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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Curr Biol. 2008 Sep 23;18(18):R837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2008
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2008 Sep 23;18(18):R837-8
Date
Sep-23-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Foxes
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Ursidae
PubMed ID
18843796 View in PubMed
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...but climate change indicators grow apace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95720
Source
Curr Biol. 2006 Jun 6;16(11):R389-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2006
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2006 Jun 6;16(11):R389-90
Date
Jun-6-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa
Arctic Regions
Greenhouse Effect
Oceans and Seas
Temperature
PubMed ID
16791936 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Jun 19;17(12):R435-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-2007
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Jun 19;17(12):R435-36
Date
Jun-19-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Canada
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Humans
Ice Cover
Seasons
Travel
PubMed ID
17647302 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2006 May 9;16(9):R301-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-9-2006
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2006 May 9;16(9):R301-2
Date
May-9-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Conservation of Natural Resources
Extraction and Processing Industry - ethics
Greenhouse Effect
PubMed ID
16752444 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2008 Jan 8;18(1):R6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2008
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2008 Jan 8;18(1):R6-7
Date
Jan-8-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Conservation of Natural Resources
Diving - physiology
Feeding Behavior
Oxygen - blood
Spheniscidae - metabolism - physiology
Abstract
New research finds that the emperor penguin is able to tolerate extremely low oxygen levels during its dives for food.
PubMed ID
18228637 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2009 Mar 24;19(6):R222-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2009
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2009 Mar 24;19(6):R222-3
Date
Mar-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Ice
Ice Cover
Politics
Research - standards
Research Support as Topic
PubMed ID
19330943 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Oct 23;17(20):R857-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2007
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Oct 23;17(20):R857-8
Date
Oct-23-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
PubMed ID
17987685 View in PubMed
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Support for neuregulin 1 as a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93199
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Sep 1;64(5):419-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2008
Author
Georgieva Lyudmila
Dimitrova Albena
Ivanov Dobril
Nikolov Ivan
Williams Nigel M
Grozeva Detelina
Zaharieva Irina
Toncheva Draga
Owen Michael J
Kirov George
O'Donovan Michael C
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychological Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, United Kingdom.
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Sep 1;64(5):419-27
Date
Sep-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Neuregulin-1 - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Schizophrenia - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is support that Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) plays a role in susceptibility to schizophrenia but limited evidence for its involvement in bipolar disorder. We wished to investigate further the involvement of NRG1 in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. METHODS: We used hierarchical association analysis in parent-offspring trios, 634 with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (SZ/SA) and 243 with bipolar 1 disorder (BP1). The primary analysis was the markers defining the "core Icelandic haplotype" (HAP(ICE)). We undertook polymorphism discovery, additional genotyping, and also explored phenotypic associations, as a secondary analysis aimed at refining the signal. RESULTS: The initial global haplotype test yielded significant evidence for association (p = .01) with SZ/SA and BP1 (p = .004), although HAP(ICE) was not overtransmitted. The marker showing strongest evidence for association in the deCODE studies, SNP8NRG221533, was associated with SZ/SA (p(corrected) = .039) and with BP1 (p(corrected) = .039), with BP1 showing association to the opposite allele as SZ/SA. The pattern of transmission at SNP8NRG221533 was significantly different in SZ/SA than in BP1 (p = .0004). Secondary analyses of markers and phenotypes provided no additional evidence for association to SZ/SA. However, a new marker, rs7014762, was associated with an a priori defined "typical" bipolar phenotype characterized by excellent recovery between episodes and no mood incongruent features (p(corrected) = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide significant levels of support for NRG1 as a susceptibility gene for both major forms of psychosis, and this cannot be interpreted as being due to population stratification. More tentatively, they also might indicate the presence of multiple alleles that influence the psychosis phenotype.
PubMed ID
18466881 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.