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Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269845
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anne Marie Trauelsen
Sarah Bendall
Jens Einar Jansen
Hanne-Grethe Lyse Nielsen
Marlene Buch Pedersen
Christopher Høier Trier
Ulrik H Haahr
Erik Simonsen
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child Abuse - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Male
Psychopathology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis.
Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire.
Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p
PubMed ID
25868932 View in PubMed
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