Skip header and navigation

Refine By

26 records – page 1 of 3.

Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297760
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):67-77
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Yi-Qian Sun
Arnulf Langhammer
Chunsen Wu
Frank Skorpen
Yue Chen
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Pål Richard Romundstad
Xiao-Mei Mai
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine (IKOM), NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. yi-qian.sun@ntnu.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):67-77
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
29080012 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma, lung function and allergy in 12-year-old children with very low birth weight: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15260
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Jun;14(3):184-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Xiao-Mei Mai
Per-Olof Gäddlin
Lennart Nilsson
Orvar Finnström
Bengt Björkstén
Maria C Jenmalm
Ingemar Leijon
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. xiama@imk.liu.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Jun;14(3):184-92
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - etiology - physiopathology
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - complications - physiopathology
Child
Dermatitis, Atopic - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Spirometry
Sweden
Abstract
We assessed the relationship between very low birth weight (VLBW) (or= 9 days was the only remaining significant risk factor for a history of asthma (adjusted OR 6.7, 95%CI 1.0-44). The VLBW children who required mechanical ventilation during the neonatal period were more likely to have bronchial hyperresponsiveness than those not requiring mechanical ventilation (60% vs. 28%, p = 0.050). The spirometric values were similar among the VLBW and the term children at 12 years. Very low birth weight was not significantly related to allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, eczema or positive skin prick tests. Furthermore, the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma in stimulated cell cultures were similar in the VLBW and the term children. A history of asthma by 12 years of age was twice as common among the VLBW as the term children, and neonatal oxygen supplementation seemed to be associated with the increased risk. Furthermore, mechanical ventilation during the neonatal period was associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness at age 12. Very low birth weight per se was not, however, related to atopy.
PubMed ID
12787297 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cod liver oil intake and incidence of asthma in Norwegian adults--the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120716
Source
Thorax. 2013 Jan;68(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Xiao-Mei Mai
Arnulf Langhammer
Yue Chen
Carlos A Camargo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no
Source
Thorax. 2013 Jan;68(1):25-30
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Cod liver oil is an important source of vitamin D, but also contains other fat-soluble components such as vitamin A. Before 1999, the cod liver oil formula in Norway contained a high concentration of vitamin A (1000 µg per 5 ml). High vitamin A status is associated with increased risks of several chronic diseases.
To investigate the association between cod liver oil intake and asthma development.
In the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, a total of 25 616 Norwegian adults aged 19-55 years were followed up from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008. Current analysis based on 17 528 subjects who were free of asthma and had complete information on cod liver oil intake at baseline. Cod liver oil intake was defined as daily intake = 1 month during the year prior to baseline. Incident asthma was reported as new-onset asthma during the 11-year follow-up.
Of the 17 528 subjects, 18% (n=3076) consumed cod liver oil daily for = 1 month over the past year. Cod liver oil intake was significantly associated with incident asthma with an OR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) after adjustment for age, sex, daily smoking, physical activity, education, socio-economic status, family history of asthma, and body mass index (BMI). The positive association was consistent across age (
PubMed ID
22977130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and obesity in adults: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127248
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 15;175(10):1029-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2012
Author
Xiao-Mei Mai
Yue Chen
Carlos A Camargo
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 15;175(10):1029-36
Date
May-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - deficiency
Incidence
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Experimental studies suggest that vitamin D modulates the activity of adipocytes. The authors examined baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in relation to prevalent and cumulative incident obesity in Norway. A cohort of 25,616 adults aged 19-55 years participated in both the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)). Serum 25(OH)D levels measured at baseline and anthropometric measurements taken at both baseline and follow-up were available for a random sample of 2,460 subjects. Overall, 40% of the 2,460 subjects had a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L, and 37% had a level of 50.0-74.9 nmol/L. The prevalence and cumulative incidence of obesity, defined as body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) =30, were 12% and 15%, respectively. Lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity. In the 2,165 subjects with baseline BMI less than 30, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was associated with a significantly increased odds ratio for incident obesity during follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.41). When prevalent and incident obesity were classified according to waist circumference (=88 cm for women, =102 cm for men), similar results were obtained. In addition to prevalent obesity, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was significantly associated with new-onset obesity in adults.
