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Age- and Gender-Specific Familial Risks for Venous Thromboembolism: A Nationwide Epidemiological Study Based on Hospitalizations in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101278
Source
Circulation. 2011 Aug 8;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2011
Author
Bengt Zöller
Xinjun Li
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Circulation. 2011 Aug 8;
Date
Aug-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background- This nationwide study sought to determine age- and gender-specific familial risks in siblings hospitalized for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods and Results- The Swedish Multigeneration Register on 0- to 75-year-old subjects was linked to the Hospital Discharge Register for the years 1987-2007. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for individuals whose siblings were hospitalized for VTE compared with those whose siblings were not affected. Among a total of 45 362 hospitalized cases with VTE, 2393 affected siblings were identified, with a familial standardized incidence ratio of 2.45 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 3.61). Gender-specific differences in incidence rates were observed. The familial risks were significantly increased from the age of 10 to 69 years, with a familial standardized incidence ratio of 4.77 (95% CI, 1.96 to 10.83) at ages 10 to 19 years, which decreased to 2.08 (95% CI, 1.35 to 3.20) at ages 60 to 69 years, although the absolute risk increased with age. The familial standardized incidence ratios for siblings with 2 and =3 affected probands were 51.87 (95% CI, 31.47 to 85.00) and 53.69 (95% CI, 25.59 to 108.50), respectively. Spouses had low familial risks (standardized incidence ratio=1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.10; observed spouse cases=3900). Conclusions- Familial factors, although influenced by age and gender, are important risk factors for VTE. The present study shows that VTE is aggregated in families and suggests that uncovering the sources of familial aggregation (genetic and nongenetic) may be worthwhile. Moreover, in a small fraction of siblings, the familial risk was very high, suggesting segregation of rare but strong genetic risk factors.
PubMed ID
21824919 View in PubMed
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Age-and sex-specific seasonal variation of venous thromboembolism in patients with and without family history: a nationwide family study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107143
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bengt Zöller
Xinjun Li
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Dr. Bengt Zöller, Center for Primary Health Care Research, CRC, Building 28, Floor 11, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden, Tel.: +46 70 6691476, Fax: +46 40 391370, E-mail: bengt.zoller@med.lu.se 
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Risk
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Seasonal variation in venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in individuals with familial predisposition to VTE has not been explored. This nationwide study aimed to determine whether there are age- and sex-specific seasonal differences in risk of hospitalisation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was linked to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1964-2010. Seasonal variation in first VTE events in 1987-2010 for individuals with and without a family history of VTE (siblings or parents) was determined by several independent methods. Stratified analyses were performed according to age, sex, and VTE subtype (pulmonary embolism [PE] or deep venous thrombosis [DVT]). Seasonal variation in VTE incidence, mostly with a peak during the winter, was observed in both sexes in individuals with and without family history with overall peak-to-low ratios (PLRs) of 1.15 and 1.21, respectively. The peak day was December 25 and February 1 for those with and without a family history of VTE, respectively. Seasonal variation was strongest among individuals aged >50 years. Among individuals aged 0-25 years with a family history, the peak for VTE was in July (PLR = 1.20). Significant seasonal variation was observed for PE and DVT with the exception of DVT among those with a family history (PLR = 1.01). In conclusion, our data support the presence of a modest seasonal variation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. However, young age and family history may modify and attenuate the effect of season on VTE.
PubMed ID
24048360 View in PubMed
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Age-specific familial risks for renal cell carcinoma with evidence on recessive heritable effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17710
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Female
Genes, Recessive
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Systematic comparisons of mode of inheritance for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have not been carried out. The occurrence of cancer in parents and offspring may be due to dominant causes, whereas cancer affecting only siblings may indicate a recessive causation. Environmental effects need to be excluded. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born after 1931 with their biologic parents, totaling 10.2 million persons. Cancer data were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry from years 1961 to 2000, included 2415 cases of RCC in offspring and 18531 in parents. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% CI limits were calculated for offspring whose parents or sibling were diagnosed with RCC. RESULTS: The SIRs for siblings for RCC depended on their age difference. SIR was 7.63 (95% CI 3.63-14.08) when the age difference was less than 3 years and compared to 3.43 (95% CI 1.77-6.02) for large age difference. SIRs for familial risk of RCC were 1.73 (95% CI 1.31-2.26) when a parent and 4.58 (95% CI 2.87-6.94) when a sibling had RCC. Age-specific analysis of familial RCC among siblings revealed maxima at ages 40 to 49 and 60 to 68 years. CONCLUSION: The findings in the present study offer evidence on recessive effects in early onset RCC.
