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Birth defects surveillance in Ukraine: a process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76091
Source
J Appl Genet. 2006;47(2):143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Wladimir Wertelecki
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of South Alabama, 307 University Blvd., CCCB 214, Mobile, AL 36688, USA.
Source
J Appl Genet. 2006;47(2):143-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Birth defects (BD) surveillance using international standards was introduced in Ukraine by a network of five BD centers located in northwestern, central and southern regions. BD centers provide resources to access current and comprehensive information and to nurture partnerships with physicians, administrators, parental support groups, educators, and humanitarian assistance organizations. One outcome was the vigorous and popular website International BD Information Systems (IBIS). The network is now incorporated as OMNI-Net Ukraine. The program has documented high prevalence rates of neural tube defects (NTD); fetal alcohol effects (FAE); and idiopathic developmental retardation among orphans that prompted prevention and amelioration initiatives. Further program objectives include: universal folic acid flour fortification, as recommended by the Ukrainian Academy of Medicine; continued research on methods to reduce FAE in collaboration with partners from California; opening other early infant stimulation centers funded by local authorities, modeled on those in Rivne and Lutsk; and linking BD prevention with bioethical considerations, which is a topic of interest in Ukraine in part enhanced by the effects of Chornobyl.
PubMed ID
16682756 View in PubMed
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Chronic radiation exposure in the Rivne-Polissia region of Ukraine: Implications for birth defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99150
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Sep;22(5):667-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Kelsey Needham Dancause
Lyubov Yevtushok
Serhiy Lapchenko
Ihor Shumlyansky
Genadiy Shevchenko
Wladimir Wertelecki
Ralph M Garruto
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2010 Sep;22(5):667-74
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:: The health effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure remains a controversial question. Monitoring after the Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine suggested that chronic low-dose radiation exposure was not linked to cancer mortality among the general population. However, elevated rates of birth defects in contaminated compared to uncontaminated regions suggest that exposure to radiation in utero might impact development and that chronic radiation exposure might represent an underestimated risk to human health. METHODS:: We sought to determine current radiation exposure routes in Rivne-Polissia, a region of Ukraine contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. This represents a first step toward comprehensive studies of the effects of chronic radiation exposure on human health. We designed and administered a dietary and activity survey to 344 women in Polissia. We assessed types and sources of food consumed, types of outdoor activities, and alcohol intake. RESULTS:: Alcohol intake was low and alone does not account for the observed high rates of birth defects. Wild foods, especially mushrooms and berries, and locally produced foods, especially milk related, were major radiation exposure routes. Additionally, women were exposed to radiation through inhalation while burning grasses and potato vines in fields, and wood for cooking and heating. CONCLUSIONS:: Twenty four years after the Chernobyl accident, women continue to be chronically exposed to low-dose radiation at levels exceeding current recommendations. This might contribute (especially synergistically with alcohol consumption and micronutrient deficiencies) to higher prevalence of birth defects in areas of Ukraine with high levels of radiation contamination compared to uncontaminated areas. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 22:667-674, 2010. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PubMed ID
20737614 View in PubMed
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High rates of neural tube defects in Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63364
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2004 Jun;70(6):400-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Nataliya Yuskiv
Clark O Andelin
Svitlana Polischuk
Oleksandr Shevchuk
Zoryana Sosynyuk
Tetyana Vihovska
Lyubov Yevtushok
Godfrey P Oakley
Wladimir Wertelecki
Author Affiliation
Volyn Regional Children's Territorial Medical Center, Lutsk, Volyn, Ukraine.
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2004 Jun;70(6):400-2
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Oral consumption of synthetic folic acid can prevent neural tube defects (NTDs), which are some of the most severe congenital anomalies. The prevalence of NTDs in Ukraine and other countries of the former U.S.S.R. has not been well studied. We determined the prevalence of NTD-affected pregnancies in Northwestern Ukraine as background for policy decisions related to flour fortification in this country. METHODS: The Ukrainian-American Birth Defects Program was established in 1999 and conducts population- based surveillance of birth defects in several oblasts (states) of Ukraine. We determined the prevalence of NTDs in the Volyn and Rivne oblasts of Northwestern Ukraine for three years, 2000-2002. RESULTS: There were 75,928 births in the two oblasts in 2000-2002. There were 159 cases of NTDs among live births, stillbirths, and induced abortions. The prevalence of NTDs in the two oblasts in Northwestern Ukraine is 2.1 per 1000 births. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of NTD-affected pregnancies we found in Northwestern Ukraine is almost four times what it should be. This prevalence suggests that population folate deficiency is widespread in Ukraine. Universal folic acid fortification of flour milled in Ukraine is urgently needed to end this epidemic of birth defects. Such fortification would be expected to prevent folate deficiency anemia, heart attacks, and strokes.
PubMed ID
15211709 View in PubMed
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Malformations in a chornobyl-impacted region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97618
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Apr;125(4):e836-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Wladimir Wertelecki
Author Affiliation
Medical Genetics and Pediatrics, University of South Alabama, Technology Research Park IV, Suite 220, 307 University Blvd N, Mobile, AL 36688, USA. genfir3@gmail.com
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Apr;125(4):e836-43
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Neural Tube Defects - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Twins, Conjoined
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: One of the populations most exposed to chronic low-dose radiation from Chornobyl (Chernobyl in Russian) lives in Polissia, the region representing the northern half of Rivne Province (Oblast) in Ukraine. Here the patterns and population rates of malformations are reported and possible etiologic factors and regional contrasts are explored. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Malformations, as defined by international standards, noted among all 96 438 births in Rivne between 2000 and 2006, were analyzed statistically. Contrasts of rates in Polissia compared with the rest of Rivne also were investigated. RESULTS: The overall rate of neural tube defects in Rivne is among the highest in Europe (22.2 per 10,000 live births). The rates of conjoined twins and teratomas also seem to be elevated. In Polissia, the overall rates of neural tube defects are even higher (27.0 vs 18.3, respectively; odds ratio: 1.46 [95% confidence interval: 1.13-1.93]), and the rates of microcephaly and microphthalmia may also be elevated. CONCLUSIONS: The malformation patterns observed suggest early disruptions of blastogenesis, manifesting as alterations of body axes, twinning, duplications, laterality, and midline formation. The results are sufficiently compelling to justify continuing and expanding this investigation of malformations in chronic low-dose radiation-impacted regions of Ukraine.
PubMed ID
20308207 View in PubMed
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