Skip header and navigation

Refine By

37 records – page 1 of 4.

[All adopted children should be HIV tested]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8433
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Dec 13;86(50):4408, 4411-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1989
Author
P. Bendtsen
L A Proos
Y. Hofvander
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Dec 13;86(50):4408, 4411-2
Date
Dec-13-1989
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - legislation & jurisprudence
Child
Child, Preschool
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Sweden
PubMed ID
2601503 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
World Health Forum. 1995;16(1):95-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
Y. Hofvander
C. Hillervik
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
World Health Forum. 1995;16(1):95-9
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals, Maternity - trends
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Organizational Policy
Program Development - methods
Sweden
United Nations
PubMed ID
7873039 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Breast feeding is not a decree from the National Board of Health and Welfare]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61908
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Sep 24;94(39):3379
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-1997
Author
N. Rehnqvist
P G Swartling
Y. Hofvander
C. Sundelin
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Sep 24;94(39):3379
Date
Sep-24-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
9379803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breastfeeding patterns in exclusively breastfed infants: a longitudinal prospective study in Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52592
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Feb;88(2):203-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A. Hörnell
C. Aarts
E. Kylberg
Y. Hofvander
M. Gebre-Medhin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. ICH.sekretariat@ich.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Feb;88(2):203-11
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Catchment Area (Health)
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Age
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sucking Behavior - physiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Exclusive breastfeeding was studied among 506 infants in Uppsala, Sweden, based on daily recordings during the first 6 mo. The mothers had previously breastfed at least one infant for at least 4 mo. Most of the mothers considered that they breastfed on demand. Wide variations in breastfeeding frequency and suckling duration were found both between different infants and in the individual infant over time. At 2 wk, the mean frequency of daytime feeds (based on one 13-d record) between different infants ranged from 2.9 to 10.8 and night-time feeds from 1.0 to 5.1. The daytime suckling duration (based on one 24-h record) ranged from 20 min to 4h 35 min and night-time duration from 0 to 2h 8 min. At any given age, a maximum of only 2% of the infants were not breastfed during the night. At 4 mo, 95% of the infants were breastfeeding and 40% were exclusively breastfed at this age. Longer breastfeeding duration and longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding were both associated with higher frequency of breastfeeds, longer breastfeeding of the previous child and higher education. No gender differences were found. Maternal smoking was associated with shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and pacifier use was associated with shorter duration of both exclusive breastfeeding and total breastfeeding. This study confirms that every mother-infant pair needs to be understood as a unique dyad throughout lactation. These data demonstrate a wide range of patterns among women who are exclusively breastfeeding and indicate that it would be inappropriate to put pressure on individual families to adopt preconceived patterns of infant feeding.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 1999 Dec;88(12):1412-310626534
PubMed ID
10102156 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breastfeeding patterns in relation to thumb sucking and pacifier use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58836
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Oct;104(4):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
C. Aarts
A. Hörnell
E. Kylberg
Y. Hofvander
M. Gebre-Medhin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. clara.aarts@ich.uu.se
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Oct;104(4):e50
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fingersucking
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Life tables
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sucking Behavior
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To analyze the influence of thumb sucking and pacifier use on breastfeeding patterns in exclusively breastfed infants, on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and on the total breastfeeding duration. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, longitudinal, prospective study. SETTING: The subjects were recruited from a population of 15 189 infants born in the maternity ward at the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden between May 1989 and December 1992. STUDY POPULATION: 506 mother-infant pairs. METHODS: Daily recordings by the mothers on infant feeding from the first week after delivery through the duration of the study. Fortnightly home visits with structured interviews by a research assistant. RESULTS: Pacifier use was associated with fewer feeds and shorter suckling duration per 24 hours, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and shorter total breastfeeding duration compared with no pacifier use. These associations were not found for thumb sucking. The possible negative effects of pacifiers on breastfeeding seemed to be related to the frequency of their use. Maternal age and education only slightly modified the association between pacifier use and breastfeeding duration. CONCLUSIONS: More frequent use of a pacifier was associated with shorter breastfeeding duration, even among a group of mothers who were highly motivated to breastfeed. breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding pattern, exclusive breastfeeding, pacifier use, thumb sucking.
PubMed ID
10506275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast feeding trends and recent information activities in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60686
