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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Differences in pain patterns for infected and noninfected patients with burn injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79542
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2006 Dec;7(4):176-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Tengvall Oili M
Björnhagen Viveca C
Lindholm Christina
Jonsson Carl-Evert
Wengström Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Burn Unit, Institution of Surgical Sciences, Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden. oili@karolinska.se
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2006 Dec;7(4):176-82
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Burns - classification - complications
Cross Infection - classification - complications
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain - classification - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Wound Infection - classification - complications
Abstract
The management of pain is a primary issue in burn care. Patients hospitalized for burn injuries experience severe pain on a daily basis, immediately after the injury and during the healing of the burn wound. Our clinical experience is that the intensity of pain is increased by wound infection. The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively whether patients experience increased pain intensity in conjunction with wound infection. A total of 165 patients with burn injuries were included, 60 of whom were diagnosed with infection. The results of this study showed a significant increase in pain intensity in association with infection. An increase in pain is one of the factors to be considered among the many assessments, tests, and treatments for patients with burn injuries.
PubMed ID
17145492 View in PubMed
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The impact of a nurse-led clinic on self-care ability, disease-specific knowledge, and home dialysis modality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92733
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2008 May-Jun;35(3):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pagels Agneta A
Wång Marie
Wengström Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2008 May-Jun;35(3):242-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Choice Behavior
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemodialysis, Home - nursing - psychology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - nursing
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Patient Participation - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
A nurse-led clinic focusing on education and self-care for patients with advanced renal failure was introduced in a renal outpatient clinic in Sweden. The purpose was to enhance patients' disease-related knowledge, involvement, and self-care ability. This article reports the results of a study comparing patient outcomes with the nurse-led clinic to the previous model of care. The hypothesis was that the nurse-led clinic would increase medical control and self-care outcomes. The participants in the nurse-led clinic chose and started dialysis in a self-care alternative and also had a functioning, permanent dialysis access to a greater extent than the patients in the comparison group. Those choosing home-hemodialysis rated their self-care ability higher. The participants rated self-care and effects of treatment options on family and everyday life as the most important disease-related areas of knowledge.
PubMed ID
18649584 View in PubMed
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Nurses in cancer care--coping strategies when encountering existential issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83310
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2006 Apr;10(2):128-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Ekedahl Marieanne
Wengström Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Stockholm School of Theology, Akeshovsvägen 29, 168 39 Bromma, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2006 Apr;10(2):128-39
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Empathy
Existentialism - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recreation - psychology
Self Care - methods - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
This paper is a presentation of general/secular coping strategies and strategies related to the caritas orientation that nurses in cancer care use when encountering stress. As a concept, caritas indicates the will to do good. The paper tries to provide an answer to the question of which functional and dysfunctional coping strategies nurses use when coping with work-related stress. The study is qualitative and hypothesis-generating. The material analysed consists of 15 interviews with Swedish registered nurses and is based on a life-story approach. Pargament's coping theory related to the psychology of religion has been applied for interpretation purposes. The nurses use several coping strategies with the dominant strategy being a general boundary demarcation. Other strategies that were used for coping included emotional outlets, caritas--oblivion and periodically changing activity. The strategies can be used in a functional or dysfunctional way; e.g. dysfunctional coping was present when there was a lack of human support and boundary demarcation.
