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Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279568
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2017
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan 20;
Date
Jan-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L(-1). An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg(-1) of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
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Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297771
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada. Boris.Tartakovsky@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors - microbiology
Carbon - metabolism
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrolysis
Equipment Design
Methane - biosynthesis
Sewage - chemistry
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L-1. An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg-1 of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dynamic model of a municipal wastewater stabilization pond in the arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294145
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-01-2018
Author
Didac Recio-Garrido
Yehuda Kleiner
Andrew Colombo
Boris Tartakovsky
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada.
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Date
11-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are the method of choice for sewage treatment in most arctic communities because they can operate in extreme climate conditions, require a relatively modest investment, are passive and therefore easy and inexpensive to operate and maintain. However, most arctic WSPs are currently limited in their ability to remove carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia-nitrogen. An arctic WSP differs from a 'southern' WSP in the way it is operated and in the conditions under which it operates. Consequently, existing WSP models cannot be used to gain better understanding of the arctic lagoon performance. This work describes an Arctic-specific WSP model. It accounts for both aerobic and anaerobic degradation pathways of organic materials and considers the periodic nature of WSP operation as well as the partial or complete freeze of the water in the WSP during winter. A uniform, multi-layer (ice, aerobic, anaerobic and sludge) approach was taken in the model development, which simplified and expedited numerical solution of the model, enabling efficient model calibration to available field data.
PubMed ID
30064078 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dynamic model of a municipal wastewater stabilization pond in the arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298048
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-01-2018
Author
Didac Recio-Garrido
Yehuda Kleiner
Andrew Colombo
Boris Tartakovsky
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada.
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Date
11-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ammonia - metabolism
Anaerobiosis
Arctic Regions
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Ice
Models, Theoretical
Ponds
Sewage
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are the method of choice for sewage treatment in most arctic communities because they can operate in extreme climate conditions, require a relatively modest investment, are passive and therefore easy and inexpensive to operate and maintain. However, most arctic WSPs are currently limited in their ability to remove carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia-nitrogen. An arctic WSP differs from a 'southern' WSP in the way it is operated and in the conditions under which it operates. Consequently, existing WSP models cannot be used to gain better understanding of the arctic lagoon performance. This work describes an Arctic-specific WSP model. It accounts for both aerobic and anaerobic degradation pathways of organic materials and considers the periodic nature of WSP operation as well as the partial or complete freeze of the water in the WSP during winter. A uniform, multi-layer (ice, aerobic, anaerobic and sludge) approach was taken in the model development, which simplified and expedited numerical solution of the model, enabling efficient model calibration to available field data.
PubMed ID
30064078 View in PubMed
Less detail