PubMed ID
22312120 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in a Norwegian population: the HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256951
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Tricia L Larose
Yue Chen
Carlos A Camargo
Arnulf Langhammer
Pål Romundstad
Xiao-Mei Mai
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, , Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-70
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Blood Specimen Collection
Body mass index
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Seasons
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Vitamin D deficiency occurs worldwide. Winter season and high Body Mass Index (BMI) are associated with low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). We estimated the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a Norwegian adult population and examined factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. A cohort of 25,?616 adults (19-55 years) who participated in both the second and third Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)) was established in a previous study. A 10% random sample of the cohort population was recruited for serum 25(OH)D measurements (n=2584), which was used for the current cross-sectional study. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25(OH)D level
PubMed ID
24197920 View in PubMed
Less detail

General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123858
Source
Eur Respir J. 2013 Feb;41(2):323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Ben Brumpton
Arnulf Langhammer
Pål Romundstad
Yue Chen
Xiao-Mei Mai
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ben.brumpton@ntnu.no
Source
Eur Respir J. 2013 Feb;41(2):323-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI =30.0 kg·m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference =88 cm in females and =102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2013 Feb;41(2):253-423370797
PubMed ID
22653771 View in PubMed
Less detail

GOLD classifications and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114515
Source
Thorax. 2013 Oct;68(10):914-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Linda Leivseth
Ben Michael Brumpton
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Xiao-Mei Mai
Roar Johnsen
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), , Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Thorax. 2013 Oct;68(10):914-21
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - classification - mortality - physiopathology
Severity of Illness Index
Spirometry
Survival Analysis
Abstract
How different Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classifications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) predict mortality is unclear.
To examine the association of spirometric GOLD grades and the new ABCD groups with mortality, and to compare their informativeness in relation to mortality.
We studied 1540 people with post-bronchodilator COPD who participated in the Norwegian Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study 1995-1997 and were followed up on all-cause mortality until May 2012. The associations of spirometric GOLD grades and ABCD groups with mortality were estimated by sex specific adjusted HRs from Cox regression and standardised mortality ratios. To assess the informativeness of spirometric GOLD grades and ABCD groups at predicting mortality we used the difference in twice the log-likelihood of a Cox regression model with and without each COPD classification.
The distribution of participants was 28% in GOLD 1, 57% in GOLD 2, 13% in GOLD 3 and 2% in GOLD 4, in contrast to 61% in group A, 18% in group B, 12% in group C and 10% in group D. During a median of 14.6 years of follow-up, 837 people (54%) died. Mortality increased gradually from GOLD 1 to 4, while it was generally similar in groups A and B, and in groups C and D. Spirometric GOLD grades were substantially more informative than ABCD groups at predicting mortality.
Spirometric GOLD grades predicted mortality better than the new ABCD groups among people with COPD from a Norwegian general population.
