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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Accuracy and consistency of quadratic odds estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225712
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
B W Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824.
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Michigan - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Office Visits
Ontario
Probability
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
In medical practices that do not have rosters, only the number of patients who come to the practice can be enumerated: the number who might have visited if they had had a reason to do so remains unknown. The Quadratic Odds Estimator is a technique for estimating the total number of patients cared for by a primary care medical practice, including the non-visitors. A revised version of the model is shown to have an error of less than 1% in predicting the number of patients at risk of visiting a primary care medical practice. Aggregate and sex-specific estimates of total practice size are shown to be comparable to within 2%. The model estimates the prevalence of hypertension among the patients of two family practice resdencies as 18 and 11%. The rationale for employing unconventional regression weights and dual regressions is explained.
PubMed ID
1959728 View in PubMed
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Alaska's obstetrical delivery systems: a descriptive epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4519
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):78-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
D W Smith
N J Murphy
Author Affiliation
University of Washington School of Medicine, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. dsmith@afpr.fammed.washington.edu
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):78-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Anesthesia, Obstetrical
Cesarean Section
Comparative Study
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Emergencies
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Obstetrics - manpower
Operating Rooms
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
Delivery of obstetrical care in rural Alaska can be very challenging, due to remoteness, lack of medical resources and transportation difficulties. This descriptive study looks at what the current delivery systems for obstetrical care in Alaska are. Alaska's obstetrical delivery systems can be divided into three basic systems. 1) Full comprehensive obstetrical care limited only by lack of neonatal ICU capability. 2) Cesarean delivery capable, but with limited resources. 3) Low risk vaginal deliveries with no cesarean delivery capability except by transports approaching 6 hours. This study raises questions about which system is most effective for which communities. Further studies need to be undertaken to better understand how to provide effective obstetrical care in rural and bush Alaska at an acceptable risk, and at reasonable cost.
PubMed ID
11042940 View in PubMed
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Contribution of leukotriene B4 to airway inflammation and the effect of antagonists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16108
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;629:274-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
I M Richards
F F Sun
B M Taylor
S K Shields
R L Griffin
J. Morris
D G Wishka
H W Smith
R A Johnson
C J Dunn
Author Affiliation
Hypersensitivity Diseases Research, Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49004.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;629:274-87
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Animals
Chemotaxis, Leukocyte - drug effects
Comparative Study
Eosinophils - drug effects - physiology
Guinea Pigs
Inflammation
Leukotriene B4 - antagonists & inhibitors - physiology
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Male
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Structure-Activity Relationship
Abstract
Inhalation of aerosols of ovalbumin in sensitized guinea pigs produced a marked, bronchoalveolar eosinophilia 24 hr after challenge. The lung eosinophilia was not prevented by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin or PAF antagonists (WEB-2086 and L-652731) but was inhibited by methylprednisolone, the 5-LO inhibitor, U-66858 and a series of structural analogs of LTB4, U-75302, U-77692, U-75485 and U-78489. The effectiveness of LTB4 antagonists but not PAF antagonists in vivo was consistent with in vitro studies in which LTB4 was shown to be far more chemotactic than PAF for guinea pig eosinophils. LTB4 elicited maximal directional migration of guinea pig eosinophils at concentrations from 10(-7) M to 10(-9) M while PAF showed no effect over the same concentration range. The structural analogs of LTB4 were shown to inhibit LTB4 induced chemotaxis of guinea pig eosinophils and produced a dose-related inhibition of binding of LTB4 to guinea pig eosinophil membranes. To add further proof to the hypothesis that LTB4 contributed to the antigen-induced lung eosinophilia we attempted to measure LTB4 release into BAL fluid immediately after and at various time points up to 24 hr after antigen inhalation. However, using a sensitive radioimmunoassay (detection limit 10 pg/ml) very low levels of LTB4 (24.9-67.9 pg/ml) or its metabolite, 20-OH LTB4 (24.9-98.2 pg/ml) were detected in BAL fluid and these levels did not increase significantly following antigen provocation. Inhalation of LTB4 aerosols in unsensitized Brown-Norway rats or inhalation of aerosols of ovalbumin in sensitized Brown-Norway rats also produced a marked "late-phase" eosinophil-rich influx of inflammatory cells into the lungs. The lung eosinophilia in the rat was prevented by two structurally unrelated leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonists, U-75302 and Ly255283. These data implicate LTB4 as a mediator of allergen-induced bronchopulmonary eosinophilia. Leukotriene B4 antagonists may provide leads for the development of compounds which inhibit the chronic airway inflammation associated with asthma in man.