PubMed ID
15149343 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation in immigrant groups: a cohort study of all adults 45 years of age and older in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290383
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 09; 32(9):785-796
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2017
Author
Per Wändell
Axel C Carlsson
Xinjun Li
Danijela Gasevic
Johan Ärnlöv
Martin J Holzmann
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. per.wandell@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 09; 32(9):785-796
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the association between country of birth and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in several immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included all adults (n = 3,226,752) aged 45 years and older in Sweden. AF was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis of AF in the National Patient Register. The incidence of AF in different immigrant groups, using Swedish-born as referents, was assessed by Cox regression, expressed in hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All models were stratified by sex and adjusted for age, geographical residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, and neighbourhood socioeconomic status. Compared to their Swedish-born counterparts, higher incidence of AF [HR (95% CI)] was observed among men from Bosnia 1.74 (1.56-1.94) and Latvia 1.29 (1.09-1.54), and among women from Iraq 1.96 (1.67-2.31), Bosnia 1.88 (1.61-1.94), Finland 1.14 (1.11-1.17), Estonia 1.14 (1.05-1.24) and Germany 1.08 (1.03-1.14). Lower incidence of AF was noted among men (HRs = 0.60) from Iceland, Southern Europe (especially Greece, Italy and Spain), Latin America (especially Chile), Africa, Asia (including Iraq, Turkey, Lebanon and Iran), and among women from Nordic countries (except Finland), Southern Europe, Western Europe (except Germany), Africa, North America, Latin America, Iran, Lebanon and other Asian countries (except Turkey and Iraq). In conclusion, we observed substantial differences in incidence of AF between immigrant groups and the Swedish-born population. A greater awareness of the increased risk of AF development in some immigrant groups may enable for a timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention of its debilitating complications, such as stroke.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28702880 View in PubMed
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Cancer of unknown primary is associated with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278670
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2016 May;25(3):246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Kari Hemminki
Asta Försti
Kristina Sundquist
Xinjun Li
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2016 May;25(3):246-51
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diabetes Complications - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Unknown Primary - epidemiology
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidences of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and T2D are increasing worldwide. T2D is associated with many cancers. However, no data are available on cancer of unknown primary (CUP), a relatively common, fatal cancer for which tobacco smoking is the only known risk factor. At diagnosis, CUP metastases are found in various organs, which has implications for prognosis. We carried out a nationwide study on the association of CUP with T1D and T2D. 32?600 T1D patients and 178?000 T2D patients were identified from the national healthcare registers and these were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for CUP from 1997 through 2010 using anyone without diabetes as a reference. The SIR of CUP in 421 diabetic patients was 1.71, highest for CUP with liver (2.17) and respiratory system (1.95) metastases. The SIR was 2.91 for T1D, but with a small number of patients, 1.38 for T2D with insulin treatment, and 1.78 for the main group of T2D. CUP with liver and respiratory system metastases increased for each diabetic type; however, for T2D, CUP with gastrointestinal and bone metastases also increased. The results provide the first demonstration that CUP is one of the cancers associated with diabetes, with definite evidence on T2D. CUP has a poor prognosis, which may be even worse when diabetes is the underlying comorbidity. A mechanistic question for future work is to determine whether diabetes promotes primaries that escape detection or their metastatic spread.
PubMed ID
26011105 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19166
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology
Databases
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Netherlands - ethnology
North America - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse cancer risks in 613,000 adult immigrants to Sweden. All the immigrants had become parents in Sweden and their median age at immigration was 24 years for men and 22 years for women. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 18 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. Data were also available from compatriot marriages. All cancer was decreased by 5% and 8% for immigrant men and women, respectively. However, most of the male increase was due to lung cancer for which male immigrants showed a 41% excess. Among individual cancer sites and immigrant countries, 110 comparisons were significant, 62 showing protection and 48 an increased risk. Most of the differences between the rates in immigrants and Swedes could be ascribed to the variation of cancer incidence in the indigenous populations. Some high immigrant SIRs were 5.05 (n = 6, 95% CI 1.82-11.06) for stomach cancer in Rumanian women and 2.41 (41, 1.73-3.27) for lung cancer in Dutch men. At some sites, such as testis, prostate, skin (melanoma), kidney, cervix and nervous system, the SIRs for immigrants were decreased; in some groups of immigrants SIRs were about 0.20. The highest rates for testicular cancer were noted for Danes and Chileans. Women from Yugoslavia and Turkey had an excess of thyroid tumours. All immigrant groups showed breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers at or below the Swedish level but the differences were no more than 2-fold.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 20;101(3):298; author reply 29912209983
PubMed ID
11979437 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in second-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19165
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):229-37
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Female
Germany - ethnology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
North America - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scandinavia - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyze cancer risks in Sweden-born descendants of immigrants from European and North American countries. Our study included close to 600,000 0-66-year-old descendants of an immigrant father or mother. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 17 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. All cancer was marginally below the Swedish incidence in offspring of immigrant origin. Decreased SIRs were observed for breast cancer among Norwegian descendants, melanoma among descendants of Hungarian fathers and ovarian and bladder cancer among descendents of Finnish mothers, all consistent with the difference in cancer incidence between Swedes and the indigenous populations. Cervical cancer was increased in daughters of Danish men, whereas thyroid cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were in excess in offspring of parents of Yugoslav and Asian descent. Even these results agreed with the high incidence rates in parents compared to Swedes, except that for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma other explanations are needed; these may be related to immune malfunction. Comparison of the results between the first- and the second-generation immigrants suggest that the first 2 decades of life are important in setting the pattern for cancer development in subsequent life. Birth in Sweden sets the Swedish pattern for cancer incidence, irrespective of the nationality of descent, while entering Sweden in the 20s is already too late to influence the environmentally imprinted program for the cancer destiny.