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
Y. Hofvander
S. Sjölin
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:122-5
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Sweden
Abstract
The breast feeding rate has been declining steadily in Sweden since the 1930's up to the early 1970's. It is suggested that this was linked to the changing role of women, the development towards the nuclear family, the changing way of living, the influence of strict routines at the maternities and many other factors. A Committee was appointed in 1973 by the National Board of Health and Welfare, which initiated a number of breast feeding promoting activities: the editing of a Manual for health personnel, and booklets for mothers, the systematic arranging of workshops for key personnel in each county, stimulation to more flexible and breast feeding favouring maternity routines, backing of working groups of La Leche League-type, etc. Coinciding with these activities and probably a result of changed breast feeding attitudes among mothers, the breast feeding rate has increased considerably--at 2 months from an all time low of 31% in 1972 to 62% in 1976/77, and at 6 months from 6% to 20%.
PubMed ID
291284 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast milk composition in Ethiopian and Swedish mothers. I. Vitamin A and beta-carotene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60861
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1976 Apr;29(4):441-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1976
Author
M. Gebre-Medhin
A. Vahlquist
Y. Hofvander
L. Uppsäll
B. Vahlquist
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1976 Apr;29(4):441-51
Date
Apr-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carotenoids - metabolism
Colostrum - metabolism
Ethiopia
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lactation
Middle Aged
Milk, Human - metabolism
Prealbumin - metabolism
Pregnancy
Retinol-Binding Proteins - metabolism
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Vitamin A - metabolism - secretion
Abstract
The vitamin A and beta-carotene contents of breast milk were determined at different stages of lactation in three population groups: nonprivileged Ethiopian, privileged Ethiopian, and Swedish mothers. In addition, a fractionation of vitamin A giving the proportion of retinol was performed. The concentrations of retinol-binding protein (RBP) and (in part of the material) beta-carotene and prealbumin in plasma were also measured. The mean concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene in the milk from the Swedish mothers (period 0.5 to 6.5 months) were in the range of 40.0 to 53.1 and 16.3 to 20.8 mug/100 ml, respectively. For the privileged Ethiopian mothers (period 0.5 to 3.5 months) the corresponding ranges were 36.2 to 36.4 and 26.2 to 28.1 mug/100 ml and for the nonprivileged Ethiopian mothers (period 0.5 to 6.5 months) 28.1 to 33.1 and 23.9 to 25.6 mug/100 ml. Only the nonprivileged Ethiopian mothers were examined during a later stage of lactation (6.5 to 11.5 and 11.5 to 23.5 months). The concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene in their milk showed a downward trend. The proportion of retinyl ester (percentage of total vitamin A content) was significantly higher in the milk of Swedish mothers than in privileged and nonprivileged Ethiopian mothers. In the Swedish mothers retinol constituted 3.5% of the total vitamin A content of the milk; in Ethiopian mothers it was 15 to 30%. Determination of RBP in plasma showed normal values for Swedish mothers and lowered values for Ethiopian mothers--particularly the nonprivileged, in whom 14 of 81 values were below 20 mug/ml. RBP was demonstrated in colostrum, but only in a low concentration (in the order of 5 mug/ml).
PubMed ID
944526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's deaths and population growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36814
Source
Lancet. 1992 Feb 8;339(8789):377-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-1992
Author
U B Lithell
H. Rosling
Y. Hofvander
Source
Lancet. 1992 Feb 8;339(8789):377-8
Date
Feb-8-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth rate
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Mortality
Nigeria
Population Growth
Sweden
PubMed ID
1346463 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Circumcision of boys--a child's right versus parents' right]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58740
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2598-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2000
Author
Y. Hofvander
L. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, båda Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2598-604
Date
May-24-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Circumcision - adverse effects - history - psychology
English Abstract
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Islam - history
Judaism - history
Legislation, Medical
Male
Patient Advocacy
Religion and Medicine
World Health
Abstract
Male circumcision was practiced long before Abraham established a covenant with God to the effect that he should circumcize himself and all male members of his house. Thereafter it has become a potent religion-ethnic commandment also in the Islamic world, although it is not mentioned in the Koran. Several million boys are circumcised yearly in for instance traditional Africa and the USA (in the USA originally as prophylaxis against masturbation). In Sweden the yearly figure is some 3000 boys. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals that there are no or only marginal medical benefits of the operation, particularly in view of the fact that up to 10% suffer complications, and also that newborns both experience pain and will respond more strongly to new pain stimuli for years to come. There are two opposing interests--those related to the religious tradition and those related to the welfare of the child as expressed in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
PubMed ID
10881519 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Circumcision--Sweden as (questionable) international model]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32316
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):474
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2001
Author
Y. Hofvander
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):474
Date
Jan-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Welfare
Circumcision
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 21;98(8):87011265578
PubMed ID
11229098 View in PubMed
Less detail

37 records – page 1 of 4.