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Adipose tissue fatty acids as biomarkers of dietary exposure in Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24046
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
E. Thorling
M. Ewertz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Adipose tissue fatty acids, it has been proposed, reflect dietary intake. Using data from a validation study preceding a prospective study on diet, cancer, and health in Denmark, we were able to compare fatty acid profiles in adipose tissue biopsies from 86 individuals (23 men and 63 women) aged 40-64 y and dietary intake of fatty acids (as percentage of total fat) assessed by two 7-d weighed-diet records or by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Correlation coefficients (Pearson r) between fatty acid concentrations in adipose tissue biopsies (as percentage of total peak area) and dietary intake of fatty acid (percentage of total fat), determined from the diet records for men and women, respectively, were as follows: polyunsaturated fatty acids r = 0.74 and r = 0.46; n - 3 fatty acids of marine origin: eicosapentaenoic acid r = 0.15 and r = 0.61, and docosahexaenoic acid r = 0.47 and r = 0.57. Correlation coefficients obtained by using the food frequency questionnaire were slightly lower for most fatty acids.
PubMed ID
8480677 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100920
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2011
Author
J B Kornum
K M Due
M. Nørgaard
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
H T Sørensen
R W Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Date
Jun-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and pneumonia risk in healthy individuals is poorly understood. We examined 22,485 males and 24,682 females from Denmark who were aged 50-64 yrs. Subjects were without major chronic diseases at baseline and had median 12 yrs follow-up for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia. 1,091 (males) and 944 (females) had a pneumonia-related hospitalisation. Among males, the risk of pneumonia was increased for alcohol abstainers and those who drank large weekly amounts: Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 0, 7-20, 21-34, 35-50, and >50 drinks per week were 1.49 (95% CI 1.00-2.21), 0.88 (0.76-1.03), 0.87 (0.72-1.05), 1.15 (0.93-1.44), and 1.81 (1.40-2.33), respectively, compared with 1-6 drinks per week. The association between high alcohol intake and pneumonia persisted after controlling for subsequent chronic diseases. Among females, HRs for 0, 7-20, 21-35, and >35 drinks weekly were 1.26 (0.89-1.79), 1.01 (0.88-1.17), 1.10 (0.88-1.37), and 0.54 (0.29-1.01), respectively. For the same moderate to high weekly alcohol amount, infrequent intake yielded higher pneumonia HRs than more regular intake in both sexes. Regular moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased risk of hospitalisation for pneumonia. High weekly alcohol consumption in males and infrequent heavy drinking in both sexes may increase pneumonia risk.
PubMed ID
21659417 View in PubMed
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Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Diet, obesity and low physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22272
Source
APMIS Suppl. 1997;76:100-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J F Winther
L. Dreyer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society.
Source
APMIS Suppl. 1997;76:100-19
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - adverse effects
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity - complications
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the early 1980s, Doll and Peto estimated that about 35% of all deaths from cancer in the United States were attributable to dietary factors, with a margin of uncertainty ranging from 10 to 70%. Since then, several dietary factors, e.g. fat and meat, have been suggested to increase the risk for cancer, while other factors, e.g. fibre, fruit and vegetables, have been suggested to decrease the risk. The case-control and cohort studies have, however, given ambiguous results, and the overall evidence is far from conclusive. The major findings on dietary factors that increase risk have been reported from case-control studies, but have not been confirmed in large population-based cohort studies. Although the research in this area indicates that diet is important in cancer prevention, current knowledge does not allow reliable estimates of the numbers and proportions of cancers that could be avoided through well-described modifications of dietary habits. During the last 10 years, low physical activity has been pinpointed as a risk factor for cancers at various sites, especially the colon; however, the causal mechanism is still unknown. Obesity, defined as a body mass index of 30 or more, is consistently associated with endometrial and gall-bladder cancers in women and renal-cell cancer in both men and women. As the prevalence of obesity was between 5 and almost 20% in the Nordic populations in 1995, 625 cancer cases (310 endometrial cancers, 270 renal-cell cancers in men and women and 45 gall-bladder and bile-duct cancers among women) can be predicted in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 to be caused by obesity. This implies that about 1% of all cancers in Nordic women and less than 1% of those in Nordic men could be avoided around the year 2000 if a healthy body weight could be maintained by all inhabitants.
