitalized with left ventricular dysfunction in connection with either heart failure (HF) or myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: In the Danish Investigations and Arrhythmia ON Dofetilide (DIAMOND) study; patients with left ventricular dysfunction were randomized to Dofetilide (class III antiarrhythmic drug) or placebo. One part of the study enrolled 1518 patients with HF and another 1510 patients with MI. Mortality analyses were performed using multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: During 10 years of follow-up, 1076 (72%) patients with MI and 1336 (89%) patients with HF died. In multivariable adjusted models, every increment in baseline heart rate of 10 bpm was associated with an increase in mortality in both MI-patients (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95%-confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.19; P
PubMed ID
19095316 View in PubMed
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161 records – page 1 of 17.