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Differences and Similarities in the Clinicopathological Features of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in China and the United States: A Multicenter Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270093
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Feb;95(7):e2836
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Li-Ming Zhu
Laura Tang
Xin-Wei Qiao
Edward Wolin
Nicholas N Nissen
Deepti Dhall
Jie Chen
Lin Shen
Yihebali Chi
Yao-Zong Yuan
Qi-Wen Ben
Bin Lv
Ya-Ru Zhou
Chun-Mei Bai
Yu-Li Song
Tian-Tian Song
Chong-Mei Lu
Run Yu
Yuan-Jia Chen
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Feb;95(7):e2836
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The presentation, pathology, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in Asian patients have not been studied in large cohorts. We hypothesized that the clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese patients might be different from those of US patients. The objectives of this study were to address whether PNETs in Chinese patients exhibit unique clinicopathological features and natural history, and can be graded and staged using the WHO/ENETS criteria.This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients with PNETs in multiple academic medical centers in China (7) and the United States (2). Tumor grading and staging were based on WHO/ENETS criteria. The clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese and US patients were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find associations between survival and patient demographics, tumor grade and stage, and other clinicopathological characteristics.A total of 977 (527 Chinese and 450 US) patients with PNETs were studied. In general, Chinese patients were younger than US patients (median age 46 vs 56 years). In Chinese patients, insulinomas were the most common (52.2%), followed by nonfunctional tumors (39.7%), whereas the order was reversed in US patients. Tumor grade distribution was similar in the 2 countries (G1: 57.5% vs 55.0%; G2: 38.5% vs 41.3%; and G3: 4.0% vs 3.7%). However, age, primary tumor size, primary tumor location, grade, and stage of subtypes of PNETs were significantly different between the 2 countries. The Chinese nonfunctional tumors were significantly larger than US ones (median size 4 vs 3?cm) and more frequently located in the head/neck region (54.9% vs 34.8%). The Chinese and US insulinomas were similar in size (median 1.5?cm) but the Chinese insulinomas relatively more frequently located in the head/neck region (48.3% vs 26.1%). Higher grade, advanced stage, metastasis, and larger primary tumor size were significantly associated with unfavorable survival in both countries.Several clinicopathological differences are found between Chinese and US PNETs but the PNETs of both countries follow a similar natural history. The WHO tumor grading and ENETS staging criteria are applicable to both Chinese and US patients.
PubMed ID
26886644 View in PubMed
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Mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence variations and population structure of Siberian chipmunk (Tamias sibiricus) in Northeastern Asia and population substructure in South Korea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91659
Source
Mol Cells. 2008 Dec 31;26(6):566-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-2008
Author
Lee Mu-Yeong
Lissovsky Andrey A
Park Sun-Kyung
Obolenskaya Ekaterina V
Dokuchaev Nikolay E
Zhang Ya-Ping
Yu Li
Kim Young-Jun
Voloshina Inna
Myslenkov Alexander
Choi Tae-Young
Min Mi-Sook
Lee Hang
Author Affiliation
Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife, Brain Korea 21 Program for Veterinary Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.
Source
Mol Cells. 2008 Dec 31;26(6):566-75
Date
Dec-31-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
China
Cytochromes b - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - chemistry - genetics
Genetics, Population
Geography
Korea
Phylogeny
Russia
Sciuridae - genetics
Abstract
Twenty-five chipmunk species occur in the world, of which only the Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus, inhabits Asia. To investigate mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence variations and population structure of the Siberian chipmunk in northeastern Asia, we examined mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences (1140 bp) from 3 countries. Analyses of 41 individuals from South Korea and 33 individuals from Russia and northeast China resulted in 37 haplotypes and 27 haplotypes, respectively. There were no shared haplotypes between South Korea and Russia--northeast China. Phylogenetic trees and network analysis showed 2 major maternal lineages for haplotypes, referred to as the S and R lineages. Haplotype grouping in each cluster was nearly coincident with its geographic affinity. In particular, 3 distinct groups were found that mostly clustered in the northern, central and southern parts of South Korea. Nucleotide diversity of the S lineage was twice that of lineage R. The divergence between S and R lineages was estimated to be 2.98-0.98 Myr. During the ice age, there may have been at least 2 refuges in South Korea and Russia--northeast China. The sequence variation between the S and R lineages was 11.3% (K2P), which is indicative of specific recognition in rodents. These results suggest that T. sibiricus from South Korea could be considered a separate species. However, additional information, such as details of distribution, nuclear genes data or morphology, is required to strengthen this hypothesis.
PubMed ID
18852526 View in PubMed
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Modification of Hexachlorobenzene to Molecules with Lower Long-Range Transport Potentials Using 3D-QSAR Models with a Full Factor Experimental Design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298903
Source
Adv Mar Biol. 2018; 81:129-165
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Meijin Du
Wenwen Gu
Xixi Li
Fuqiang Fan
Yu Li
Author Affiliation
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China.
