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Temperature as a key driver of ecological sorting among invasive pest species in the tropical Andes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95489
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Oct;18(7):1795-809
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Dangles O.
Carpio C.
Barragan A R
Zeddam J L
Silvain J F
Author Affiliation
Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratorio de Entomología, Quito, Ecuador. dangles@legs.cnrs-gif.fr
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Oct;18(7):1795-809
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Demography
Ecuador
Larva - physiology
Moths - physiology
Ovum - physiology
Pupa - physiology
Temperature
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Invasive species are a major threat to the sustainable provision of ecosystem products and services, both in natural and agricultural ecosystems. To understand the spatial arrangement of species successively introduced into the same ecosystem, we examined the tolerance to temperature and analyzed the field distribution of three potato tuber moths (PTM, Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), that were introduced in Ecuador since the 1980s. We studied physiological responses to constant temperatures of the three PTM species under laboratory conditions and modeled consequences for their overall population dynamics. We then compared our predictions to field abundances of PTM adults collected in 42 sites throughout central Ecuador. Results showed that the three PTM species differed with respect to their physiological response to temperature. Symmetrischema tangolias was more cold tolerant while Tecia solanivora had the highest growth rates at warmer temperatures. Phthorimaea operculella showed the poorest physiological performance across the range of tested temperatures. Overall, field distributions agree with predictions based on physiological experiments and life table analyses. At elevations >3000 m, the most cold-tolerant species, S. tangolias, was typically dominant and often the only species present. This species may therefore represent a biological sensor of climate change. At low elevations (
PubMed ID
18839773 View in PubMed
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