Notes
Comment In: Thorax. 2013 Oct;68(10):902-323760545
PubMed ID
23611880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypertonic saline challenge tests in the diagnosis of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15314
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Oct;13(5):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Xiao-Mei Mai
Lennart Nilsson
N-I Max Kjellman
Bengt Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. xiama@ihm.liu.se
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2002 Oct;13(5):361-7
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Airway Obstruction - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Welfare
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds
Saline Solution, Hypertonic - administration & dosage - diagnostic use
School Health Services
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics
Sweden
Abstract
The hypertonic saline challenge test is the recommended method to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The sensitivity of this procedure to assess asthma symptoms, however, has been reported to vary among study centers. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the value of this provocation test in an epidemiological survey in children, and to relate the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness to the severity of asthma symptoms. All 11-13-year-old children from 16 randomly selected schools in Linköping, Sweden received a questionnaire regarding respiratory symptoms and allergic disease. Skin prick tests with eight inhalant allergens were performed. In addition, all children with wheeze over the past 12 months (current wheeze) and a random sample of children without current wheeze were invited to perform hypertonic saline provocation tests. A complete data set was available for 170 children, including 50 with and 120 without current wheeze. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was defined as at least 15% decline in FEV1. The degree of BHR was represented by the response/dose ratio, i.e. the fall in FEV1 divided by total dose of inhaled saline. The severity of asthma symptoms was classified by the number of wheezing episodes over the past 12 months. 'Asthma ever' was defined by a combination of symptoms in the questionnaires. Children with 'asthma ever' and current wheeze were considered as having current asthma. Current atopic asthma was defined as current asthma with at least one positive skin prick test. The sensitivity of the procedure to detect 'asthma ever', current asthma and current atopic asthma was 62, 61 and 83%, and the specificity 83, 81 and 60%, respectively. The positive challenge rate was 52, 34, 13 and 7% among current wheezers, previous wheezers, non-wheezers with a history of allergy and healthy children. The degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness increased with the number of wheezing episodes. Thus, the median and range of the response/dose ratio were 4.8%/ml (2.1-14.8), 2.6%/ml (0.7-8.6) and 1.3%/ml (0.8-2.7), respectively, for children with >/= 4 episodes, 1-3 episodes and no wheezing episodes over the past 12 months (p
PubMed ID
12431196 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is there an association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain? A nested case-control analysis in the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293039
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Nov 25; 7(11):e018521
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-25-2017
Author
Ingrid Heuch
Ivar Heuch
Knut Hagen
Xiao-Mei Mai
Arnulf Langhammer
John-Anker Zwart
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Innovation and Education, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Nov 25; 7(11):e018521
Date
Nov-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Pain
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore potential associations between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in a Norwegian cohort, and to investigate whether relationships depend on the season of blood sample collection.
A nested case-control study in a prospective data set.
The Norwegian community-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT). Data were collected in the HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) surveys.
Chronic LBP, defined as LBP persisting at least 3 months continuously during the past year.
Among individuals aged 19-55 years without LBP in HUNT2, a data set was generated including 1685 cases with LBP in HUNT3 and 3137 controls without LBP.
Blood samples from the participants collected in HUNT2 were analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level. Associations with LBP in HUNT3 were evaluated by unconditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, education, smoking, and body mass index.
No association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic LBP was found in the total data set (OR per 10?nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.01, 95%?CI 0.97 to 1.06) or in individuals with blood samples collected in summer/autumn (OR per 10?nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.99, 95%?CI 0.93 to 1.06). For blood samples drawn in winter/spring, associations differed significantly between women and men (p=0.004). Among women a positive association was seen (OR per 10?nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.11, 95%?CI 1.02 to 1.20), but among men no significant association was observed (OR per 10?nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.90, 95%?CI 0.81 to 1.01).