Source
Adv Mar Biol. 2018; 81:129-165
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Hexachlorobenzene - chemistry
Hydrology
Molecular Docking Simulation
Molecular Structure
Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship
Research Design
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry
Abstract
In this study, the hexachlorobenzene molecule was modified by three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models and a full factor experimental design to obtain new hexachlorobenzene molecules with low migration ability. The 3D-QSAR models (comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA)) were constructed by SYBLY-X 2.0 software, using experimental data of octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) for 12 chlorobenzenes (CBs) congeners as the dependent variable, and the structural parameters of CBs as independent variables, respectively. A target molecule (hexachlorobenzene; HCB: its long-distance migration capability leads to pollution of the marine environment in Antarctic and Arctic) was modified using the 3D-QSAR contour maps associated with resolution V of the 210-3 full-factorial experimental design method, and 11 modified HCB molecules were produced with a single chlorine atom (-Cl2) and three chlorine atoms (-Cl1, -Cl3, and -Cl5) replaced with electropositive groups (-COOH, -CN, -CF3, -COF, -NO2, -F, -CHF2, -ONO2, and -SiF3) to increase the logKOA. The new molecules had essentially similar biological enrichment functions and toxicities as HCB but were found to be more easily degraded. A 2D-QSAR model and molecular docking technology indicated that both dipole moments and highest occupied orbital energies of the substituents markedly affected migration and degradation of the new molecules. The abilities of the compounds to undergo long distance migration were assessed. The modified HCB molecules (i.e. 2-CN-HCB, 2-CF3-HCB, 1-F-3-COOH-5-NO2-HCB, 1-NO2-3-CN-5-CHF2-HCB and 1-CN-3-F-5-NO2-HCB) moved from a long-range transport potential of the modified molecules to a relatively low mobility class, and the transport potentials of the remaining modified HCB molecules (i.e. 2-COOH-HCB, 2-COF-HCB, 1-COF-3-ONO2-5-NO2-HCB, 1-F-3-CN-5-SiF3-HCB, 1-F-3-COOH-5-SiF3-HCB and 1-CN-3-SiF3-5-ONO2-HCB) also significantly decreased. These results provide a basic theoretical basis for designing environmentally benign molecules based on HCB.
PubMed ID
30471655 View in PubMed
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Novel Orthopoxvirus Infection in an Alaska Resident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289944
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Jun-15-2017
Author
Yuri P Springer
Christopher H Hsu
Zachary R Werle
Link E Olson
Michael P Cooper
Louisa J Castrodale
Nisha Fowler
Andrea M McCollum
Cynthia S Goldsmith
Ginny L Emerson
Kimberly Wilkins
Jeffrey B Doty
Jillybeth Burgado
JinXin Gao
Nishi Patel
Matthew R Mauldin
Mary G Reynolds
Panayampalli S Satheshkumar
Whitni Davidson
Yu Li
Joseph B McLaughlin
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Anchorage.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Jun 15; 64(12):1737-1741
Date
Jun-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
DNA, Viral - blood
Female
Fomites - virology
Humans
Mammals - virology
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Orthopoxvirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Phylogeny
Poxviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skin - pathology - virology
Abstract
Human infection by orthopoxviruses is being reported with increasing frequency, attributed in part to the cessation of smallpox vaccination and concomitant waning of population-level immunity. In July 2015, a female resident of interior Alaska presented to an urgent care clinic with a dermal lesion consistent with poxvirus infection. Laboratory testing of a virus isolated from the lesion confirmed infection by an Orthopoxvirus.
The virus isolate was characterized by using electron microscopy and nucleic acid sequencing. An epidemiologic investigation that included patient interviews, contact tracing, and serum testing, as well as environmental and small-mammal sampling, was conducted to identify the infection source and possible additional cases.
Neither signs of active infection nor evidence of recent prior infection were observed in any of the 4 patient contacts identified. The patient's infection source was not definitively identified. Potential routes of exposure included imported fomites from Azerbaijan via the patient's cohabiting partner or wild small mammals in or around the patient's residence. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the virus represents a distinct and previously undescribed genetic lineage of Orthopoxvirus, which is most closely related to the Old World orthopoxviruses.
Investigation findings point to infection of the patient after exposure in or near Fairbanks. This conclusion raises questions about the geographic origins (Old World vs North American) of the genus Orthopoxvirus. Clinicians should remain vigilant for signs of poxvirus infection and alert public health officials when cases are suspected.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28329402 View in PubMed
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Prediction of octanol-air partition coefficients for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using 3D-QSAR models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267503
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2015 Oct 30;124:202-212
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2015
Author
Ying Chen
Xiaoyu Cai
Long Jiang
Yu Li
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2015 Oct 30;124:202-212
Date
Oct-30-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Based on the experimental data of octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) for 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, two types of QSAR methods, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), are used to establish 3D-QSAR models using the structural parameters as independent variables and using logKOA values as the dependent variable with the Sybyl software to predict the KOA values of the remaining 190 PCB congeners. The whole data set (19 compounds) was divided into a training set (15 compounds) for model generation and a test set (4 compounds) for model validation. As a result, the cross-validation correlation coefficient (q(2)) obtained by the CoMFA and CoMSIA models (shuffled 12 times) was in the range of 0.825-0.969 (>0.5), the correlation coefficient (r(2)) obtained was in the range of 0.957-1.000 (>0.9), and the SEP (standard error of prediction) of test set was within the range of 0.070-0.617, indicating that the models were robust and predictive. Randomly selected from a set of models, CoMFA analysis revealed that the corresponding percentages of the variance explained by steric and electrostatic fields were 23.9% and 76.1%, respectively, while CoMSIA analysis by steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic fields were 0.6%, 92.6%, and 6.8%, respectively. The electrostatic field was determined as a primary factor governing the logKOA. The correlation analysis of the relationship between the number of Cl atoms and the average logKOA values of PCBs indicated that logKOA values gradually increased as the number of Cl atoms increased. Simultaneously, related studies on PCB detection in the Arctic and Antarctic areas revealed that higher logKOA values indicate a stronger PCB migration ability. From CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps, logKOA decreased when substituents possessed electropositive groups at the 2-, 3-, 3'-, 5- and 6- positions, which could reduce the PCB migration ability. These results are expected to be beneficial in predicting logKOA values of PCB homologues and derivatives and in providing a theoretical foundation for further elucidation of the global migration behaviour of PCBs.
PubMed ID
26524653 View in PubMed
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