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The Intersection of Rural Residence and Minority Race/Ethnicity in Cancer Disparities in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311948
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 03; 18(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review
Date
02-03-2021
Author
Whitney E Zahnd
Cathryn Murphy
Marie Knoll
Gabriel A Benavidez
Kelsey R Day
Radhika Ranganathan
Parthenia Luke
Anja Zgodic
Kewei Shi
Melinda A Merrell
Elizabeth L Crouch
Heather M Brandt
Jan M Eberth
Author Affiliation
Rural & Minority Health Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29210, USA.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 03; 18(4):
Date
02-03-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
African Americans
Ethnic Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Minority Groups
Neoplasms
Rural Population
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
One in every twenty-five persons in America is a racial/ethnic minority who lives in a rural area. Our objective was to summarize how racism and, subsequently, the social determinants of health disproportionately affect rural racial/ethnic minority populations, provide a review of the cancer disparities experienced by rural racial/ethnic minority groups, and recommend policy, research, and intervention approaches to reduce these disparities. We found that rural Black and American Indian/Alaska Native populations experience greater poverty and lack of access to care, which expose them to greater risk of developing cancer and experiencing poorer cancer outcomes in treatment and ultimately survival. There is a critical need for additional research to understand the disparities experienced by all rural racial/ethnic minority populations. We propose that policies aim to increase access to care and healthcare resources for these communities. Further, that observational and interventional research should more effectively address the intersections of rurality and race/ethnicity through reduced structural and interpersonal biases in cancer care, increased data access, more research on newer cancer screening and treatment modalities, and continued intervention and implementation research to understand how evidence-based practices can most effectively reduce disparities among these populations.
PubMed ID
33546168 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Intersection of Rural Residence and Minority Race/Ethnicity in Cancer Disparities in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303607
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 03; 18(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Feb-03-2021
Author
Whitney E Zahnd
Cathryn Murphy
Marie Knoll
Gabriel A Benavidez
Kelsey R Day
Radhika Ranganathan
Parthenia Luke
Anja Zgodic
Kewei Shi
Melinda A Merrell
Elizabeth L Crouch
Heather M Brandt
Jan M Eberth
Author Affiliation
Rural & Minority Health Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29210, USA.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 03; 18(4):
Date
Feb-03-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
One in every twenty-five persons in America is a racial/ethnic minority who lives in a rural area. Our objective was to summarize how racism and, subsequently, the social determinants of health disproportionately affect rural racial/ethnic minority populations, provide a review of the cancer disparities experienced by rural racial/ethnic minority groups, and recommend policy, research, and intervention approaches to reduce these disparities. We found that rural Black and American Indian/Alaska Native populations experience greater poverty and lack of access to care, which expose them to greater risk of developing cancer and experiencing poorer cancer outcomes in treatment and ultimately survival. There is a critical need for additional research to understand the disparities experienced by all rural racial/ethnic minority populations. We propose that policies aim to increase access to care and healthcare resources for these communities. Further, that observational and interventional research should more effectively address the intersections of rurality and race/ethnicity through reduced structural and interpersonal biases in cancer care, increased data access, more research on newer cancer screening and treatment modalities, and continued intervention and implementation research to understand how evidence-based practices can most effectively reduce disparities among these populations.
PubMed ID
33546168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rural-urban and racial/ethnic trends and disparities in early-onset and average-onset colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304356
Source
Cancer. 2021 Jan 15; 127(2):239-248
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-15-2021
Author
Whitney E Zahnd
Scarlett L Gomez
Susan E Steck
Monique J Brown
Sabha Ganai
Jiajia Zhang
Swann Arp Adams
Franklin G Berger
Jan M Eberth
Author Affiliation
Rural and Minority Health Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
Source
Cancer. 2021 Jan 15; 127(2):239-248
Date
Jan-15-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Incidence rates (IRs) of early-onset colorectal cancer (EOCRC) are increasing, whereas average-onset colorectal cancer (AOCRC) rates are decreasing. However, rural-urban and racial/ethnic differences in trends by age have not been explored. The objective of this study was to examine joint rural-urban and racial/ethnic trends and disparities in EOCRC and AOCRC IRs.
Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data on the incidence of EOCRC (age, 20-49 years) and AOCRC (age, =50 years) were analyzed. Annual percent changes (APCs) in trends between 2000 and 2016 were calculated jointly by rurality and race/ethnicity. IRs and rate ratios were calculated for 2012-2016 by rurality, race/ethnicity, sex, and subsite.
EOCRC IRs increased 35% from 10.44 to 14.09 per 100,000 in rural populations (APC, 2.09; P
PubMed ID
33112412 View in PubMed
Less detail