PubMed ID
1659282 View in PubMed
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Demyelination in the brain as a paraneoplastic disorder: candidates include some cases of multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172516
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(4):212
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Deployable laboratory response to influenza pandemic; PCR assay field trials and comparison with reference methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130236
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e25526
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Timothy J J Inglis
Adam J Merritt
Avram Levy
Patricia Vietheer
Richard Bradbury
Adam Scholler
Glenys Chidlow
David W Smith
Author Affiliation
Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. tim.inglis@health.wa.gov.au
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e25526
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - methods
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - standards
RNA, Viral - genetics - isolation & purification
Reference Standards
Abstract
The influenza A/H1N1/09 pandemic spread quickly during the Southern Hemisphere winter in 2009 and reached epidemic proportions within weeks of the official WHO alert. Vulnerable population groups included indigenous Australians and remote northern population centres visited by international travellers. At the height of the Australian epidemic a large number of troops converged on a training area in northern Australia for an international exercise, raising concerns about their potential exposure to the emerging influenza threat before, during and immediately after their arrival in the area. Influenza A/H1N1/09 became the dominant seasonal variant and returned to Australia during the Southern winter the following year.
A duplex nucleic acid amplification assay was developed within weeks of the first WHO influenza pandemic alert, demonstrated in northwestern Australia shortly afterwards and deployed as part of the pathology support for a field hospital during a military exercise during the initial epidemic surge in June 2009.
The nucleic acid amplification assay was twice as sensitive as a point of care influenza immunoassay, as specific but a little less sensitive than the reference laboratory nucleic acid amplification assay. Repetition of the field assay with blinded clinical samples obtained during the 2010 winter influenza season demonstrated a 91.7% congruence with the reference laboratory method.
Rapid in-house development of a deployable epidemic influenza assay allowed a flexible laboratory response, effective targeting of limited disease control resources in an austere military environment, and provided the public health laboratory service with a set of verification tools for resource-limited settings. The assay method was suitable for rapid deployment in time for the 2010 Northern winter.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Oct;46(10):3479-8118716231
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Sep;49(9):3368-921775544
Cites: Mil Med. 2009 Jan;174(1):35-4119216296
Cites: Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2007 Jul;1(4):167-7519432632
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2009 Jul;45(3):203-419515611
Cites: Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2009 Jul;3(4):171-619627374
Cites: Med J Aust. 2009 Aug 3;191(3):146-919645642
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 13;361(7):728-919564634
Cites: J Clin Virol. 2009 Dec;46(4):384-619828366
Cites: Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2009 Dec;3 Suppl 2:S117-2019952884
Cites: Med J Aust. 2009 Dec 7-21;191(11-12):597-820028275
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2010 Mar;48(3):862-620071557
Cites: Rev Esp Salud Publica. 2010 Sep-Oct;84(5):597-60721203722
Cites: Arch Virol. 2011 Aug;156(8):1371-821503642
Cites: J Vis Exp. 2011;(54). pii: 2829. doi: 10.3791/282921847073
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2008 Nov 15;198(10):1427-3418808337
PubMed ID
22022407 View in PubMed
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Development of the Canadian Marginalization Index: a new tool for the study of inequality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128386
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(8 Suppl 2):S12-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Flora I Matheson
James R Dunn
Katherine L W Smith
Rahim Moineddin
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. mathesonf@smh.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(8 Suppl 2):S12-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Censuses
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Area-based measures of socio-economic status are increasingly used in population health research. Based on previous research and theory, the Canadian Marginalization Index (CAN-Marg) was created to reflect four dimensions of marginalization: residential instability, material deprivation, dependency and ethnic concentration. The objective of this paper was threefold: to describe CAN-Marg; to illustrate its stability across geographic area and time; and to describe its association with health and behavioural problems.
CAN-Marg was created at the dissemination area (DA) and census tract level for census years 2001 and 2006, using factor analysis. Descriptions of 18 health and behavioural problems were selected using individual-level data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 3.1 and 2007/08. CAN-Marg quintiles created at the DA level (2006) were assigned to individual CCHS records. Multilevel logistic regression modeling was conducted to examine associations between marginalization and CCHS health and behavioural problems.
The index demonstrated marked stability across time and geographic area. Each of the four dimensions showed strong and significant associations with the selected health and behavioural problems, and these associations differed depending on which of the dimensions of marginalization was examined.
CAN-Marg is a census-based, empirically derived and theoretically informed tool designed to reflect a broader conceptualization of Canadian marginalization.
PubMed ID
23618065 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies between men and women in reporting number of sexual partners: a summary from four countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225063
Source
Soc Biol. 1992 Fall-Winter;39(3-4):203-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
T W Smith
Author Affiliation
National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago, IL 60637.
Source
Soc Biol. 1992 Fall-Winter;39(3-4):203-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada
Data Collection
Deception
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sex ratio
Sexual Partners
United States
Women - psychology
Abstract
Men and women in national surveys from four countries, the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and Norway, give mutually inconsistent reports of numbers of opposite-gender sexual partners. In all cases the number of female partners reported by men exceeds the number of male partners reported by women. Gender difference in reporting bias seems to be the most plausible explanation for the discrepancies.
