Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283404
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-13-2017
Author
Kiley Daley
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Jenny L Hayward
Greg S Piorkowski
Wendy Krkosek
Graham A Gagnon
Heather Castleden
Kristen MacNeil
Joanna Poltarowicz
Emmalina Corriveau
Amy Jackson
Justine Lywood
Yannan Huang
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 13;
Date
Jun-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.
PubMed ID
28612312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297661
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Kiley Daley
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Jenny L Hayward
Greg S Piorkowski
Wendy Krkosek
Graham A Gagnon
Heather Castleden
Kristen MacNeil
Joanna Poltarowicz
Emmalina Corriveau
Amy Jackson
Justine Lywood
Yannan Huang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chlorine - analysis
Disinfection - methods
Drinking Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Family Characteristics
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Halogenation
Humans
Nunavut
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Water Quality
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.
PubMed ID
28612312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281067
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2017
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Date
Mar-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297766
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Disinfection - methods
Environmental Biomarkers
Escherichia coli
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes
Nunavut
Ponds - microbiology
Salmonella
Seasons
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
Less detail