Overall, no association between vitamin D status and risk of LBP was demonstrated. The association suggested in women for the winter/spring season cannot be regarded as established.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36 PMID 14679378
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Mar;36(3):387-96 PMID 21694701
Cites: J Intern Med. 2017 Feb;281(2):167-178 PMID 27665750
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 19;357(3):266-81 PMID 17634462
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Feb 18;389(10070):736-747 PMID 27745712
Cites: Indian J Clin Biochem. 2015 Apr;30(2):174-9 PMID 25883425
Cites: Eur J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;23(4):e106-11 PMID 22560393
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Jul 20;:null PMID 28734989
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Apr;97(4):782-93 PMID 23446902
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-70 PMID 24197920
Cites: Pharmacol Res. 2017 Mar;117:228-241 PMID 28049048
Cites: J Pain Res. 2017 Apr 11;10 :855-865 PMID 28442927
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Dec 15;176(12):1169-76 PMID 23204497
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 May;56(5):785-91 PMID 18331295
Cites: Dermatoendocrinol. 2016 May 16;8(1):e1187349 PMID 27489574
Cites: Dermatoendocrinol. 2012 Apr 1;4(2):198-202 PMID 22928077
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2015 Apr;45(4):1019-26 PMID 25395037
Cites: Int J Rheum Dis. 2015 Nov;18(8):854-8 PMID 24119149
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Apr;111(4):524-7 PMID 21443983
Cites: Pain Physician. 2015 Sep-Oct;18(5):E853-62 PMID 26431139
Cites: Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Nov;26(11):1895-901 PMID 17377737
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 2003 Dec;78(12):1463-70 PMID 14661675
Cites: Clin Rheumatol. 2017 Dec;36(12 ):2825-2833 PMID 28812209
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 15;175(10):1029-36 PMID 22312120
Cites: Pain Physician. 2013 Mar-Apr;16(2):165-76 PMID 23511683
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Aug;69(8):1448-52 PMID 20498201
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013 Mar 04;14:78 PMID 23497097
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;42(4):968-77 PMID 22879362
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2016 Apr 11;16:306 PMID 27068452
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Jan 15;38(2):133-9 PMID 22718225
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2006 Aug;116(8):2062-72 PMID 16886050
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1164-6 PMID 24702014
Cites: BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 3;7(6):e017256 PMID 28674149
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr 15;171(8):903-8 PMID 20219763
Cites: Pain. 2009 Jan;141(1-2):10-3 PMID 19084336
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Apr 10;12 (4):e0175086 PMID 28394896
Cites: J Clin Chem Clin Biochem. 1983 Nov;21(11):709-20 PMID 6655447
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Jan 15;28(2):177-9 PMID 12544936
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e48774 PMID 23133659
Cites: BMJ. 2010 Nov 30;341:c6414 PMID 21118874
Cites: Int J Rheum Dis. 2010 Oct;13(4):340-6 PMID 21199469
Cites: Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2017 Jun 14;16(6):985-995 PMID 28485745
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1461-9 PMID 24423347
Cites: Endocrine. 2017 Jun;56(3):658-666 PMID 28417313
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):196-204 PMID 27189389
Cites: Nutrients. 2016 Jun 01;8(6): PMID 27258303
PubMed ID
29175890 View in PubMed
Less detail

The joint association of anxiety, depression and obesity with incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273096
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;42(5):1455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Ben Michael Brumpton
Linda Leivseth
Pål Richard Romundstad
Arnulf Langhammer
Yue Chen
Carlos Arturo Camargo
Xiao-Mei Mai
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;42(5):1455-63
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Asthma - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Anxiety or depression symptoms may increase the risk of developing asthma, and their interaction with obesity is not known. We aimed to assess the association of anxiety or depression symptoms and the joint association of these symptoms and obesity with incident asthma.
We conducted a prospective cohort study of 23 599 adults who were 19-55 years old and free from asthma at baseline in the Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to measure anxiety or depression symptoms. Obesity was defined as a body mass index=30.0 kg/m2. Incident asthma was self-reported new cases of asthma during the 11-year follow-up.
Having anxiety or depression symptoms was associated with incident asthma [odds ratio (OR) 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.78). Obese participants with anxiety or depression symptoms had a substantially higher risk of incident asthma (OR 2.93, 95% CI 2.20-3.91) than any other group (non-obese participants without anxiety or depression symptoms [reference], non-obese participants with anxiety or depression symptoms (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.45) and obese participants without anxiety or depression symptoms (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.19-1.82)]. The relative excess risk for incident asthma due to interaction between anxiety or depression symptoms and obesity was 1.26 (95% CI 0.39-2.12).
This study suggests that having anxiety or depression symptoms contributes to the development of asthma in adults. The risk of asthma may be further increased by the interaction between anxiety or depression symptoms and obesity.
PubMed ID
24008330 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.