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Source
Science. 2005 Sep 16;309(5742):1814-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-2005
Author
Wiig Øystein
Source
Science. 2005 Sep 16;309(5742):1814-5
Date
Sep-16-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Ursidae
PubMed ID
16166501 View in PubMed
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Body size changes among otters, Lutra lutra, in Norway: the possible effects of food availability and global warming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81316
Source
Oecologia. 2006 Nov;150(1):155-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Yom-Tov Yoram
Heggberget Thrine Moen
Wiig Oystein
Yom-Tov Shlomith
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel. yomtov@post.tau.ac.il
Source
Oecologia. 2006 Nov;150(1):155-60
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Size - physiology
Diet
Geography
Greenhouse Effect
Norway
Otters - physiology
Regression Analysis
Abstract
Using museum data of adult specimens whose sex, age, and locality are known, we studied temporal and geographical body size trends among the otter, Lutra lutra, in Norway. We found that body size of the otters increased during the last quarter of the twentieth century, and suggest that this trend is related to increased food availability from fish farming and possibly also to energy saving due to elevated sea temperatures. Birth year and death year explained 38.8 and 43.5%, respectively, of the variation in body size. Body size of otters was positively related to latitude, thus conforming to Bergmann's rule.
PubMed ID
16868759 View in PubMed
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Quantifying the sensitivity of Arctic marine mammals to climate-induced habitat change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86586
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Mar;18(2 Suppl):S97-125
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Laidre Kristin L
Stirling Ian
Lowry Lloyd F
Wiig Oystein
Heide-Jørgensen Mads Peter
Ferguson Steven H
Author Affiliation
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Box 570, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland. klaidre@apl.washington.edu
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Mar;18(2 Suppl):S97-125
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We review seven Arctic and four subarctic marine mammal species, their habitat requirements, and evidence for biological and demographic responses to climate change. We then describe a pan-Arctic quantitative index of species sensitivity to climate change based on population size, geographic range, habitat specificity, diet diversity, migration, site fidelity, sensitivity to changes in sea ice, sensitivity to changes in the trophic web, and maximum population growth potential (R(max)). The index suggests three types of sensitivity based on: (1) narrowness of distribution and specialization in feeding, (2) seasonal dependence on ice, and (3) reliance on sea ice as a structure for access to prey and predator avoidance. Based on the index, the hooded seal, the polar bear, and the narwhal appear to be the three most sensitive Arctic marine mammal species, primarily due to reliance on sea ice and specialized feeding. The least sensitive species were the ringed seal and bearded seal, primarily due to large circumpolar distributions, large population sizes, and flexible habitat requirements. The index provides an objective framework for ranking species and focusing future research on the effects of climate change on Arctic marine mammals. Finally, we distinguish between highly sensitive species and good indicator species and discuss regional variation and species-specific ecology that confounds Arctic-wide generalization regarding the effects of climate change.
PubMed ID
18494365 View in PubMed
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Skull pathology in East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during 1892 to 2002 in relation to organochlorine pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79484
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2007 Jan 1;372(2-3):554-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2007
Author
Sonne Christian
Rigét Frank F
Dietz Rune
Wiig Oystein
Kirkegaard Maja
Born Erik W
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. csh@dmu.dk
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2007 Jan 1;372(2-3):554-61
Date
Jan-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Diseases - epidemiology
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Male
Periodontitis - epidemiology - veterinary
Skull - pathology
Svalbard - epidemiology
Tooth - pathology
Ursidae
Abstract
East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are heavily polluted with long-range transported organochlorines such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). To investigate the negative health impacts, a time-trend study of skull pathology was conducted on 269 East Greenland and 241 Svalbard polar bears. The skulls were sampled during 1892-2002 and 1964-1992, respectively. Seven different pathological changes were found: adonti, displacement of teeth, caries, osseous proliferations, exostosis, tooth wear and periodontitis. Only tooth wear and periodontitis was in a prevalence that allowed statistical treatment. The most severe cases of tooth wear and periodontitis were accompanied by a substantial loss of alveolar bone structure. The prevalence of tooth wear and periodontitis increased significantly with age (p
PubMed ID
17156821 View in PubMed
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