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Associations between diet and the hyperapobetalipoproteinemia phenotype expression in children and young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208599
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 May;17(5):820-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
I O Nuotio
O T Raitakari
K V Porkka
L. Räsänen
T. Moilanen
J S Viikari
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Turku, Finland. ilpo.nuotio@ktl.fi
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 May;17(5):820-5
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Child
Cholesterol Esters - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemias - blood
Male
Phenotype
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The effect of diet on blood lipids has been under intensive study during recent decades. However, diet in the context of the hyperapobetalipoproteinemia (hyperapoB) phenotype has received less attention. The hyperapoB phenotype is commonly encountered in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is defined as a combination of an increased concentration of apolipoprotein B (apo B), a normal concentration of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and as a result, a low LDL-C/apo B ratio. We studied the associations between diet and blood lipids in a cohort of 534 children and young adults 9 to 24 years old. The ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fats (P/S ratio) correlated (r=-0.19, P
PubMed ID
9157943 View in PubMed
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Associations of serum lipids with metabolic control and diet in young subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221776
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Feb;47(2):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
S M Virtanen
L. Räsänen
M. Virtanen
H. Sippola
A. Rilva
E A Kaprio
J. Mäenpää
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Aurora Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Feb;47(2):141-9
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diet therapy - metabolism
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Hospitals, Pediatric
Hospitals, University
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Association of serum lipids with metabolic control and diet were studied in 72 young subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Data on food consumption were collected by the 48-h recall method. Glycosylated haemoglobin (Hb) A1 was used as a measure of metabolic control. There were no differences between males and females in the mean values for serum total cholesterol (TC, 4.5 and 4.9 mmol/l, respectively), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, 2.7 and 3.0 mmol/l), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, 1.3 and 1.4 mmol/l), or serum triglycerides (TG, 1.1 and 1.0 mmol/l). Diabetic subjects who were in better metabolic control (HbA1 or = 10.5%) had lower TC and TG values and a higher HDL-C/TC ratio. HbA1 level and intake of saturated fatty acids were positively associated with serum TC and LDL-C values and explained 14% and 15% of the variation in TC and LDL-C, respectively. HbA1 level and insulin dose per kg of body weight were positively associated with serum TG values and explained 30% of the variation in TG. Serum TC and LDL-C levels of young subjects with IDDM could be lowered by improving their metabolic control and decreasing their saturated fatty acid intake.
PubMed ID
8436092 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and adolescents. VI. Serum apolipoproteins A-I and B.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239510
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T. Solakivi-Jaakkola
T. Nikkari
J. Viikari
H K Akerblom
L. Räsänen
M. Uhari
M. Dahl
P L Lähde
E. Pesonen
M. Pietikäinen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:119-25
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I
Apolipoproteins A - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Arteriosclerosis - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Risk
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The concentrations of apolipoproteins A-I and B were determined in 1,341 3- to 18-year-old children and adolescents from five urban and 12 rural communities. The analyses were made with radial immunodiffusion. The mean concentrations (+/- S.D.) of apo A-I and apo B were 152 +/- 25 and 94 +/- 22 mg/100 ml, respectively. 3-year-old children had the highest apo B levels which then decreased with advancing age in both sexes. Boys tended to have lower levels of apo B than girls. Apo A-I concentration was significantly higher in the 9- and 12-year-old boys than in the other age groups but showed no age-bound trend in girls. The apo A-I to apo B ratio increased with age in both sexes. The concentration of apo A-I was significantly lower, and that of apo B higher, in children living in eastern Finland in comparison with those from the western part of the country. This difference and a higher HDL-cholesterol to apo A-I ratio in both sexes in eastern Finland may be associated with the regional differences in the prevalence of coronary heart disease in this country.
PubMed ID
3937432 View in PubMed
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The effect of physical activity on serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations varies with apolipoprotein E phenotype in male children and young adults: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211627
Source
Metabolism. 1996 Jul;45(7):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
S. Taimela
T. Lehtimäki
K V Porkka
L. Räsänen
J S Viikari
Author Affiliation
Helsinki Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Metabolism. 1996 Jul;45(7):797-803
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apolipoproteins E - blood - genetics
Arteriosclerosis - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Cardiovascular diseases - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Diet
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Phenotype
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Apolipoprotein E (apo E) determines serum total (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterol concentrations and is thus associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We studied if the effect of physical activity (PA) on serum TC and LDL-C concentrations varies with apo E phenotype in a population-based sample of children and young adults with regular PA. The study cohort consisted of subjects aged 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 years in 1986 (N = 1,498) participating in a large multicenter study of cardiovascular risk factors in children and young adults. Serum lipid concentrations were determined enzymatically, and apo E phenotypes by isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting. The composition of the diet was determined by a 48-hour recall method, and a PA index was calculated on the basis of frequency, intensity, and duration of activity assessed by a questionnaire. LDL-C (P = .0082), TC (P = .014), and the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)/TC ratio (P = .0004) responses to exercise varied with apo E phenotype. The effect of PA on LDL-C, TC, or HDL/TC was not found in apo E phenotype E4/4. A moderate inverse effect of PA on TC and LDL-C and a positive effect on HDL/TC was found in subjects with E4/3 and E3/3 phenotypes. Similar but stronger associations were found between these variables within the group of E3/2 males. The effect of PA on serum lipid levels was strongest within the phenotype E3/2. These associations were not explained by dietary habits. Apo E phenotype partly determines the effect of PA on serum TC and LDL-C in Finnish male children and young adults with regular PA.
PubMed ID
8692011 View in PubMed
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Geographic origin of the family as a determinant of serum levels of lipids in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236944
Source
Circulation. 1986 Jun;73(6):1119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
E. Pesonen
J. Viikari
H K Akerblom
L. Räsänen
K. Louhivuori
S. Sarna
Source
Circulation. 1986 Jun;73(6):1119-26
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Risk
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Children in the eastern part of Finland have higher serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels than children in the western part of the country. This is consonant with the high mortality rate for coronary heart disease in eastern Finland. Eastern and western Finns are assumed to have different geographic origins; because of this we divided into groups 630 newborns and 3554 children and adolescents according to their grandparents' birthplace, which, in Finland, reflect the origins of the children. No differences in serum lipid levels were found in the newborns but in the 3- to 18-year-old children the differences in mean serum total and LDL cholesterol levels were accentuated by this division. Boys with grandparents from the extreme eastern part and those with grandparents from the western part of the country showed the greatest differences. Prepubescent boys 3 to 12 years old living in the west but with grandparents from the east had total and LDL cholesterol levels similar to those of boys living in and descended of grandparents from the east, despite their diet being of the western type. Thus, although diet is known to be a major determinant of serum cholesterol level, genetic factors also seem to play a role.
PubMed ID
3698246 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.