PubMed ID
9462823 View in PubMed
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Baseline patterns of adipose tissue fatty acids and long-term risk of breast cancer: a case-cohort study in the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264936
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
J A Schmidt
A. Gorst-Rasmussen
P W Nyström
J H Christensen
E B Schmidt
C. Dethlefsen
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
C C Dahm
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1088-94
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Subcutaneous Fat - chemistry
Abstract
The evidence regarding fatty acids and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. Adipose tissue fatty acids can be used as biomarkers of fatty acid intake and of endogenous fatty acid exposure. Fatty acids in adipose tissue are correlated owing to common dietary sources and shared metabolic pathways, which group fatty acids into naturally occurring patterns. We aimed to prospectively investigate associations between adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and long-term risk of total breast cancer and breast cancer subtypes characterised by oestrogen and progesterone receptor status (ER and PR).
This case-cohort study was based on data from the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health. At baseline, a fat biopsy and information on lifestyle and reproductive factors were collected. From the 31 original fatty acids measured, patterns of fatty acids were identified using the treelet transform. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 474 breast cancer cases were identified. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of risk of total breast cancer and of subtypes according to quintiles of factor score were determined by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression.
After adjustment for potential confounders, factor scores for the seven patterns identified by the treelet transform were not associated with risk of total breast cancer, nor with risk of ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours.
No clear associations between the patterns of fatty acids at baseline and long-term risk of total breast cancer or ER+, ER-, PR+ or PR- tumours were observed.
PubMed ID
24642780 View in PubMed
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Body composition and body fat distribution in relation to later risk of acute myocardial infarction: a Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137399
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
J G Stegger
E B Schmidt
T. Obel
T L Berentzen
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Jakob.Stegger@rn.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but lean body mass (LBM) may also be an important factor. Low LBM may increase the risk of MI and LBM may modify the effect of obesity on MI. Thus, the inability of the classical anthropometric measures to evaluate LBM may lead to misclassification of MI risk in both lean and obese persons. We investigated the associations between incident MI and bioelectrical impedance analyses (BIA) derived measures of body composition in combination with body mass index (BMI) and anthropometric measures of body fat distribution.
From 1993 to 1997, 27?148 men and 29?863 women, aged 50 to 64 year, were recruited into the Danish prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. During 11.9 years of follow-up we identified 2028 cases of incident MI (1487 men and 541 women). BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and BIA of body composition including body fat mass (BFM), body fat percentage and LBM were measured at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazard models with age as time axis and performed extensive control for confounding. Weight, BMI, classical estimates of abdominal obesity and BIA estimates of obesity showed significant positive associations with incident MI. However, BFM adjusted for WC showed no association. Low LBM was associated with a higher risk of incident MI in both genders, and high LBM was associated with a higher risk in men.
Obesity was positively associated with MI. Estimates of obesity achieved by BIA seemed not to add additional information to classical anthropometric measures regarding MI risk. Both high and low LBM may be positively associated with MI.
PubMed ID
21285940 View in PubMed
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Determinants of plasma alkylresorcinol concentration in Danish post-menopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140604
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;65(1):94-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
R. Landberg
A. Kamal-Eldin
P. Aman
J. Christensen
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
A. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agriculture Science, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden. rikard.landberg@lmv.slu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;65(1):94-101
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Bread
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Postmenopause
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Resorcinols - blood
Secale cereale - chemistry
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR), a group of phenolic lipids present in the outer parts of wheat and rye grain kernels, have been suggested as biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake. In this study, we investigated potential determinants of plasma AR concentration in a free-living population.
Non-fasting samples from post-menopausal women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study (n = 360) were selected. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) and the association between food items likely to contain AR and relevant non-dietary factors were studied by analysis of covariance models.
The median AR concentration was 78 nmol/l (interquartile range = 106.9 nmol/l). Intake of rye bread, identified as the main determinant, was associated with 87% higher plasma total AR concentration per 100 g of bread (95% confidence interval = 46-139%). About 8-12% of the total variation (depending on the AR homologue) in plasma AR concentration was explained by the selected dietary variables. At a nutrient level, total dietary fiber and cereal fiber were significantly associated with plasma total AR concentration (P = 0.05), but only ˜2% of the total plasma AR concentration was explained by the dietary fiber or cereal fiber intake.
