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Gas, dust, and fumes exposure is associated with mite sensitization and with asthma in mite-sensitized adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269308
Source
Allergy. 2015 May;70(5):604-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
A. Bjerg
E P Rönmark
S. Hagstad
J. Eriksson
M. Andersson
G. Wennergren
K. Torén
L. Ekerljung
Source
Allergy. 2015 May;70(5):604-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology - immunology
Dust
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Mites - immunology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of asthma and eczema. We investigated the role of sensitization in the association between GDF and allergic conditions. A population-based sample of 788 adults from the West Sweden Asthma Study completed questionnaires and skin prick tests. After adjustment for confounders, GDF exposure was associated with a doubled risk of sensitization to mites, but not with other allergens. Mite sensitization also modified the effect of GDF on asthma. In mite-sensitized subjects, GDF was associated with physician-diagnosed asthma, adjusted OR 2.9 (1.2-7.2), and with wheeze, OR 2.4 (1.1-5.3). In non-mite-sensitized subjects, the corresponding ORs were 1.1 (0.5-2.6) and 0.6 (0.3-1.3). GDF was independently associated with eczema regardless of mite sensitization, but not with rhinitis. These novel findings suggest that components of GDF may act as adjuvants that facilitate sensitization to mites and that mite-sensitized individuals may be especially susceptible to inhalant occupational exposures.
PubMed ID
25640536 View in PubMed
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