PubMed ID
1340040 View in PubMed
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Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304243
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
11-06-2020
Author
Sarah C Davidson
Gil Bohrer
Eliezer Gurarie
Scott LaPoint
Peter J Mahoney
Natalie T Boelman
Jan U H Eitel
Laura R Prugh
Lee A Vierling
Jyoti Jennewein
Emma Grier
Ophélie Couriot
Allicia P Kelly
Arjan J H Meddens
Ruth Y Oliver
Roland Kays
Martin Wikelski
Tomas Aarvak
Joshua T Ackerman
José A Alves
Erin Bayne
Bryan Bedrosian
Jerrold L Belant
Andrew M Berdahl
Alicia M Berlin
Dominique Berteaux
Joël Bêty
Dmitrijs Boiko
Travis L Booms
Bridget L Borg
Stan Boutin
W Sean Boyd
Kane Brides
Stephen Brown
Victor N Bulyuk
Kurt K Burnham
David Cabot
Michael Casazza
Katherine Christie
Erica H Craig
Shanti E Davis
Tracy Davison
Dominic Demma
Christopher R DeSorbo
Andrew Dixon
Robert Domenech
Götz Eichhorn
Kyle Elliott
Joseph R Evenson
Klaus-Michael Exo
Steven H Ferguson
Wolfgang Fiedler
Aaron Fisk
Jérôme Fort
Alastair Franke
Mark R Fuller
Stefan Garthe
Gilles Gauthier
Grant Gilchrist
Petr Glazov
Carrie E Gray
David Grémillet
Larry Griffin
Michael T Hallworth
Autumn-Lynn Harrison
Holly L Hennin
J Mark Hipfner
James Hodson
James A Johnson
Kyle Joly
Kimberly Jones
Todd E Katzner
Jeff W Kidd
Elly C Knight
Michael N Kochert
Andrea Kölzsch
Helmut Kruckenberg
Benjamin J Lagassé
Sandra Lai
Jean-François Lamarre
Richard B Lanctot
Nicholas C Larter
A David M Latham
Christopher J Latty
James P Lawler
Don-Jean Léandri-Breton
Hansoo Lee
Stephen B Lewis
Oliver P Love
Jesper Madsen
Mark Maftei
Mark L Mallory
Buck Mangipane
Mikhail Y Markovets
Peter P Marra
Rebecca McGuire
Carol L McIntyre
Emily A McKinnon
Tricia A Miller
Sander Moonen
Tong Mu
Gerhard J D M Müskens
Janet Ng
Kerry L Nicholson
Ingar Jostein Øien
Cory Overton
Patricia A Owen
Allison Patterson
Aevar Petersen
Ivan Pokrovsky
Luke L Powell
Rui Prieto
Petra Quillfeldt
Jennie Rausch
Kelsey Russell
Sarah T Saalfeld
Hans Schekkerman
Joel A Schmutz
Philipp Schwemmer
Dale R Seip
Adam Shreading
Mónica A Silva
Brian W Smith
Fletcher Smith
Jeff P Smith
Katherine R S Snell
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Diana V Solovyeva
Mathew S Sorum
Grigori Tertitski
J F Therrien
Kasper Thorup
T Lee Tibbitts
Ingrid Tulp
Brian D Uher-Koch
Rob S A van Bemmelen
Steven Van Wilgenburg
Andrew L Von Duyke
Jesse L Watson
Bryan D Watts
Judy A Williams
Matthew T Wilson
James R Wright
Michael A Yates
David J Yurkowski
Ramunas Žydelis
Mark Hebblewhite
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Date
11-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animal Migration
Animals
Archives
Arctic Regions
Ecological Parameter Monitoring
Population
Abstract
The Arctic is entering a new ecological state, with alarming consequences for humanity. Animal-borne sensors offer a window into these changes. Although substantial animal tracking data from the Arctic and subarctic exist, most are difficult to discover and access. Here, we present the new Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA), a growing collection of more than 200 standardized terrestrial and marine animal tracking studies from 1991 to the present. The AAMA supports public data discovery, preserves fundamental baseline data for the future, and facilitates efficient, collaborative data analysis. With AAMA-based case studies, we document climatic influences on the migration phenology of eagles, geographic differences in the adaptive response of caribou reproductive phenology to climate change, and species-specific changes in terrestrial mammal movement rates in response to increasing temperature.
PubMed ID
33154141 View in PubMed
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Effect of the selective leukotriene B4 antagonists U-75302 and Ly255283 on bronchoalveolar eosinophilia induced by inhalation of leukotriene B4 or allergen in brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12109
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;629:428-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

24 records – page 1 of 3.