In the studied population, AR plasma concentration was mainly affected by rye bread intake among investigated determinants.
PubMed ID
20859297 View in PubMed
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Development of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess food, energy and nutrient intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24666
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
J. Haraldsdóttir
M. Ewertz
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Arhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Foods to be included in a Danish self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were identified from food tables developed, together with data collected, for the survey 'Dietary habits in Denmark, 1985'. The questionnaire was to be used in a prospective study on diet, cancer and health, and the aim was to rank individuals with regard to intake of 19 different nutrients considered of prime importance in human carcinogenesis. The questionnaire for the dietary survey included 247 foods and recipes. From stepwise multiple regression analyses with the intake of each of the 19 nutrients as the dependent variable and the intake of the 247 foods and recipes as independent variables, the foods in the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability were considered for the final questionnaire. All relevant analyses were performed for the study group as a whole, for men and women separately, and in each gender for subgroups of energy intake. Taken together, the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability identified a total of 74 foods or recipes, which were important predictors of the intake of one or more of the nutrients considered. A few foods were excluded and a few foods were added to the final questionnaire based on common biological background information, and on information on foods providing important amounts of given nutrients, but which failed to contribute to regression analyses. The 92 foods and recipes, which were included in the final questionnaire provided altogether 81% of the average total supply of the nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1800428 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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Folate intake, alcohol and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9096
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;60(2):280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
A. Tjønneland
J. Christensen
A. Olsen
C. Stripp
S B Nissen
K. Overvad
B L Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, The Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. annet@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;60(2):280-6
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is consistent evidence that alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. It has been suggested that the increased risk associated with alcohol intake may be reduced by adequate intake of folate. Since many women consume alcohol, detection of a risk-reducing mechanism would have major public health implications. DESIGN: We therefore evaluated the possible interaction between alcohol and folate in a paired nested case-control study among postmenopausal women. SETTING: A total of 24 697 postmenopausal women were included in the 'Diet, Cancer and Health' follow-up study between December 1993 and May 1997. The cohort was followed until December 2000. The study included 388 cases of breast cancer and 388 randomly selected controls were used to estimate the breast cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) in conditional logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A previously established association between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer was present mainly among women with low folate intake. An IRR of 1.19 (95% CI: 0.99-1.42) per 10 g average daily alcohol intake was found for women with a daily folate intake below 300 mug, while among women with a folate intake higher than 350 mug, we could not show an association between the alcohol intake and the breast cancer incidence rate (e.g. folate intake >400 mug; IRR of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85-1.20)). CONCLUSION: The findings support the evidence that adequate folate intake may attenuate the risk of breast cancer associated with high alcohol intake. SPONSORSHIP: The Danish Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
16234832 View in PubMed
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Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122532
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1104-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
C P Hansen
T L Berentzen
J. Halkjær
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
M U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. cph@soci.au.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;66(10):1104-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products - adverse effects - analysis
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Meat - adverse effects - analysis
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Obesity - etiology
Overweight - etiology
Questionnaires
Ruminants - metabolism
Trans Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Follow-up studies have suggested that total intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) is a risk factor for gain in body weight and waist circumference (WC). However, in a cross-sectional study individual TFA isomers in adipose tissue had divergent associations with anthropometry. Our objective was to investigate the association between intake of TFA from ruminant dairy and meat products and subsequent changes in weight and WC. Furthermore, potential effect modification by sex, age, body mass index and WC at baseline was investigated.
Data on weight, WC, habitual diet and lifestyle were collected at baseline in a Danish cohort of 30,851 men and women aged 50-64 years. Follow-up information on weight and WC was collected 5 years after enrolment. The associations between intake of ruminant TFA (R-TFA) and changes in weight and WC were analysed using multiple linear regression with cubic spline modelling.
Intake of R-TFA, both absolute and energy-adjusted intake, was significantly associated with weight change. Inverse associations were observed at lower intakes with a levelling-off at intakes >1.2?g/day and 0.4 energy percentage (E %). Absolute, but not energy-adjusted, intake of R-TFA was significantly associated with WC change. An inverse association was observed at lower intakes with a plateau above an intake of 1.2?g/day.
The present study suggests that intake of R-TFA is weakly inversely associated with changes in weight, whereas no substantial association with changes in WC was found.
PubMed ID
22805493 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.