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Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96924
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tommy Cederholm
Kurt Boman
Mats Eliasson
Göran Hallmans
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. eva.warensjo@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Phospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of saturated fat have been associated with cardiovascular disease, and milk fat is rich in saturated fat. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the serum milk fat biomarkers pentadecanoic acid (15:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:0), and their sum (15:0+17:0) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: The study design was a prospective case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort in Sweden. Included in the study were 444 cases (307 men) and 556 controls (308 men) matched on sex, age, date of examination, and geographic region. Clinical, anthropometric, biomarker fatty acid, physical activity, and dietary data were collected. The odds of a first MI were investigated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: In women, proportions of milk fat biomarkers in plasma phospholipids were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
20484449 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128682
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Michael Edlinger
Susanne Strohmaier
Håkan Jonsson
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Wegene T Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Gabriele Nagel
Randi Selmer
Dorthe Johansen
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Hanno Ulmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults.
In the Me-Can project, 580?000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error.
During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n?=?348) and high-grade glioma (n?=?436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio?=?1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio?=?1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP.
Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
PubMed ID
22179083 View in PubMed
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Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136429
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 May;22(5):743-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Martin Almquist
Dorthe Johansen
Tone Björge
Hanno Ulmer
Björn Lindkvist
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Anders Engeland
Kilian Rapp
Håkan Jonsson
Randi Selmer
Guenter Diem
Christel Häggström
Steinar Tretli
Pär Stattin
Jonas Manjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital Lund and Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. martin.almquist@med.lu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 May;22(5):743-51
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - metabolism
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer.
A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a z score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression.
During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41-0.90), p trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer.
In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.
PubMed ID
21380729 View in PubMed
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Metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127036
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2012 May;125(2):330-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Hanno Ulmer
Tone Bjørge
Hans Concin
Annekatrin Lukanova
Jonas Manjer
Göran Hallmans
Wegene Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Martin Almquist
Håkan Jonsson
Randi Selmer
Pär Stattin
Steinar Tretli
Andrea Kleiner
Tanja Stocks
Gabriele Nagel
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2012 May;125(2):330-5
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - metabolism
Abstract
Little is known about the association between metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer carcinogenesis.
During mean follow-up of 11 years of the Me-Can cohort (N=288,834) 425 invasive cervical cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by the use of Cox proportional hazards regression models for quintiles and standardized z-scores (with a mean of 0 and a SD of 1) of BMI, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS score. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurements.
BMI (per 1SD increment) was associated with 12%, increase of cervical cancer risk, blood pressure with 25% and triglycerides with 39%, respectively. In models including all metabolic factors, the associations for blood pressure and triglycerides persisted. The metabolic syndrome (MetS) score was associated with 26% increased corrected risk of cervical cancer. Triglycerides were stronger associated with squamous cell carcinoma (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than with adenocarcinoma (0.92, 0.54-1.56). Among older women cholesterol (50-70 years 1.34; 1.00-1.81), triglycerides (50-70 years 1.49, 1.03-2.16 and =70 years 1.54, 1.09-2.19) and glucose (= 70 years 1.87, 1.13-3.11) were associated with increased cervical cancer risk.
The presence of obesity, elevated blood pressure and triglycerides were associated with increased risk of cervical cancer.
PubMed ID
22330614 View in PubMed
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Prostate cancer, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes, among men with metabolic aberrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263416
Source
Epidemiology. 2014 Nov;25(6):823-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Christel Häggström
Tanja Stocks
Gabriele Nagel
Jonas Manjer
Tone Bjørge
Göran Hallmans
Anders Engeland
Hanno Ulmer
Björn Lindkvist
Randi Selmer
Hans Concin
Steinar Tretli
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Source
Epidemiology. 2014 Nov;25(6):823-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Cholesterol - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - metabolism - mortality
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Few previous studies of metabolic aberrations and prostate cancer risk have taken into account the fact that men with metabolic aberrations have an increased risk of death from causes other than prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to calculate, in a real-life scenario, the risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes.
In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project, prospective data on body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 285,040 men. Risks of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes were calculated by use of competing risk analysis for men with normal (bottom 84%) and high (top 16%) levels of each factor, and a composite score.
During a mean follow-up period of 12 years, 5,893 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, 1,013 died of prostate cancer, and 26,328 died of other causes. After 1996, when prostate-specific antigen testing was introduced, men up to age 80 years with normal metabolic levels had 13% risk of prostate cancer, 2% risk of prostate cancer death, and 30% risk of death from other causes, whereas men with metabolic aberrations had corresponding risks of 11%, 2%, and 44%.
In contrast to recent studies using conventional survival analysis, in a real-world scenario taking risk of competing events into account, men with metabolic aberrations had lower risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, similar risk of prostate cancer death, and substantially higher risk of death from other causes compared with men who had normal metabolic levels.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25207955 View in PubMed
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