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An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59040
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
A. Eklöw
M L Danielsson-Tham
S. Loncarevic
L O Mentzing
I. Persson
H. Unnerstad
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Obstetric labor, premature
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported.
PubMed ID
9350756 View in PubMed
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A case of foodborne listeriosis in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72811
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 1997 Jan;24(1):65-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
S. Loncarevic
M L Danielsson-Tham
L. Mårtensson
A. Ringnér
A. Runehagen
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Vetennary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Semir.Loncarevic@Lmhyg.shu.se
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 1997 Jan;24(1):65-8
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Culture Media
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Epidemiology, Molecular
Female
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria Infections - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Meningitis, Bacterial - diagnosis
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Public Health Administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Sweden
Abstract
A 70-year-old woman fell seriously ill overnight with meningitis and was admitted to hospital. Cerebrospinal fluid culture yielded Listeria monocytogenes. One of the first problems in solving a human case of listeriosis suspected to be foodborne is to find the foods likely to have been transmitting L. monocytogenes. Two enrichment procedures and a direct plating procedure were used for isolation of the bacteria from different food items collected from the patient's refrigerator, local retail store and producer. Samples of vacuum-packed products of sliced pork brawn, sliced cooked medwurst and berliner wurst of the same brand harboured L. monocytogenes. Serotyping and restriction enzyme analysis (REA) with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to characterize and compare 41 isolates, including the human strain. At least three clones were present in the foods investigated, and one of these was identical to the human clone. This clone was present in samples of medwurst from the patient's refrigerator and the local retail store. This is, to our knowledge, the first proven foodborne case of listeriosis reported in Sweden.
PubMed ID
9024007 View in PubMed
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Febrile gastroenteritis after eating on-farm manufactured fresh cheese--an outbreak of listeriosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13906
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
J J Carrique-Mas
I. Hökeberg
Y. Andersson
M. Arneborn
W. Tham
M L Danielsson-Tham
B. Osterman
M. Leffler
M. Steen
E. Eriksson
G. Hedin
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE-17182 Solna, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cheese - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis affected consumers of on-farm manufactured dairy products from a summer farm in Sweden. Symptoms included diarrhoea, fever, stomach cramps and vomiting in 88, 60, 54 and 21% of cases identified. The median incubation period was 31 h. A cohort study with 33 consumers showed an attack rate of 52% and an association between the total amount of product eaten and illness (P=0.07). Twenty-seven of 32 (84%) stool samples cultured for Listeria monocytogenes tested positive, although there was no association between clinical disease and the isolation of L. monocytogenes. In addition, gene sequences for VTEC and ETEC were detected in 6 and 1 subjects, respectively. Bacteriological analysis of cheese samples revealed heavy contamination with L. monocytogenes and coagulase positive staphylococci in all of them and gene markers for VTEC in one of them. Molecular profiles for L. monocytogenes isolated from dairy products, stool samples and an abscess from 1 patient who developed septic arthritis were identical. Results of both microbiological and epidemiological analyses point to L. monocytogenes as the most likely cause of this outbreak. The finding of markers for VTEC in some humans and cheese samples means that a mixed aetiology at least in some cases cannot be conclusively ruled out.
PubMed ID
12613748 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden during half a century (1958-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259026
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
G. Lopez-Valladares
W. Tham
V Singh Parihar
S. Helmersson
B. Andersson
S. Ivarsson
C. Johansson
H. Ringberg
I. Tjernberg
B. Henriques-Normark
M-L Danielsson-Tham
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Salmon
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Serotyping - methods
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes (n = 932) isolated in Sweden during 1958-2010 from human patients with invasive listeriosis were characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (AscI). Of the 932 isolates, 183 different PFGE types were identified, of which 83 were each represented by only one isolate. In all, 483 serovar 1/2a isolates were distributed over 114 PFGE types; 90 serovar 1/2b isolates gave 32 PFGE types; 21 serovar 1/2c isolates gave nine PFGE types; three serovar 3b isolates gave one PFGE type; and, 335 serovar 4b isolates gave 31 PFGE types. During the 1980s in Sweden, several serovar 4b cases were associated with the consumption of European raw soft cheese. However, as cheese-production hygiene has improved, the number of 4b cases has decreased. Since 1996, serovar 1/2a has been the dominant L. monocytogenes serovar in human listeriosis in Sweden. Therefore, based on current serovars and PFGE types, an association between human cases of listeriosis and the consumption of vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked salmon is suggested.
PubMed ID
24480252 View in PubMed
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Lessons from an outbreak of listeriosis related to vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196107
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):173-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000
Author
W. Tham
H. Ericsson
S. Loncarevic
H. Unnerstad
M L Danielsson-Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden. wilhelm.tham@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):173-5
Date
Dec-20-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Food Handling
Food Preservation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Refrigeration
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The first lesson learned from this outbreak was that vacuum-packed rainbow trout is not only an excellent medium for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, but may also cause human listeriosis. Another lesson is that one single fish processing plant may spread multiple clonal types of L. monocytogenes by selling contaminated products to consumers. Thus, when investigating fish-borne outbreaks of listeriosis one should identify and type several isolates of L. monocytogenes from each food and environmental sample, since multiple clonal types might be present. The outbreak described in this paper involved at least eight human cases, three clonal types of L. monocytogenes, and lasted for 11 months. During the outbreak investigation, L. monocytogenes was also isolated from another brand of rainbow trout found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. These latter isolates belonged to a clonal type not associated with the outbreak. However, this clonal type is of considerable interest since it has been associated with foodborne outbreaks of listeriosis in several countries, and is also the second most common clonal type among human clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes in Sweden. Besides the described outbreak, it is likely that vacuum-packed, cold-smoked and gravad rainbow trout have been involved in additional cases of foodborne listeriosis in Sweden.
PubMed ID
11156259 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Listeriosis. An international epidemic phagovar of Listeria monocytogenes isolated also in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75603
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Sep 14;91(37):3249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-1994
Author
W. Tham
M L Danielsson-Tham
H. Ericsson
J. Ursing
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för livsmedelshygien, veterinärmedicinska fakulteten, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Sep 14;91(37):3249-50
Date
Sep-14-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Food Microbiology
Food poisoning
France - epidemiology
Humans
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Switzerland - epidemiology
PubMed ID
7934328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Subtyping of a frequent phagovar of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden by use of restriction endonuclease analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219796
Source
APMIS. 1993 Dec;101(12):971-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
H. Ericsson
M L Danielsson-Tham
P. Stålhandske
W. Tham
J. Ursing
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish Agricultural University, Uppsala.
Source
APMIS. 1993 Dec;101(12):971-4
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases
Cheese
Deoxyribonuclease EcoRI
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology - veterinary
Restriction Mapping
Sheep
Sheep Diseases
Sweden
Abstract
In Sweden, many Listeria monocytogenes strains belonging to serovar 4b and isolated during the last five years from different sources share the same phagovar--2389:2425:3274:2671:47:108:340. The object of the present study was to investigate if 31 L. monocytogenes serovar 4b strains belonging to this particular phagovar could be differentiated by use of a simple restriction endonuclease analysis (REA). Among the enzymes tested, Xho I was found to be the most useful, since this enzyme could divide the 31 strains into five groups. The profiles of all human clinical isolates were indistinguishable from each other, which indicates that these strains may represent a single clone. The food isolates and the strains of human origin did not share the same profile. This further characterization may be of epidemiological importance as this phagovar of L. monocytogenes has been associated with at least two outbreaks of human listeriosis in Europe.
PubMed ID
8110454 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.