PubMed ID
11979438 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in twins: results from the Swedish family-cancer database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19010
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Jun 20;99(6):873-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Jun 20;99(6):873-8
Date
Jun-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Genetic
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Twin studies on cancer have addressed two general questions, one about the possible carcinogenic effects of twinning and the second about heritable effects of cancer. The first question is answered by comparing the occurrence of cancer in twins to that in singletons; the second is answered in probandwise analysis of monozygotic twins compared to dizygotic twins or siblings. We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database on 10.2 million individuals and 62,574 0-66-year-old twins to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all main cancer compared to cancer in singletons. In probandwise analysis, the SIR was calculated for the co-twin of an affected twin. The overall risk of cancer in same or opposite sex twins was at the level of the risk for singletons. Testicular cancer was increased among same sex twins and all twins to an SIR of 1.43. Melanoma was decreased in these groups of twins to an SIR of 0.84. Some other cancer sites were increased or decreased in some groups of twins, but none in all twins. The SIR of breast cancer was 1.01 and 1.04 in same and opposite sex twins, respectively. Probandwise analysis showed increased risks for Hodgkin's disease in males and breast cancer and childhood acute lymphoid leukemia among females. The data on this unselected population of twins suggest that twinning per se is not a risk factor of cancer. However, because twins are smaller than singletons at birth, some possible effects could be masked by such differences. In utero hormonal exposures may be related to the risk of testicular cancer. The protective effects in melanoma may be due to socioeconomic factors.
PubMed ID
12115491 View in PubMed
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Country of origin and bariatric surgery in Sweden during 2001-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276847
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2015 Nov-Dec;11(6):1332-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ensieh Memarian
Kristina Sundquist
Susanna Calling
Jan Sundquist
Xinjun Li
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2015 Nov-Dec;11(6):1332-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Age Distribution - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Bariatric Surgery - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Bosnia and Herzegovina - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Female - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Forecasting - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Humans - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Incidence - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Lebanon - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Male - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Obesity, Morbid - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Prevalence - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Registries - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Risk Factors - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Sex Distribution - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Sweden - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Young Adult - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of obesity, as well as use of bariatric surgery, has increased worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential differences in the use of bariatric surgery among Swedes and immigrants in Sweden and whether the hypothesized differences remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors.
A closed cohort of all individuals aged 20-64 years was followed during 2001-2010. Further analyses were performed in 2 periods separately (2001-2005 and 2006-2010). Age-standardized cumulative incidence rates (CR) of bariatric surgery were compared between Swedes and immigrants considering individual variables. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate models for males and females.
A total of 12,791 Swedes and 2060 immigrants underwent bariatric surgery. The lowest rates of bariatric surgery were found in immigrant men. The largest difference in CR between Swedes and immigrants was observed among low-income individuals (3.4 and 2.3 per 1000 individuals, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were lower for all immigrants compared with Swedes in the second period. The highest HRs were observed among immigrants from Chile and Lebanon and the lowest among immigrants from Bosnia. Except for Nordic countries, immigrants from all other European countries had a lower HR compared with Swedes.
Men in general and some immigrant groups had a lower HR of bariatric surgery. Moreover, the difference between Swedes and immigrants was more pronounced in individuals with low socioeconomic status (income). It is unclear if underlying barriers to receive bariatric surgery are due to patients' preferences/lack of knowledge or healthcare structures. Future studies are needed to examine potential causes behind these differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25979207 View in PubMed
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Dementia and Alzheimer's disease risks in patients with autoimmune disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297589
Source
Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2018 Sep; 18(9):1350-1355
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Xinjun Li
Jan Sundquist
Bengt Zöller
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2018 Sep; 18(9):1350-1355
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Autoimmune Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Disease Progression
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate an association between autoimmune disorders (AID) and hospitalization for dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and to study whether the risk is associated with follow-up time and age.
We followed up all individuals in Sweden without previous hospital admission for dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and with a primary or secondary diagnosis of an AID between 1 January 1964 and 31 December 2010, in the Swedish National Patient Register for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The Swedish National Patient Register includes both inpatients and outpatients. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for dementia and Alzheimer's disease, adjusted for individual variables, including age, sex and comorbidities.
A total of 788 103 individuals were admitted to hospital because of an autoimmune disorder without previous dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Among a total of 42 conditions of AID, 9998 dementia and Alzheimer's disease patients were identified with a SIR of 1.28 (95% CI 1.26-1.31). A total of 17 showed an increased risk, and of those the remaining, 14 conditions were still at risk, when dementia and Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in the year of AID diagnosed were excluded. The risks depended on the age at hospitalization for dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
The present large study quantified the increased risks of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in patients with many types of AID. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 1350-1355.
PubMed ID
30044040 View in PubMed
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