PubMed ID
16126004 View in PubMed
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The psychometric properties of the Swedish Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory MFI-20 in four different populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78048
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(1):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hagelin Carina Lundh
Wengström Yvonne
Runesdotter Sara
Fürst Carl Johan
Author Affiliation
Research & Development unit, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. carina.lundh@stockholmssjukhem.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(1):97-104
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Fatigue - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Fatigue - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasms - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Palliative Care
Psychometrics - methods - standards
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale is widely used for measuring fatigue in cancer care. This questionnaire has been translated into Swedish and used in Swedish cancer populations, and the aim of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the Swedish version in four populations, with a total of 584 patients. The participants were classified into four groups: palliative cancer patients, cancer patients receiving radiation therapy, non-cancer outpatients, and a group of hospital staff. The MFI-20 consists of five subscales of fatigue: General Fatigue (GF), Physical Fatigue (PF), Reduced Motivation (RM), Reduced Activity (RA) and Mental Fatigue (MF). We have tested the convergent validity of the MFI-20 using the Category Ratio instrument (CR-10). The validity and the reliability of MFI-20 were acceptable. All subscales of the MFI-20 were correlated, and all were also correlated with the CR-10 score (p
PubMed ID
17438711 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and persisting symptoms after oesophageal cancer surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82055
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2006 Jul;42(10):1407-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Viklund Pernilla
Wengström Yvonne
Rouvelas Ioannis
Lindblad Mats
Lagergren Jesper
Author Affiliation
Unit of Esophageal and Gastric Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery P9:03, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. pernilla.viklund@karolinska.se
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2006 Jul;42(10):1407-14
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardia
Esophageal Neoplasms - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Statistics, nonparametric
Stomach Neoplasms - surgery
Sweden
Abstract
To assess quality of life (QoL) and symptoms after oesophageal cancer surgery, a prospective nationwide population-based study was conducted in 2001-2005, including most surgically treated oesophageal cancer patients in Sweden. Six months postoperatively patients responded to an EORTC quality of life core questionnaire (QLQ C-30) with an oesophageal-specific module (OES-18). Mean scores were calculated. Mann-Whitney test was used for group comparisons. Among 282 patients, QoL was considerably reduced compared to a reference general population (P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2007 Feb;4(2):74-517259926
PubMed ID
16737812 View in PubMed
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What symptom and functional dimensions can be predictors for global ratings of overall quality of life in lung cancer patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85234
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Oct;15(10):1199-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Ostlund Ulrika
Wennman-Larsen Agneta
Gustavsson Petter
Wengström Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, 23300, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. ulrika.ostlund@ki.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Oct;15(10):1199-205
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study explores what dimensions of a health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaire predict global ratings of overall quality of life (QOL) in lung cancer patients in assessments by patients and significant others, respectively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analyses were based on dyadic assessments from lung cancer patients and their significant others. A subset of scales and items from the Swedish version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ C30 and the lung-cancer-specific module, LC-13, was selected. Using multiple regression procedures, the relative importance of different symptoms and of functional impairments in predicting overall QOL was examined. RESULTS: The multiple regressions revealed that emotional functioning and fatigue were the only significant predictors of overall QOL for both the patients and the significant others' assessments. In addition, physical functioning was found to be another predictor in the significant others' assessments. CONCLUSION: The results emphasize that it is essential to consider both emotional functioning and fatigue as important areas for overall QOL in lung cancer patients.
PubMed ID
17431688 View in PubMed
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WISECARE+: Results of a European study of a nursing intervention for the management of chemotherapy-related symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91721
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Dec;12(5):443-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kearney Nora
Miller Morven
Maguire Roma
Dolan Shelley
MacDonald Roseanne
McLeod Joan
Maher Louise
Sinclair Lesley
Norrie John
Wengström Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Research Centre, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, UK. nora.kearney@stir.ac.uk
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Dec;12(5):443-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Attitude to Health
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Europe
Evidence-Based Nursing
Fatigue - chemically induced - prevention & control
Humans
Middle Aged
Nausea - chemically induced - prevention & control
Neoplasms - drug therapy - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Evaluation Research
Oncologic Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Stomatitis - chemically induced - prevention & control
Vomiting - chemically induced - prevention & control
Abstract
While the use of chemotherapy has significantly improved survival rates, the symptoms associated with chemotherapy remain a major burden for patients. Preventing or appropriately managing side effects significantly improves patients' functional status and quality of life, ultimately leading to greater patient acceptance of chemotherapy. However, symptom assessment and management are fraught with difficulties such as poor patient recall, retrospective assessment conducted by clinicians and lack of appropriate, clinically relevant and patient friendly symptom assessment and management tools. Furthermore the differences between clinician and patient perceptions of stresses and distress during chemotherapy are well recognised. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a nursing intervention incorporating structured symptom assessment and management, facilitated by information technology, on chemotherapy-related symptoms, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and mucositis. This pan-European study, involved 8 clinical sites from Belgium, Denmark, England, Ireland and Scotland. Adults (n=249) receiving first line chemotherapy for breast, lung, ovarian or colorectal cancer, osteosarcoma, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma were recruited to the study. Patients completed daily symptom assessment questionnaires for 14 days following consecutive cycles of chemotherapy. Symptom outcomes were compared before and after the introduction of the intervention with positive impact on patients' experiences of nausea, vomiting and oral problems. Fatigue was not significantly improved.
PubMed ID
18842457 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.